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Saskatchewan Provincial Environmental Review (9-SK-a)

Information current as of 2018
In Saskatchewan, a developer must obtain approval from the Minister of the Saskatchewan Ministry of Environment (Ministry) if the project is considered a development and subject to review pursuant to the Saskatchewan Environmental Assessment Act, S.S.A. 1980, c. E-10.1. “Development” means any project, operation or activity, or any alteration or expansion of any project, operation or activity which is likely to:
  • Affect any unique, rare, or endangered feature of the environment;
  • Substantially utilize any provincial resource and in so doing pre-empt the use, or potential use, of that resource for any other purpose;
  • Cause the emission of any pollutants or create by-products, residual or waste products which require handling and disposal in a manner that is not regulated by any other Act or regulation;
  • Cause widespread public concern because of potential environmental changes;
  • Involve a new technology that is concerned with resource utilization and that may induce significant environmental change; or
  • Have a significant impact on the environment or necessitate a further development which is likely to have a significant impact on the environment S.S.A. 1980, c. E-10.1 s. 2(d).


To determine whether a proposed project is a development, the developer must submit a Technical Proposal for screening to the Ministry using the Saskatchewan – Environment Business Service Web Portal. S.S.A. 1980, c. E-10.1 s. 7.2(1. The Environmental Assessment and Stewardship Branch (EASB) screens the project proposal against the six afore-mentioned criteria for determining if a project is a development. If the project is considered a “development” under the Saskatchewan Environmental Assessment Act, S.S.A. 1980, c. E-10.1, the developer must conduct an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) and submit an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to the Minister of Environment for decision. S.S.A. 1980, c. E-10.1 s. 15(1). If the EASB’s screening of a project proposal determines that the project is not a development, the developer may proceed with their project in accordance with their proposal, subject to any conditions that the Minister considers necessary or advisable as well as applicable provincial regulatory requirements (e.g. licenses, permits, leases and approvals). Technical Proposal Guidelines p. 6.



Provincial Environmental Review Process

9-SK-a.1 – Consult Landscape Stewardship Branch

A developer should contact the Saskatchewan Ministry of Environment Environmental Assessment and Stewardship Branch (EASB) to discuss the proposed project and to consider and identify risks associated with the project that may result in it being considered a development, thus requiring an EIA and Ministerial approval prior to proceeding. Technical Proposal Guidelines p. 10.

9-SK-a.2 – Conduct Self-Assessment

A developer should conduct a preliminary self-assessment, prior to submitting a Technical Proposal to the Ministry for review, to assist the developer in gauging whether or not a proposed project may constitute a development and thus be subject to review pursuant to the Saskatchewan Environmental Assessment Act, S.S.A. 1980, c. E-10.1. Technical Proposal Guidelines p. 10. The developer should consider the potential impacts the proposed project may have on the environment and their relative significance prior to submitting a Technical Proposal to the Ministry for review. Technical Proposal Guidelines p. 10. The self-assessment process should begin with a preliminary assessment of the possible impacts of the proposed project on the environment and their relative significance. Significance requires a judgment of the environmental context as well as the intensity of impacts, and their importance to affected communities. Technical Proposal Guidelines p. 10. The Ministry recommends the developer answer the following six (6) questions to evaluate whether a proposed project may be considered to be a development by the Ministry:

  1. Is the proposed project likely to affect any unique, rare or endangered feature of the environment?
  2. Is the proposed project likely to substantially utilize any provincial resource and, in so doing, pre-empt the use, or potential use, of that resource for any other purpose?
  3. Will the proposed project cause the emission of any pollutants or create byproducts, residual or waste products, which will require handling and disposal in a manner that is not regulated under any other Act or regulation?
  4. Is the proposed project likely to cause widespread public concern about potential environmental changes?
  5. Is the proposed project likely to involve new technology that is concerned with resource utilization and that may induce significant environmental change?
  6. Is the proposed project likely to have a significant impact on the environment or necessitate a further development which is likely to have a significant impact on the environment?

For more guidance on the self-assessment questions see Appendix A of Saskatchewan Ministry of Environment – Technical Proposal Guidelines: A Guide to Assessing Projects and Preparing Proposals Under the Environmental Assessment Act. During the self-assessment, a developer should identify potential effects of the project, evaluate the significance of those effects, and plan mitigation and enhancement measures such as:

  • Eliminate or minimize the potential adverse environmental implications;
  • Enhance the predicted positive environmental implications;
  • Anticipate residual impacts, and
  • Address concerns raised by the public or other interested or affected parties.

Technical Proposal Guidelines p. 9.

9-SK-a.3 – Hire a Qualified Person

A developer must hire a qualified person experienced with Saskatchewan circumstances and legislation to assist in evaluating environmental impact assessment requirements. Technical Proposal Guidelines p. 13. The qualified person’s credentials should be included with the Technical Proposal. Technical Proposal Guidelines p. 13. QPs must comply with self-regulating professions. Technical Proposal Guidelines p. 13.

9-SK-a.4 – Technical Proposal

A developer should submit a Technical Proposal to the EASB of the Ministry via the Saskatchewan – Environment Business Service Web Portal for a determination if a proposed project appears to be a development, or if the conclusion is unclear. Technical Proposal Guidelines p. 10. A developer should submit complete information to help ensure that additional information will not be required, and the proposal review will be completed in a timely manner. Technical Proposal Guidelines p. 15. The Technical Proposal must describe the project and identify possible environmental impacts together with any measures planned to reduce or avoid those impacts. Technical Proposal Guidelines p. 15. The Technical Proposal must also illustrate how best management practices will be incorporated into construction, operation, and decommissioning of the project. Technical Proposal Guidelines p. 13. The Technical Proposal requires, at minimum, the following:

  • A description of the project type;
  • A project description;
  • Identification of the industry sector related to the project (e.g. agriculture, energy, forestry, mini, oil and gas);
  • Any previous response from the EASB regarding the proposed project;
  • Contact information for the organization applying;
  • General geographic information; and
  • An overview of research conducted to date and methodology used. Technical Proposal Guidelines p. 15.

The Technical Proposal should also assess the cumulative impacts associated with the proposed project, including:

  • The combined impacts from all stages of the project lifecycle;
  • The effect of the proposed project when added to other past, present, or reasonably foreseeable future projects or activities in the area;
  • The combination of impacts from the existing project combined with the impacts of an expansion or alteration of the project;
  • The total impact or risk of impact from operating the project over a long period of time, including extensions or expansions to the project’s operating life;
  • The effect of ancillary facilities that may not be part of the proponent’s project, but are essential to the project proceeding (e.g. pipelines, roads, transmission lines); and
  • Any additional activities or developments that may be enabled or encouraged as a result of the project proceeding.

Technical Proposal Guidelines p. 14. The EASB may require an applicant (developer) to verify by affidavit any information or material submitted. S.S.A. 1980, c. E-10.1 s. 7.2 (3). Technical Proposal Guidelines p. 6.

9-SK-a.5 to 9-SK-a.6 – Review Technical Proposal for Completeness

The EASB must review the Technical Proposal for administrative and technical completeness. The EASB may require the developer to submit additional information when issues are raised as a result of the review. Technical Proposal Guidelines p. 14.

9-SK-a.7 to 9-SK-a.10 – Review Technical Proposal for Determination

The EASB reviews the Technical Proposal against the six section 2(d) criteria from The Environmental Assessment Act to determine whether the project is a development pursuant to the Saskatchewan Environmental Assessment Act, S.S.A. 1980, c. E-10.. S.S.A. 1980, c. E-10.1 s. 7.3 (1). If the Ministry decides that that the project is a development, the applicant (developer) must not proceed with the development until they have completed and submitted an Environmental Impact Statement for the Minister’s review and approval. S.S.A. 1980, c. E-10.1 s. 9. If the Ministry decides that the project is not a development, approval is not needed to proceed with the development. S.S.A. 1980, c. E-10.1 s. 7.6. In deciding, the Ministry may impose any terms and conditions on the applicant (developer). S.S.A. 1980, c. E-10.1 s. 7.3 (3) . A developer must comply with any terms or conditions imposed by the Ministry. S.S.A. 1980, c. E-10.1 s. 7.3 (4). The Ministry provides formal notification stating whether the proposed project is a development within ten (10) business days. S.S.A. 1980, c. E-10.1 s. 7.4.

9-SK-a.11 – Provide Public Notice of Environmental Impact Assessment

The Minister must give immediate notice when an EIA is about to be conducted. S.S.A. 1980, c. E-10.1 s. 10 (4).

9-SK-a.12 – Terms of Reference

While not legislatively required, it is strongly encouraged that proponents prepare and submit a draft Terms of Reference (TOR) to the EASB for review and approval to ensure licensing and permitting requirements and their corresponding studies are adequately captured in order to avoid delays due to insufficient information for decision-making. Terms of Reference Guidelines p. 6. The TOR outlines the information the developer must gather during the EIA and how a developer will present that information to the EASB in the EIS. Terms of Reference Guidelines p. 6. There are six major sections of the TOR, which include: the proposed project overview, valued ecosystem components, EIA, decommissioning, public engagement, and commitments register. For more information see: Saskatchewan Ministry of Environment – A Guide to Developing the Terms of Reference for a Development Under the Environmental Assessment Act.

Proposed Project Overview

A developer should provide a clear and detailed description of the proposed project. All phases of the project should be described from planning through to construction, operation and decommissioning. Terms of Reference Guidelines p. 8. The project description should:

  • Provide the company profile, name of the legal entity, project contact person, and mailing address;
  • Identify the location of the proposed project and provide maps identifying both the project site study area and the local study area in relation to nearby communities;
  • Identify other past, present, or reasonably foreseeable future projects carried out in the study area;
  • Provide appropriately-scaled maps and/or drawings of the project components and activities;
  • Describe the activities associated with construction, operation, and decommissioning and provide figures illustrating the magnitude of these activities;
  • Describe the capital construction phase and note the duration of the proposed project in years; and
  • Describe the benefits of the proposed project including jobs created, local training, employment and business opportunities.

Terms of Reference Guidelines p. 8.

Valued Ecosystem Components

A developer must include an assessment of project impacts on the biophysical and socio-economic environment focused on valued ecosystem components (VECs) in the TOR. Terms of Reference Guidelines p. 10. VECs are environmental attributes identified as having a legal, scientific, cultural, economic or aesthetic value. Terms of Reference Guidelines p. 10. The TOR should list the VECs that will be considered during the EIA. VECs must have the potential to be affected by the project and be susceptible to change as a result of project-related activities, including the potential for cumulative effects on the VEC in conjunction with other past, present, or reasonably foreseeable future projects or activities in the area. Terms of Reference Guidelines p. 10. A developer should include local communities, First Nations and Métis communities, as well as area planning resources when identifying VECs to list in the TOR during TOR development. Terms of Reference Guidelines p. 10.

  • VECs for the biophysical environment may include but are not limited to:
    • air quality and noise;
    • geology;
    • hydrogeology;
    • hydrology
    • aquatic ecology and wetlands;
    • vegetation;
    • wildlife and wildlife habitat;
    • biodiversity; and
    • terrain and soil.

Terms of Reference Guidelines p. 11.

  • VECs for the socio-economic environment may include, but are not limited to:
    • land-use and management (including reasonably foreseeable future land-uses);
    • historic and heritage resources;
    • traditional land-use;
    • human health and safety; and
    • socio-economics (e.g., social and cultural conditions, aesthetics, transportation navigation, housing, employment and economic diversification). Terms of Reference Guidelines p. 11.

Environmental Impact Assessment

In the EIA section of the TOR, the developer should commit to providing the following information for each identified VEC in the EIS: Baseline information

  • Baseline information to be collected and the methods proposed for collecting this data;
  • A description of the existing environment with respect to VECs selected for the project to illustrate current environmental conditions. Terms of Reference Guidelines p. 12.

Impact Assessment

  • Methods the developer will use to assess the potential impacts of the project;
  • Information from local communities to identify impacts to VECs in a project area;
  • Each potential impact’s magnitude, geographic extent, duration, frequency, reversibility, and likelihood of occurrence for the construction, operation, decommissioning and reclamation phases of the proposed project;
  • The ability of the local environment to accept change;
  • Influence of other developments in the area might have on the proposed development or on the VECs;
  • Whether the project-specific impacts on the identified VECs, combined with the impacts from other past, present, or reasonably foreseeable future projects or activities in the regional study area will result in any cumulative environmental impacts in the short or long-term;
  • Determine how the natural environment could affect the proposed project such as seasonal variation, severe weather events, climate change, forest fires and the implications for the VECs in the area. Terms of Reference Guidelines p. 13.

Impact Mitigation and Monitoring

  • Detailed discussion of the mitigation measures that will be implemented to address the possible projects-specific and cumulative impacts;
  • A contingency plan addressing impacts that the natural environment could have on the project, as well as other incidents or malfunctions that may occur during all phases of the proposed development;
  • An explanation of any adverse impacts resulting from the project that cannot be mitigated. Terms of Reference Guidelines p. 13.
  • Monitoring must include, but is not limited to:
    • construction and operation (to ensure compliance with regulatory requirements);
    • evaluating the success of prevention and mitigation measures.
    • confirming or refuting anticipated impacts in the EIS;
    • evaluating the effectiveness in addressing public issues and concerns; and
    • evaluating the effectiveness in addressing Aboriginal issues and concerns. Terms of Reference Guidelines p. 13.

Residual Impacts

  • Describe any potential for residual impacts on VECs after mitigation measures have been implemented.
  • Assess the significance of any potential residual impacts by identifying each impact’s magnitude, geographic extent, duration and frequency, reversibility and likelihood of occurrence. Terms of Reference Guidelines p. 13.

Decommissioning, Reclamation Institutional Control

A developer should describe the key elements of decommissioning, reclamation, abandonment and financial assurance assessment plans in the TOR including:

Conceptual Decommission Plan

  • A developer should describe the conceptual decommissioning plans for the proposed project EIS including:
    • decommissioning objectives;
    • preferred procedures for decommissioning;
    • alternative procedures for decommissioning site facilities;
    • decommissioning, reclamation and closure of all related works and surface disturbance;
    • identification of acceptable post-operation land-use operations for the project site;
    • post operational landforms and hydrology;
    • environmental impact mitigation and reclamation measures;
    • proposed monitoring to determine if species will re-occupy the site; and
    • proposed contingency measures.

Terms of Reference Guidelines p. 14.

Reclamation

  • A developer should provide details of their proposed reclamation programs in the EIS; and
  • All disturbed sites should be reclaimed as soon as possible after disturbance and operation procedures should be identified.

Terms of Reference Guidelines p. 14.

Institutional Control

  • A developer should include proposed criteria for closing the project and associated infrastructure, and any commitments for monitoring decommissioning success prior to final closure. Provisions for long-term institutional control may include, but are not limited to:
    • record keeping or archival of documentation that fully describes past operations;
    • post-closure site monitoring and verification;
    • passive site management needs;
    • land controls; and
    • long-term financial liabilities for monitoring, reporting, care, and maintenance as well as possible contingency remediation.

Terms of Reference Guidelines p. 14-15.

Public Engagement and Consultation Plan

  • A developer must submit a plan outlining the engagement activities that they will undertake with the general public, First Nations, Métis communities, and interested stakeholder organizations. Terms of Reference Guidelines p. 15.

Public Involvement

  • A developer should provide a plan for how they will solicit public input in the project area and utilize knowledge of the local environment during the EIA including:
    • identify the groups they will engage, which should include landowners, community associations, municipal governments, First Nations and Métis communities, regional planning agencies, businesses and special interest groups;
    • hold public meetings and/or open houses in local communities to describe the details of the project and receive feedback on potential issues, interests, and concerns related to the project;
    • maintain a stakeholder engagement contact list of interested persons or organizations that wish to be notified directly by the Ministry for the formal 30-day public review period.

Terms of Reference Guidelines p. 15.

Duty to Consult First Nations and Métis

The consultation obligation should be set out in the TOR including:

  • Various procedural aspects of consultation to assist the province in fulfilling its duty to consult.
  • A separate plan for consultation with potentially-impacted First Nations and Métis communities;
  • The draft consultation plan should capture the procedural aspects of consultation that have been assigned, and at a minimum include:
    • a list of First Nations and Métis communities to be consulted;
    • consultation objectives;
    • general description of the consultation process, including a description of the delivery methods for providing project-specific information to potentially-impacted First Nations and Métis communities; and
    • strategies for maintaining records and reporting on consultation activities to the EA Branch and First Nations and Métis communities.
  • A developer should work with First Nations and Métis communities to consider relevant ecological, traditional or other knowledge by conducting project-specific traditional knowledge and/or use studies and incorporating the information into the EIS. To ensure that appropriate VECs are selected for impact assessment and that relevant information is provided in the EIS preliminary discussions between a developer and potentially-impacted First Nations and Métis communities should focus on:
    • areas of the community’s traditional territory that are located inside the regional study area;
    • treaty or Aboriginal rights and traditional uses, which arise in connection with the proposed development, and the potential impacts on these rights and uses;
    • actions that could be taken or measures that could be used in the design and/or operation of the proposed development that would assist in avoiding or reducing potential impacts to Treaty or Aboriginal rights and traditional uses within a community’s traditional territory; and
    • any other environmental impacts of concern.

Terms of Reference Guidelines p. 16.

Commitments Register

A developer should provide a commitments register in the EIS. Terms of Reference Guidelines p. 17. The commitments register outlines each commitment made to prevent or mitigate the environmental impacts of the preferred alternative and to meet any regulatory requirements. Terms of Reference Guidelines p. 17. The commitments register should also include specific commitments for monitoring. Terms of Reference Guidelines p. 17. Commitments must be specific, measurable, achievable, and reportable. Terms of Reference Guidelines p. 17. Where appropriate, the developer may refer to acceptable guidelines indicating the tolerances for determining whether a commitment has been met. Terms of Reference Guidelines p. 17. During project implementation, the developer should make all guideline material available to the personnel responsible for implementing a commitment and ensure that the material is available on demand by and auditor or government agency. Terms of Reference Guidelines p. 17.

9-SK-a.13 to 9-SK-a.14 – Review Terms of Reference for Deficiencies

The Saskatchewan Environmental Assessment Review Panel (SEARP) must review the Terms of Reference (TOR) submitted by the developer for deficiencies within 30-calendar days. Technical Review Guidelines p. 8. SEARP is a panel consisting of representatives from various provincial ministries and agencies with environmental and socio-economic interests or responsibilities who provide the multidisciplinary expertise required to adequately evaluate potential environmental impacts from proposed developments. Technical Review Guidelines p. 8. Review by SEARP assists the EASB to ensure all pertinent environmental issues are addressed in an EIA and that all necessary information is adequately documented in the EIS. Technical Review Guidelines p. 8. If the TOR contains deficiencies, the EASB sends the TOR back to the developer for modification. Members of SEARP must evaluate the TOR with regards to:

  • Types of information included;
  • Detailed studies;
  • Analysis;
  • Reporting; and
  • Monitoring.

Technical Review Guidelines p. 8

9-SK-a.15 – Consult with Indigenous Peoples

The Ministry may need to consult with and accommodate First Nations and rights-bearing Métis communities in advance of decisions or actions which may adversely impact Treaty and Aboriginal rights. First Nation and Métis Consultation Policy Framework p. 3. The Ministry must consult with affected First Nations and Métis Communities when the project triggers the duty to consult. Proponent Handbook p. 10. When determining if consultation is required and that subsequent level of consultation activity that may be appropriate, the Ministry will consider:

  • If the decision or action being contemplated has the potential to adversely impact a Treaty and/or Aboriginal right and/or traditional use;
  • The duration or length of time the potential adverse effect may persist; and
  • The magnitude or extent of the potential adverse impact.

Consultation Policy Framework p. 9. Where the duty to consult is triggered, the Ministry has an obligation to ensure First Nations and Métis communities are appropriately consulted and accommodated in accordance with Consultation Policy Framework in advance of issuing authorizations. While the Government of Saskatchewan is responsible and ultimately accountable for managing and implementing the Duty to Consult, the proponent will be assigned procedural aspects of consultation to help ensure a direct, efficient and timely exchange of information among all parties and contribute to a meaningful and effective process of consultation. The ministry will determine the completeness of the Duty to Consult process, including consultation on impacts and identification of accommodations where necessary. A developer may be expected to participate in Government meetings with potentially impacts First Nations and Métis communities to discuss potential impacts of the proposed activity. Consultation Policy Framework p. 8. A developer is responsible for the costs associated with their engagement in consultation processes and procedural aspects that may be assigned to them by the Ministry, as well as any necessary adjustments or actions to project activities required to avoid, minimize or mitigate adverse impacts on Treaty and Aboriginal rights and traditional uses. Consultation Policy Framework p. 8.

9-SK-a.16 – Conduct Environmental Impact Assessment

A developer must conduct an Environmental Impact Assessment in accordance with the accepted Terms of Reference and submit an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to the EASB for review for completeness.

9-SK-a.17 – Environmental Impact Statement

The EIS must, at minimum:

  • State the potential environmental (e.g. biophysical, social, cultural and economic) impacts of the development;
  • Provide analysis of alternative approaches to avoid or lessen the impacts;
  • Outline the steps the developer must take to avoid or minimize the impacts of the preferred approach; and
  • Identify residual effects and mitigation measures.

Technical Review Guidelines p. 8. A developer should apply time and effort to data collection and interpretation of the most significant impacts of the project. Terms of Reference Guidelines p. 17. The developer must provide a citation within the text and a complete reference at the end of the EIS where external sources of information or data are used. Terms of Reference Guidelines p. 18. Where conclusions are cited from other reports that are critical to the assessment of environmental impacts, the developer must provide enough detail about the original data and analysis, to enable critical review of the material. Terms of Reference Guidelines p. 18.

9-SK-a.18 to 9-SK-a.19 – Review Environmental Impact Statement for Completeness

The EASB must review the EIS for administrative and technical completeness. If the EIS is found to be lacking important information, the EASB prepares a summary of deficiencies and information gaps. Environmental Assessment in Saskatchewan p. 7. A developer may be required to conduct additional studies or provide additional information to address the deficiencies and submit a revised EIS, which typically involves a submission of an addendum to the initial EIS. Environmental Assessment in Saskatchewan p. 7. The EASB organizes information deficiencies into four categories:

Type I

Deficiencies sufficiently important to justify withholding a decision under the Saskatchewan Environmental Assessment Act, S.S.A. 1980, c. E-10.1 or related to information necessary for a complete understanding of project-related effects and basic environmental trade -offs associated with a development, must be addressed prior to the EIS being released for public review.

Type II

Deficiencies not considered sufficiently important to justify withholding a decision, but which, should an approval be granted, must be resolved before subsequent regulatory approvals are issued.

Type III

Relatively minor issues, clarification of which will add to the quality and accuracy of the EIS.

Type IV

Poor phrasing or representation of developer’s commitments that could create problems for compliance or enforcement of commitments. Environmental Assessment in Saskatchewan p. 7.

9-SK-a.20 – Coordinate Technical Review

The EASB coordinates an interdepartmental and intergovernmental technical review of the EIS through SEARP. Environmental Assessment in Saskatchewan p. 7.

9-SK-a.21 – Conduct Technical Review

SEARP must complete a technical review of the developer’s EIS within 30-calendar days. Environmental Assessment in Saskatchewan p. 7. SEARP considers:

  • Whether the EIS addresses the requirements identified in the TOR in an acceptable manner;
  • Whether the likely impacts of the project are accurately reflected in the EIS;
  • Whether adequate prevention and mitigation measures for the project are proposed in the EIS;
  • The significance of the development’s impacts, based on the agency’s technical expertise;
  • The ability of the proposed development to meet legal and regulatory requirements related to environmental protection;
  • Any policy, program, or regulatory implications related to a decision on a development; and
  • Any First Nations or Métis consultation that has been or is being undertaken and/or will be required for subsequent permits and/or approvals. Environmental Assessment in Saskatchewan p. 7.

9-SK-a.22 – Prepare Technical Review Comments

The EASB prepares technical review comments to assist the public in reviewing the EIS and the government decision-makers in evaluating the environmental acceptability of the project. Environmental Assessment in Saskatchewan p. 7. Technical review comments provide information regarding potential environmental impacts, the significance of those impacts and the effectiveness of the proposed mitigation measures. Environmental Assessment in Saskatchewan p. 7.

9-SK-a.23 – Publish Public Notice

The Ministry must publish public notice of the EIS and associated documents and provide an opportunity for the public to comment on the project. The Ministry must publish notice of the comment period in the local newspapers where the project is sited. Saskatchewan Ministry of Environment – Public Participation in Saskatchewan’s Environmental Assessment Process. The Ministry makes copies of the EIS and associated documents available for viewing at local municipal offices and on the government website. Saskatchewan Ministry of Environment – Public Participation in Saskatchewan’s Environmental Assessment Process. The EASB maintains an online database and all projects currently undergoing an EIA that require public comment. Saskatchewan Ministry of Environment – Public Participation in Saskatchewan’s Environmental Assessment Process.

9-SK-a.24 – Public Comment on EIS

Any person may submit written comments on proposed project and associated regulatory filings (i.e., EIS) within the prescribed 30 to 60-day comment period. The written comments must include the commenter’s name and preferred method of contact. Saskatchewan Ministry of Environment – Public Participation in Saskatchewan’s Environmental Assessment Process. The public may submit written comments by mail, fax, or e-mail to speak to public priorities including land, water, air, wildlife, and cultural interactions with the environment. Saskatchewan Ministry of Environment – Public Participation in Saskatchewan’s Environmental Assessment Process; Saskatchewan Ministry of Environment – Public Participation in Saskatchewan’s Environmental Assessment Process.

9-SK-a.25 – Review Public Comments

EASB receives and compiles public comments received regarding a project’s EIS. Public comments are taken into consideration by the Minister when making his or her decision to approve or reject a project. Saskatchewan Ministry of Environment – Public Participation in Saskatchewan’s Environmental Assessment Process.

9-SK-a.26 to 9-SK-a.28 – Review Project for Approval

The Minister reviews the public comments, EIS and the technical review comments provided by SEARP when making a decision to approve or refuse to approve a project. If approving a project, the Minister may impose any terms and conditions that he considers necessary or advisable. S.S.A. 1980, c. E-10.1 s. 15 (1).

  • The design of the project;
  • The developer’s commitments to mitigate likely impacts; and
  • The constraints that may be placed on the project through subsequent regulatory requirements, or the Ministry’s ability to constrain the project through conditions of approval. Environmental Assessment in Saskatchewan p. 9.

The Minister shall give notice of his decision, together with written reasons for the decisions to the proponent, any person who made a written submission to the Minister during the public comment period and any other persons that the minister considers advisable.

9-SK-a.29 – Annual Report

A developer should submit an Annual Report describing the progress made on meeting each condition of approval. Terms of Reference Guidelines p. 18. The Annual Report should be brief and should not contain details of models, monitoring or other data except where necessary to indicate the status of a commitment. Terms of Reference Guidelines p. 19. The Annual Report must include, at minimum:

  • Provide a description of any significant accidents or spills and the responses that were taken;
  • Indicate how effectively commitments are being met;
  • Describe any malfunctions, including impacts of the environment on the project that may prevent commitments from being met;
  • Describe any corrective actions (approved by the appropriate government agencies) where a commitment has not, or cannot be met;
  • Include an updated version of the commitments register;
  • Justify the reasons for any commitment that might not be, or has not been met; and
  • Provide an assessment (where appropriate) on whether the commitment is sufficiently addressing the intended environmental protection or mitigation objectives.

Terms of Reference Guidelines p. 19.


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