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Hydropower Transmission Siting and Interconnection Overview (8)

A hydropower developer must consider issues related to the associated transmission lines and interconnection of the generation facility to the electric grid.

Pursuant to the Federal Power Act, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) has jurisdiction over interconnection of wholesale generators that need to connect their generation facilities to a transmission system. FERC has authority over “public utilities,” which under 16 USC 824a(e) includes any person who owns or operates facilities subject to jurisdiction of FERC. This also includes any person who owns or operates a facility for the transmission of electric energy in interstate commerce and to the sale of electric energy at wholesale in interstate commerce. Interstate commerce has been interpreted broadly to include when the transmission system is interconnected and capable of transmitting electric energy across the state boundary, even if the contracting parties and the electrical pathway between them are in one state. See Florida Power & Light Company, 29 FERC, ¶ 61, 140 at 61, 291-92 (1984). To obviate the delays and lack of standardization that once discouraged merchant generators from entering the market place and thereby provided an unfair advantage to utilities that owned both transmission and generation facilities, FERC established a uniform set of procedures and agreements to govern the process of interconnecting to the grid.


A FERC hydropower license establishes access to federal lands for transmission lines sited within the FERC license boundary. However, the FERC license is subject to conditions set forth by the federal land management agency/agencies charged with the administration of federal lands that may be impacted by the proposed project. Federal land management agencies may also require the developer to obtain a right-of-way or special use authorization if transmission lines will cross over federal lands administered by those agencies. The conditions of the right-of-way or special use authorization may be similar to the conditions contained within the FERC license, but provide the land management agency with some limited, independent jurisdictional authority over the operation of the hydropower project as it pertains to the project’s potential to impact agency lands. For transmission lines located outside of the FERC license boundary, the developer will need to obtain access to federal lands through the relevant land management agency’s rights-of-way application process. These rights-of-way will also contain any mandatory terms and conditions the agency deems necessary for the protection of federal land resources.

If proposed transmission lines will cross private land, the developer must obtain a property right to use the land, which may be accomplished by purchasing the land or negotiating a lease with the private landowner. Alternatively, a FERC hydropower license may allow a developer to obtain private land within the FERC project boundary through the process of eminent domain.

If proposed transmission lines will cross state lands, the developer must obtain state land access from the appropriate state land manager and may be required to obtain authorization for interconnection to the grid from the appropriate state agency. For transmission lines located outside of the FERC license boundary, the state may also require the developer to obtain any necessary rights-of-way, encroachment permits, and/or a Certificate of Public Good, a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity, or similar approval from the state utility regulatory authority. These approvals ensure public and onsite safety; grid connection, accountability and transparency.


Transmission Siting and Interconnection Overview Process

8.1 to 8.2 – Will the Transmission Facility Be within the Project Boundary of a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Licensed Project?

FERC hydropower licenses establish a project boundary encompassing a “complete unit of development” which includes all transmission lines and other structures located within the FERC license boundary. (FPA section 3(11)). FERC licenses establish access to federal lands for siting transmission lines. In addition, if the developer is unable to obtain the requisite land access to private lands through negotiation, FERC licenses confer the power of eminent domain that would, as a less desirable alternative, permit a developer to obtain private land required for siting transmission lines. However, developers will need to obtain state land access and interconnection to the grid as described in 8.3 to 8.13 (below).

FERC Hydropower Overview:
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8.3 to 8.6 – Will the Facility Be Owned or Operated by a Public Utility and Transmit Electric Energy in Interstate Commerce?

A “public utility” is defined by 16 U.S.C. 824(e) as “any person who owns or operates facilities subject to the jurisdiction of the [Federal Energy Regulatory Commission] under this subchapter…” Public utilities that are subject to the jurisdiction of FERC are those that transmit electric energy in interstate commerce or sell electric energy at wholesale in interstate commerce. See 16 U.S.C. 824(b). Electric energy is transmitted in interstate commerce if it is “transmitted from a State and consumed at any point outside thereof; but only insofar as such transmission takes place within the United States.” See 16 U.S.C. 824(c).

FERC order No. 2003 applies to all public utilities that own, control or operate facilities used for transmitting electric energy in interstate commerce to have on file standard procedures and a standard agreement for interconnecting generators larger than 20 MW. For more information, see:

(See FERC Order No. 2003)

FERC Order No. 2003 Process for Interconnection:
8-FD-a

FERC Order No. 792 requires all public utilities that own, control, or operate facilities used for transmitting electric energy in interstate commerce to adopt standard rules for interconnecting new sources of electricity no larger than 20 megawatts (MW). FERC Order No. 792 continues the process begun in Order No. 2003 of standardizing the terms and conditions of interconnection service for interconnection customers of all sizes. For more information, see:

FERC Order No. 792 Process for Interconnection:
8-FD-b

8.7 to 8.10 – Will the Project Interconnect with the Local or Regional Power Grid?

The Federal Energy Administration Act requires certain developers of electric generating plants to submit an annual electric generator report to the US Energy Information Administration EIA (EIA), which collects and publishes data on the status of existing and proposed electric generating plants. Generally, the developer of a proposed hydropower project must provide information to the EIA if the project: 1) will interconnect with the local or regional power grid; 2) has a proposed nameplate capacity of 1 MW or greater; and 3) is expected to begin commercial operation within five years. If these conditions are met, the developer must submit Form EIA-860 directly to the EIA, annually, between the first business day of January and the last business day of February. For proposed projects, the filing should reflect the most up to date information available at the time the filing is made. Form EIA-860; Form EIA-860 Instructions. For example:

Alaska

In Alaska, a hydropower developer may need to respond to the EIA-860 to connect a project to a local or regional transmission or distribution system that supplies power to the public. Form EIA-860 Instructions.

8.11 to 8.15 – Is the Transmission Facility in a National Interest Electric Transmission Corridor?

Under Section 216(a) of the Federal Power Act (16 U.S.C. 824p (a)), the Secretary of Energy is required to conduct a study of electric transmission congestion, issue a report, and if necessary designate any geographic area experiencing transmission capacity constraints or congestion that adversely affects consumers as a National Interest Electric Transmission Corridor (NIETC).

Under Section 216(b) of the Federal Power Act (16 U.S.C. 824p (b)), FERC has jurisdiction over construction permits for transmission facilities in NIETCs used for the transmission of energy in interstate commerce if:

  • A state in which the transmission facility is to be constructed or modified does not have authority to approve the siting of the facility;
  • A state in which the transmission facility is to be constructed or modified does not have authority to consider the interstate benefits expected to be achieved by the proposed construction or modification of the facility;
  • The applicant for a permit is a transmitting utility under the Federal Power Act but does not qualify to apply for a permit or siting approval for the proposed project in a state because the applicant does not serve end-use customers in the state;
  • A state commission or other entity that has authority to approve the siting of the transmission facility has withheld approval for more than one year after the filing of an application seeking approval pursuant to applicable law or one year after the designation of the relevant NIETC, whichever is later (Note: This does not give FERC permitting authority when a state has affirmatively denied a permit application within the one year deadline, see Pedmont Envtl. Council v. FERC, 558 F.3d 304 (4th Cir. 2009); or
  • A state commission or other entity that has authority to approve the siting of the transmission facility has conditioned its approval in such a manner that the proposed construction or modification will not significantly reduce transmission congestion in interstate commerce or is not economically feasible. For more information, see:

FERC Electric Transmission Construction Permit:
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In states in which the DOE has designated an NIETC, the state may have its own NIETC route approval process. This process may be connected or separate from a state coordinated process for siting transmission facilities. The states of Washington and Idaho have processes applicable to NIETCs.

8.16 to 8.18 – Will All Associated Transmission Lines Be Sited as Part of the FERC Licensing Process?

If all associated transmission lines will be sited as part of the FERC licensing process (all lines are primary transmission lines), then the developer will not complete a separate process for transmission rights-of-way alone. If all transmission facilities will be sited under a FERC license, no additional permits are needed beyond those for access over state land and interconnection.

However, if any transmission facility will not be sited under a FERC license, the developer will need to follow additional processes for siting and interconnecting transmission facilities. For all transmission not sited as part of the FERC licensing process, whether secondary lines or associated with an exempt project, the developer must obtain all necessary rights-of-way from the appropriate state or federal agency, or individual before construction can begin. Each agency has a different permitting process for transmission rights-of-way. For more information regarding land access approvals, see:

Land Access:
3

8.19 to 8.20 – Does the State Have a Comprehensive Siting Process for Transmission Facilities?

Some states have a process for siting and/or coordinating various reviews and approvals for constructing a transmission facility. These comprehensive siting processes may consider environmental, ecological, scenic, recreational, and historic values of the state. Typically, the state public utility authority (e.g., public utility commission) or a energy, power, or siting board consisting of members from several interested state agencies is charged with conducting these comprehensive siting reviews. Additionally, the developer must comply with any applicable local siting or zoning ordinances.


Alaska

Alaska does not have a comprehensive siting process for transmission facilities. A developer may need to obtain a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity from the Regulatory Commission of Alaska. See 8.23 to 8.24.

Arkansas

Arkansas does not have a comprehensive siting process for transmission facilities. A developer may need to obtain a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity from the Arkansas Public Service Commission. See 8.23 to 8.24.

California

California does not have a comprehensive siting process for transmission facilities. A developer may need to obtain a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity or a Permit to Construct from the California Public Utilities Commission. See 8.23 to 8.24.

Colorado

Colorado does not have a comprehensive siting process for transmission facilities. A developer may need to obtain a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity from the Colorado Public Utilities Commission. See 8.23 to 8.24. A developer may also need additional local siting approvals. See 8.27 to 8.28.

Illinois

Illinois does not have a comprehensive siting process for transmission facilities. A developer may need to obtain a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity from the Illinois Commerce Commission. See 8.23 to 8.24.

Indiana

Indiana does not have a comprehensive siting process for transmission facilities. A developer may need to obtain authority to operate as a public utility from the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission. See 8.23 to 8.24.

Iowa

In Iowa, a hydropower developer must obtain an Electric Transmission Line Franchise from the Iowa Utilities Board to construct transmission lines capable of carrying a voltage of 69kV or greater across public or private lands in the state. For more information, see:

Electric Transmission Line Franchise:
8-IA-a

Kentucky

Kentucky does not have a comprehensive siting process for transmission facilities. A developer may need to obtain a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity from the Kentucky Public Service Commission. See 8.23 to 8.24.

Louisiana

Louisiana does not have a comprehensive siting process for transmission facilities. A developer may need to obtain a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity from the Louisiana Public Service Commission. See 8.23 to 8.24.

Minnesota

In Minnesota, a hydropower developer may need a Route Permit from the Minnesota Public Utility Commission to construct and operate a high-voltage transmission line of 100 kilovolts (kV) or more. Minn. Stat. §216E.03(2). For more information, see:

Transmission Siting Route Permit:
8-MN-a

Mississippi

Mississippi does not have a comprehensive siting process for transmission facilities. A developer may need to obtain a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity from the Mississippi Public Service Commission. See 8.23 to 8.24.

Missouri

Missouri does not have a comprehensive siting process for transmission facilities. A developer may need to obtain a Certificate of Convenience and Necessity from the Missouri Public Service Commission. See 8.23 to 8.24.

New York

New York does not have a comprehensive siting process for transmission facilities. A developer may need to obtain a Certificate of Environmental Compatibility and Public Need from the New York State Public Service Commission. See 8.23 to 8.24.

North Dakota

In North Dakota, a hydropower developer may need a Certificate of Site or Corridor Compatibility from the North Dakota Public Service Commission to construct or operate an electric transmission line that carries voltages in excess of 115 kilovolts (kV) and extends one (1) or more miles in length. For more information, see:

Transmission Siting Overview:
8-ND-a

Ohio

In Ohio, a hydropower developer may need a Certificate of Environmental Compatibility and Public Need from the Ohio Power Siting Board for the construction of a “major utility facility,” including electric transmission lines and associated facilities with a design capacity of 125 kilovolts (kV) or more. O.R.C. § 4906.01; O.R.C. § 4906.04; O.R.C. § 4906.98(A). For more information, see:


Transmission Siting Overview:
8-OH-a

Pennsylvania

In Pennsylvania, a developer may need to obtain an Authorization to Locate and Construct a transmission line from the Pennsylvania Public Utilities Commission before beginning construction. For more information, see:

Transmission Siting Authorization to Locate and Construct:
8-PA-a

Tennessee

Tennessee does not have a comprehensive siting process for transmission facilities. A developer may need to obtain a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity from the Tennessee Public Utility Commission. See 8.23 to 8.24.

Vermont

Vermont does not have a comprehensive siting process for transmission facilities. A developer may need to obtain a Certificate of Public Good from the Vermont Public Service Board. See 8.23 to 8.24.

Washington

In Washington, a hydropower developer may need a Site Certificate to construct a transmission facility of 115 kilovolts (kV) or more. For more information, see:

Transmission Site Certification Agreement:
8-WA-a

West Virginia

West Virginia does not have a comprehensive siting process for transmission facilities. A developer may need to obtain a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity from the West Virginia Public Service Commission. See 8.23 to 8.24.

Wisconsin

Wisconsin does not have a comprehensive siting process for transmission facilities. A developer may need to obtain a Certificate of Authority or a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity from the Wisconsin Public Service Commission. See 8.23 to 8.24.

8.21 to 8.22 – Does the State Have a Role in the Interconnection Process to Connect a Generation Facility to the Grid?

Some states may require the developer to obtain permission before connecting their generation facility to the grid. This process is called interconnection, which differs from state level transmission siting processes. When permission is required, the process varies from state to state, as does the permitting authority.

Alaska

Alaska does not have a state specific interconnection process for generating facilities to connect to the grid.

Arkansas

Arkansas does not have a state specific interconnection process for generating facilities to connect to the grid.

California

In California, a hydropower developer may need to submit an Interconnection Request to California Independent System Operator to connect a generation facility to the California ISO grid. For more information, see:

CAISO Interconnection Request:
8-CA-b

Colorado

Colorado does not have a state specific interconnection process for generating facilities to connect to the grid.

Illinois

Illinois does not have a state specific interconnection process for generating facilities to connect to the grid.

Indiana

Indiana does not have a state specific interconnection process for generating facilities to connect to the grid.

Iowa

Iowa does not have a state specific interconnection process for generating facilities to connect to the grid.

Kentucky

Kentucky does not have a state specific interconnection process for generating facilities to connect to the grid.

Louisiana

Louisiana does not have a state specific interconnection process for generating facilities to connect to the grid.

Minnesota

Minnesota does not have a state specific interconnection process for generating facilities to connect to the grid.

Mississippi

Mississippi does not have a state specific interconnection process for generating facilities to connect to the grid.

Missouri

Missouri does not have a state specific interconnection process for generating facilities to connect to the grid.

New York

In New York, a hydropower developer may need to submit an Interconnection Request to the New York Independent System Operator (NYISO) to connect a new generating facility, or merchant transmission facility to the New York State Transmission System. A developer may also need to submit an Interconnection Request to NYISO for material modifications to an existing large facility or modifications to an existing Interconnection Request. NYISO Transmission Expansion and Interconnection Manual, at § 3.1; NYISO Open Access Transmission Tariff (OATT) §§ 3.9, 4.5.8, 3.11, 4.5.9. For more information, see:

NYISO Interconnection Request:
8-NY-b

North Dakota

North Dakota does not have a state specific interconnection process for generating facilities to connect to the grid.

Ohio

Ohio does not have a state specific interconnection process for generating facilities to connect to the grid.

Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania does not have a state specific interconnection process for generating facilities to connect to the grid.

Tennessee

Tennessee does not have a state specific interconnection process for generating facilities to connect to the grid. The developer may need to file an Interconnection Request with the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) if the transmission facility interconnects with a TVA facility.

Vermont

Vermont does not have a state specific interconnection process for generating facilities to connect to the grid.

Washington

Washington does not have a state specific interconnection process for generating facilities to connect to the grid.

West Virginia

West Virginia does not have a state specific interconnection process for generating facilities to connect to the grid.

Wisconsin

Wisconsin does not have a state specific interconnection process for generating facilities to connect to the grid.

8.23 to 8.24 – Does the Facility Require Approval from a State Utility Regulatory Authority?

Depending on the requirements of the particular state, the developer may need to obtain a Certificate of Public Good (CPG), a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity (CPCN), or other approval from a state utility regulatory authority such as a public utilities commission for transmission line extension projects outside of the FERC license boundary.

In some cases, the CPCN process or equivalent approval for transmission may be combined with the CPCN process for the generation facility. Whether the transmission facility will require a CPCN or equivalent approval differs by state, possible requirements include:

  • Whether the transmission facility is within the a specific kilovolt (kV) threshold requiring regulation; or
  • Whether the developer is regulated by the state utility regulatory authority (e.g., the developer falls under the definition of a “public utility” within the relevant state statute).

Alaska

In Alaska, a hydropower developer may need a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity from the Regulatory Commission of Alaska for transmission line extension projects located outside of a FERC license boundary. For more information, see:

Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity:
8-AK-c

Arkansas

In Arkansas, a hydropower developer may need a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity from the Arkansas Public Service Commission to construct or operate any new equipment or a facility supplying a public service. Ark. Code Ann. §23-3-201(a) (2017); Arkansas PSC Rules of Practice and Procedure, Rule 6.01. For more information, see:

Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity:
8-AR-c

California

In California, a hydropower developer may need a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity from the California Public Utilities Commission to construct a transmission facility of 200 kilovolts (kV) or more. A developer may need a Permit to Construct to construct and operate a transmission lines between 50 kV and 200 kV. For more information, see:

California Public Utilities Commission Permit Overview:
8-CA-c

Colorado

In Colorado, a hydropower developer may need a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity from the Colorado Public Utilities Commission for construction and extension of transmission facilities in the state. For more information, see:

Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity:
8-CO-c

Illinois

In Illinois, a hydropower developer may need a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity from the Illinois Commerce Commission “…prior to any [public] utility construction…” from the Illinois Commerce Commission (“ICC”). Illinois Public Utilities Act (220 I.L.C.S §§ 5 et seq.) For more information, see:

Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity:
8-IL-c

Indiana

In Indiana, a hydropower developer, who does not operate as a public utility in the state of Indiana, but plans to build transmission lines in the state capable of carrying voltages of 100kV or greater, must obtain authority to operate as a public utility from the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission. Afterwards, the developer needs to obtain siting permissions from local authorities where the proposed transmission line will be located. For more information, see:

Authority to Operate as a Public Utility:
8-IN-c

Iowa

Iowa does not require other approval from the public utility commission for transmission line extension projects.

Kentucky

In Kentucky, a hydropower developer may need a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity from the Kentucky Public Service Commission before providing utility service to or for the public or beginning the construction of a plant, equipment, property, or facility. For more information, see:

Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity:
8-KY-c

Louisiana

In Louisiana, a hydropower developer may need a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity from the Louisiana Public Service Commission before constructing a transmission facility. A developer may also need local government approval before constructing a transmission facility. For more information, see:

Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity:
8-LA-c

Minnesota

In Minnesota, a hydropower developer may need a Certificate of Need from the Minnesota Public Utilities Commission to site or construct a large energy facility of 200 kilovolts (kV) or more and greater than (10) miles of its length in Minnesota or that crosses a state line…” or “…any high-voltage transmission line with a capacity of 200 kilovolts or more and greater than 1,500 feet in length...” Minn. Stat. §216B.243(2). For more information, see:

Certificate of Need:
8-MN-c

Mississippi

In Mississippi, a hydropower developer may need a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity from the Mississippi Public Service Commission to construct transmission lines associated with a hydropower facility. For more information, see:

Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity:
8-MS-c

Missouri

In Missouri, a hydropower may need a Certificate of Convenience and Necessity from the Missouri Public Service Commission to construct an electric plant. Mo. Rev. Stat. § 393.170.1. For more information, see:

Certificate of Convenience and Necessity:
8-MO-c

New York

In New York, a hydropower developer may need a Certificate of Environmental Compatibility and Public Need from the New York State Public Service Commission to construct of transmission lines outside of FERC license boundary or for transmission lines associated with a qualifying conduit hydropower facility with a nameplate capacity of 5MW or less. N.Y. Pub. Serv. Law §121(1), Certificate of Environmental Compatibility and Public Need; N.Y. Pub. Serv. Law §120(2), Definitions. For more information, see:

Certificate of Environmental Compatibility and Public Need:
8-NY-c


North Dakota

In North Dakota, a hydropower developer may need a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity from the North Dakota Public Service Commission construct an electric transmission line that carries voltages of 115 kilovolts (kV) or greater and extends more than a mile in length that will connect to an existing transmission line owned by an electric public utility. For more information, see:

Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity:
8-ND-c

Ohio

Ohio does not require hydropower developers to obtain a certificate or approval from the Ohio Public Utilities Commission for transmission extension projects.

Pennsylvania

In Pennsylvania, a hydropower developer may need a Certificate of Public Convenience from the Pennsylvania Public Utilities Commission before operating as a public utility. 66 PA. Const. Stat §102 (1978) . For more information, see:

Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity:
8-PA-c

Tennessee

In Tennessee, a hydropower developer may need a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity from the Tennessee Public Utility Commission to construct a generation or transmission facility. Tenn. Code Ann. §65-4-208(a). For more information, see:

Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity:
8-TN-c

Vermont

In Vermont, a hydropower developer may need a Certificate of Public Good from the Public Service Board for a transmission line extension project, or a group net-metered hydroelectric power system interconnection. For more information, see:

Certificate of Public Good:
8-VT-c

Washington

Washington does not require hydropower developers to obtain a certificate or approval for transmission projects.

West Virginia

In West Virginia, a hydropower developer may need a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity from the West Virginia Public Service Commission to construct a high voltage transmission line over 200 kilovolts (kV). For more information, see:

Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity:
8-WV-c

Wisconsin

In Wisconsin, a hydropower developer may need a Certificate of Authority or a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity from the Wisconsin Public Service Commission to construct a new electric transmission facility. WPSC – Application Filing Requirements for Transmission Line Projects, at p.1. The WPSC has two separate review processes for transmission projects in Wisconsin. The process required depends on the voltage, length, and cost of the project. For more information, see:

Wisconsin Public Service Commission Certificate Overview:
8-WI-c

8.25 to 8.26 – Does the Project Require Any Additional State Approvals?

In addition to comprehensive siting processes or certificates from a public utility commission, state governments may require additional approvals relating to a transmission facility.

Arkansas

In Arkansas, a developer may need a Certificate of Environmental Compatibility and Public Need from the Arkansas Public Service Commission before constructing a major utility facility. A major utility facility is defined, in part, as an electric generation plant and associated transportation facilities capable of operating at a capacity of 50 MW or more. Ark. Code Ann. §23-18-503(6) (1973). For more information, see:

Certificate Environmental Compatibility and Public Need:
8-AR-d

North Dakota

In North Dakota, a hydropower developer may need a Route Permit (also referred to as a Transmission Facility Permit) from the North Dakota Public Service Commission to construct or operate an electric transmission line that carries voltages in excess of 115 kilovolts (kV) and extends one (1) or more miles in length. For more information, see:

Route Permit:
8-ND-d


8.27 to 8.28 – Does the Facility Require Local Approvals?

County and municipal governments play a large role in the transmission facility approval process. In all states, unless superseded by state authority, the developer will be required to comply with local zoning regulations. However, some states grant a larger approval role to local governments. For example, Colorado’s “1041 Regulations” authorize cities and counties to regulate by permit, activities within certain areas of state interest. A developer should consult all counties and municipalities in which the transmission facility will be located to assure compliance with all local regulations.

Colorado

In Colorado, a bulk transmission developer may need approval from the local government with jurisdiction. For more information, see:

Transmission Siting:
8-CO-d

8.29 – Continue with Project







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