Sigurd Red Butte No2

From Open Energy Information


NEPA Document Collection for: Sigurd Red Butte No2
EIS

Sigurd to Red Butte No. 2 345kV Transmission Project

Proposed Action

BLM: The BLM is proposing to grant the Proponent right-of-way across the federal lands they administer to accommodate the Proponent’s proposed Project for a lease term of 30 years with right to renew.

The Proponent’s Proposed Action is to construct, operate, and maintain a single-circuit 345kV transmission line from the existing Sigurd Substation, located north of Richfield, in Sevier County, Utah, to the existing Red Butte Substation, located west of Central, in Washington County, Utah. Permanent facilities would include: -A single-circuit, alternating current 345kV overhead transmission line (including structures, shield wires, conductors, and insulators) between the Sigurd Substation and Red Butte Substation -Communication regeneration stations associated with the transmission line -Access roads to the 345kV transmission line structures where needed and where there is no existing access -New substation equipment at terminus points to interconnect the Project with the existing Sigurd and Red Butte substations

The Proposed Action and Project description are presented in detail in Chapter 2, Sections 2.2 and 2.3, of the Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS).

USFS: The USFS is proposing to authorize the Proponent to cross the federal lands they administer to accommodate the Proponent’s proposed Project for a period of 30 years with right to renewal. -The Proponent’s Proposed Action is to construct, operate, and maintain a single-circuit 345kV transmission line from the existing Sigurd Substation, located north of Richfield, in Sevier County, Utah, to the existing Red Butte Substation, located west of Central, in Washington County, Utah. -A single-circuit, alternating current 345kV overhead transmission line (including structures, shield wires, conductors, and insulators) between the Sigurd Substation and Red Butte Substation  Communication regeneration stations associated with the transmission line -Access roads to the 345kV transmission line structures where needed and where there is no existing access -New substation equipment at terminus points to interconnect the Project with the existing Sigurd and Red Butte substations -The Proposed Action and Project description are presented in detail in Chapter 2, Sections 2.2 and 2.3, of the Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS).

Conditions of Approval

BLM: This Project includes the following measures, terms, and conditions: -Monitoring and mitigation measures outlined in Chapter 3 and Appendix F of the Final EIS and the POD (refer to Appendix B of this ROD); -Terms and conditions in the Programmatic Agreement that are provided in Appendix 3 of the Programmatic Agreement; -Mitigation measures that would be implemented to eliminate or minimize impacts on greater sage-grouse as outlined in Appendix F of the Final EIS and included in the approved Compensatory Mitigation Plan for Greater Sage-Grouse (Rocky Mountain Power 2012); and -Standard terms, conditions, and stipulations (43 CFR 2800).

Before BLM will issue a notice to proceed with construction, the Proponent must post a financial security (such as a surety bond, letter of credit, etc.) with the BLM in an amount sufficient to cover all post-fieldwork costs associated with implementing the Historic Properties Treatment Plan (HPTP), or other mitigation activities, to be required by the Proponent when they contract for services in support of the Programmatic Agreement and for reclamation requirements and activities.

The Proponent will provide for an environmental compliance inspection contractor (CIC), to be approved by the BLM and USFS, to represent the BLM and USFS during the onstruction and reclamation phases of the Project. The CIC will report directly to the BLM. The primary role and responsibility of the CIC is to ensure compliance with all terms, conditions, and stipulations of the right-of-way grant, the POD, and other permits, approvals and regulatory requirements, as described in Section 1.9 of the Final EIS and Section 1.6 of the POD (refer to Appendix B of this ROD). Additionally, the CIC shall follow the Environmental Compliance Management Plan, included as Appendix A6 of the POD.

The Proponent also will be responsible for monitoring the reclamation of the transmission line, temporary access roads, and ancillary facilities, as described in Appendix B14 (Reclamation, Revegetation, and Monitoring Framework Plan), and for compliance with Appendix B10 Noxious Weed Management Plan) of the POD.

USFS: As required by the standard terms of the special-use authorization, initiation of construction is conditioned upon final USFS approval of the POD.

As a requirement of the standard terms of the special-use permit authorization and the POD, the Proponent will provide for an environmental compliance inspection contractor (CIC), to be approved by the BLM, as lead federal agency, and USFS, to represent the BLM and USFS during the construction and reclamation phases of the Project. The CIC will report directly to the BLM, as lead federal agency, in coordination with USFS. The primary role and responsibility of the CIC is to ensure compliance with all terms, conditions, and stipulations of special-use authorization, the POD, and other permits, approvals and regulatory requirements, as described in Section 1.9 of the Final EIS and Section 1.6 of the POD (refer to Appendix B of this Record of Decision). Additionally, the CIC shall follow the Environmental Compliance Management Plan, included as Appendix A6 of the POD. The Proponent also will be responsible for monitoring the reclamation of the transmission line, temporary access roads, and ancillary facilities, as described in Appendix B14 (Reclamation, Revegetation, and Monitoring Framework Plan), and for compliance with Appendix B10 Noxious Weed Management Plan) of the POD.

Data Completion Notes

Preliminary SF299, POD, Scoping Document, and other important project documents located here: http://www.blm.gov/ut/st/en/fo/cedar_city/planning/sigurd_to_red_butte.html

Documents

Application:




EA/EIS Report:



 


"{{{NEPA_Resources}}}" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.
[[BulkTransmission/{{{NEPA_Resources}}}|{{{NEPA_Resources}}}]]
"NEPA_Resource_Analysis" is not in the list of possible values (Not Present, Present, Not Affected, Present, Potentially Affected, Not Indicated) for this property.
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CloseDesign Features of the Proposed Action for Environmental Protection:
  • In consultation with appropriate land-management agencies and the State Historic Preservation Office, and in accordance with the Programmatic Agreement (to comply with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act) entered into by the Proponent, BLM, USFS, and the State of Utah (Section 5.2.2.2 and Appendix G), specific mitigation measures for cultural resources would be developed and documented in the Historic Property Treatment Plan. The Historic Property Treatment Plan will be implemented to mitigate any identified adverse impacts. These may include Project modifications to avoid adverse impacts, monitoring of construction activities, and data recovery studies. Project modifications for avoidance would be the preferred method for preventing adverse effects on historic properties.
  • All construction vehicle movement outside the right-of-way normally would be restricted to predesignated access, contractor-acquired access, or public roads.
  • The spatial limits of construction activities would be predetermined with activity restricted to and confined within those limits. No paint or permanent discoloring agents indicating survey or construction limits would be applied to rocks, vegetation, structures, fences, etc.
  • Prior to construction, the compliance inspection contractor would instruct all personnel on the protection of cultural, ecological, and other natural resources such as: (a) federal and state laws regarding antiquities and plants and wildlife, including collection and removal; (b) the importance of these resources; and (c) the purpose and necessity of protecting them.
CloseDesign Features of the Proposed Action for Environmental Protection:
  • Disturbance to Sensitive Soils and Vegetation: Existing access roads/trails would not be widened or otherwise upgraded for construction and maintenance in areas determined by the land-management agency, where soils and vegetation are particularly sensitive to disturbance, except in areas where repairs are necessary to make existing roads/trails passable and safe.
  • Sensitive Resources Avoidance: There would be no blading of new access roads in select areas of sensitive resources (e.g., perennial streams, riparian areas, and trails) during construction (or maintenance). Existing crossings will be used at perennial streams, national recreational trails, and irrigation channels. Existing or overland access routes are to be used for construction and maintenance in these select areas. To minimize ground disturbance, overland routes must be flagged with easily seen markers, and the route must be approved in advance of use by the landowner or Authorized Officer.
  • Minimize Slope Cut and Fill: The alignment of any new access roads or cross-country routes in designated areas would follow the landform contours where practicable to minimize ground disturbance and/or reduce scarring (visual contrast) of the landscape, providing that such alignment does not affect other resource values.
  • Minimize Tree Clearing: Clearing of trees in and adjacent to the right-of-way would be minimized to limit disturbance to timber resources, reduce visual contrast, and protect raptor nesting habitat, to the extent practicable to satisfy conductor-clearance requirements (i.e., PacifiCorp Vegetation Management Standards 2007). Trees and other vegetation would be removed selectively (e.g., edge feathering) to blend the edge of the right-of-way into adjacent vegetation patterns, as practicable and appropriate. Trees would be removed selectively in riparian habitats to protect biological resources, including raptor nesting habitat.
  • Tower Design Modification: The tower design may be modified or an alternative tower type may be used to minimize visual contrast or to address site-specific constraints (e.g., terrain, airports, raptor perching, etc.), if practical and consistent with PacifiCorp standards.
  • Span and/or Avoid Sensitive Features: Within the limits of standard tower design and in conformance with engineering and PacifiCorp requirements, structures would be located to allow conductors to clearly span identified sensitive features. Structures would be placed so as to avoid sensitive features (e.g., wetlands, riparian areas, water courses, hazardous substance remediation, noxious weeds, and cultural sites). Avoidance measures may include selective tower placement, spanning sensitive features, or realigning access routes.
  • Match Transmission Line Spans: Standard tower design would be modified to correspond with spacing of existing transmission line structures of the same voltage, where feasible and within limits of standard tower design, to reduce visual contrast and/or potential operational conflicts. The normal span would be modified to correspond with existing towers, but not necessarily at every location.
  • Maximum Span at Crossings: At highway, canyon, and trail crossings, towers would be placed at the maximum feasible distance from the crossing within limits of standard tower design and in conformance with engineering and PacifiCorp requirements to reduce visual impacts and potential impacts on recreation values and to increase safety at these locations.
  • Helicopter Construction: Helicopter placement of towers during construction and helicopter patrol and maintenance could be used where practicable to reduce surface impacts in environmental constraint areas or steep terrain locations. For example, within the inventoried roadless areas, the Project would be constructed by helicopter-only construction methods and supported by overland travel. Helicopters would transport personnel, drilling equipment, towers, and other construction materials to and from the right-of-way and would be used for wire pulling and tensioning.
  • Minimize Right-of-Way Clearing: Clearing of the right-of-way would be minimized to reduce visual contrast and avoid sensitive features including, but not limited to, land uses, biological resources, and cultural sites. In select areas, the right-of-way width may be modified (within the limits of PacifiCorp Vegetation Management Standards and standard tower design) to protect sensitive resources, but current land uses would be allowed to continue unabated, provided the use meets applicable standards.
  • Blend Road Cuts or Grading: To reduce visual contrast, mineral or asphalt emulsions (e.g., PermeonTM or approved equivalent) would be applied in rocky areas where newly-exposed rock color would create strong landscape contrast.
"{{{NEPA_Resources}}}" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.
[[BulkTransmission/{{{NEPA_Resources}}}|{{{NEPA_Resources}}}]]
"NEPA_Resource_Analysis" is not in the list of possible values (Not Present, Present, Not Affected, Present, Potentially Affected, Not Indicated) for this property.
"{{{NEPA_Resources}}}" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.

 

CloseDesign Features of the Proposed Action for Environmental Protection:
  • A Fire Protection Plan would be developed and incorporated into the POD, which would be approved by the BLM and USFS prior to the issuance of a right-of-way grant or special-use authorization, respectively.
 
"{{{NEPA_Resources}}}" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.
[[BulkTransmission/{{{NEPA_Resources}}}|{{{NEPA_Resources}}}]]
"NEPA_Resource_Analysis" is not in the list of possible values (Not Present, Present, Not Affected, Present, Potentially Affected, Not Indicated) for this property.
"{{{NEPA_Resources}}}" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.

 

CloseDesign Features of the Proposed Action for Environmental Protection:
  • In construction areas where recontouring is not required, vegetation would be left in place wherever possible, and original contour would be maintained to avoid excessive root damage and allow for resprouting. Vegetation not consistent with minimum clearance distances between trees and transmission lines must be maintained for line safety and reliability (required by North American Electric Reliability Corporation’s Transmission Vegetation Management Program [2009; 2008; 2006]).
  • In temporary construction areas (e.g., marshalling yards, tower site work areas) where ground disturbance is significant or where recontouring is required, surface reclamation would occur as required by the landowner or land-management agency. The method of reclamation normally would consist of, but is not limited to, returning disturbed areas back to their natural contour, reseeding, installing cross drains for erosion control, placing water bars in the road, and filling ditches.

All areas on lands administered by Bureau of Land Management (BLM) or U.S. Forest Service (USFS) disturbed as a part of the construction and/or maintenance of the proposed transmission line would be reseeded with a seed mixture appropriate for those areas. The BLM or USFS would prescribe a seed mixture that fits each range site. Seeding methods would typically include drill seeding, where practicable; however, the BLM or USFS may recommend broadcast seeding as an alternative method in some cases. Drill seeding for all Project areas outside the jurisdiction of the BLM Cedar City Field Office would be performed during September 1 through December 15 to maximize the chance of success. Within the jurisdiction of the BLM Cedar City Field office, drill seeding would be performed October 15 through December 15. Where broadcast seeding is implemented, seed would be applied at 1.5 to 2 times the rate of drill seeding application, and the seed would be covered by a method such as harrowing or raking.

A Reclamation, Revegetation, and Monitoring Framework Plan identifying reclamation stipulations would be developed and incorporated in the Plan of Development (POD), which would be approved by the BLM and USFS prior to the issuance of a right-of-way grant or special-use authorization, respectively.

  • The right-of-way would be free of non-biodegradable debris. Slash would be left in place or disposed of in accordance with requirements of the land-management agency or landowner.
  • In newly disturbed temporary work areas, any soil removed would be salvaged and distributed and contoured evenly over the surface of the disturbed area after construction completion. The soil surface would be left rough to help reduce potential wind erosion.
  • Grading would be minimized by driving overland within pre-designated work areas whenever possible.
  • All construction vehicle movement outside the right-of-way normally would be restricted to predesignated access, contractor-acquired access, or public roads.
  • The spatial limits of construction activities would be predetermined with activity restricted to and confined within those limits. No paint or permanent discoloring agents indicating survey or construction limits would be applied to rocks, vegetation, structures, fences, etc.
  • All requirements of those entities having jurisdiction over air quality matters would be adhered to. Any necessary dust control plans would be developed and permits for construction activities would be obtained. Open burning of construction trash would not be allowed, unless permitted by appropriate authorities.
CloseDesign Features of the Proposed Action for Environmental Protection:
  • Disturbance to Sensitive Soils and Vegetation: Existing access roads/trails would not be widened or otherwise upgraded for construction and maintenance in areas determined by the land-management agency, where soils and vegetation are particularly sensitive to disturbance, except in areas where repairs are necessary to make existing roads/trails passable and safe.
  • Sensitive Resources Avoidance: There would be no blading of new access roads in select areas of sensitive resources (e.g., perennial streams, riparian areas, and trails) during construction (or maintenance). Existing crossings will be used at perennial streams, national recreational trails, and irrigation channels. Existing or overland access routes are to be used for construction and maintenance in these select areas. To minimize ground disturbance, overland routes must be flagged with easily seen markers, and the route must be approved in advance of use by the landowner or Authorized Officer.
  • Minimize Slope Cut and Fill: The alignment of any new access roads or cross-country routes in designated areas would follow the landform contours where practicable to minimize ground disturbance and/or reduce scarring (visual contrast) of the landscape, providing that such alignment does not affect other resource values.
  • Minimize New or Improved Accessibility: To limit new or improved access into the Project area, all new or improved access (e.g., blading and widening existing access) that would not be required for maintenance would be closed or rehabilitated using the most effective and least environmentally damaging methods, appropriate to that area and developed through consultation with the landowner or land-management agency. Methods for road closure or management include installing and locking gates, obstructing the path (e.g., earthen berms and boulders), revegetating the surface of the roadbed to make it less apparent, or restoring the road to its natural contour and vegetation.
  • Helicopter Construction: Helicopter placement of towers during construction and helicopter patrol and maintenance could be used where practicable to reduce surface impacts in environmental constraint areas or steep terrain locations. For example, within the inventoried roadless areas, the Project would be constructed by helicopter-only construction methods and supported by overland travel. Helicopters would transport personnel, drilling equipment, towers, and other construction materials to and from the right-of-way and would be used for wire pulling and tensioning.
  • Overland Access: The Construction Contractor would use overland access to the greatest extent possible in areas where no grading would be needed to access work areas. Overland access would consist of drive-and-crush and/or clear-and-cut travel. Drive-and-crush is vehicular travel to access a site without significantly modifying the landscape. Vegetation is crushed but not cropped. Soil is compacted, but no surface soil is removed. Clear-and-cut is considered as brushing off (removal) of all vegetation to improve or provide suitable access for equipment. Methods for removal of vegetation would include mowing (brush hog flail-type mower), hand clearing with small tools such as loppers and chain saws, and back dragging a cat blade above the surface of the soil to remove surface vegetation. Soils could be compacted, but no surface soil would be removed. Prior to work beginning, overland access routes would be staked to a minimum width of 14 feet and as specified in the Plan of Development.
"{{{NEPA_Resources}}}" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.
[[BulkTransmission/{{{NEPA_Resources}}}|{{{NEPA_Resources}}}]]
"NEPA_Resource_Analysis" is not in the list of possible values (Not Present, Present, Not Affected, Present, Potentially Affected, Not Indicated) for this property.
"{{{NEPA_Resources}}}" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.

 

CloseDesign Features of the Proposed Action for Environmental Protection:
  • On agricultural land, the right-of-way would be aligned, insofar as is practicable, to reduce the impact on farm operations and agricultural production.
  • The Proponent would respond to complaints of line-generated radio or television interference by investigating the complaints and implementing appropriate mitigation measures where possible. The transmission lines would be patrolled by air or inspected on the ground on a periodic basis, in compliance with the Proponent’s standards, so damaged insulators or other line materials that could cause interference are repaired or replaced.
  • Fences, gates, and walls would be replaced, repaired, or reclaimed to their original condition as required by the landowner or the land-management agency in the event they are removed, damaged, or destroyed by construction activities. Fences would be braced before cutting. Temporary gates or enclosures would be installed only with the permission of the landowner or the land-management agency and would be removed/reclaimed following construction. Cattle guards or permanent access gates would be installed where new permanent access roads cut through fences on BLM-and USFS-administered lands.
  • In cultivated agricultural areas, soil compacted by construction activities would be de-compacted. Construction activities would occur as practical to minimize impacts on agricultural operations.
  • All construction vehicle movement outside the right-of-way normally would be restricted to predesignated access, contractor-acquired access, or public roads.
  • The spatial limits of construction activities would be predetermined with activity restricted to and confined within those limits. No paint or permanent discoloring agents indicating survey or construction limits would be applied to rocks, vegetation, structures, fences, etc.
  • All requirements of those entities having jurisdiction over air quality matters would be adhered to. Any necessary dust control plans would be developed and permits for construction activities would be obtained. Open burning of construction trash would not be allowed, unless permitted by appropriate authorities.
CloseDesign Features of the Proposed Action for Environmental Protection:
  • Disturbance to Sensitive Soils and Vegetation: Existing access roads/trails would not be widened or otherwise upgraded for construction and maintenance in areas determined by the land-management agency, where soils and vegetation are particularly sensitive to disturbance, except in areas where repairs are necessary to make existing roads/trails passable and safe.
  • Minimize Tree Clearing: Clearing of trees in and adjacent to the right-of-way would be minimized to limit disturbance to timber resources, reduce visual contrast, and protect raptor nesting habitat, to the extent practicable to satisfy conductor-clearance requirements (i.e., PacifiCorp Vegetation Management Standards 2007). Trees and other vegetation would be removed selectively (e.g., edge feathering) to blend the edge of the right-of-way into adjacent vegetation patterns, as practicable and appropriate. Trees would be removed selectively in riparian habitats to protect biological resources, including raptor nesting habitat.
  • Minimize New or Improved Accessibility: To limit new or improved access into the Project area, all new or improved access (e.g., blading and widening existing access) that would not be required for maintenance would be closed or rehabilitated using the most effective and least environmentally damaging methods, appropriate to that area and developed through consultation with the landowner or land-management agency. Methods for road closure or management include installing and locking gates, obstructing the path (e.g., earthen berms and boulders), revegetating the surface of the roadbed to make it less apparent, or restoring the road to its natural contour and vegetation.
  • Tower Design Modification: The tower design may be modified or an alternative tower type may be used to minimize visual contrast or to address site-specific constraints (e.g., terrain, airports, raptor perching, etc.), if practical and consistent with PacifiCorp standards.
  • Span and/or Avoid Sensitive Features: Within the limits of standard tower design and in conformance with engineering and PacifiCorp requirements, structures would be located to allow conductors to clearly span identified sensitive features. Structures would be placed so as to avoid sensitive features (e.g., wetlands, riparian areas, water courses, hazardous substance remediation, noxious weeds, and cultural sites). Avoidance measures may include selective tower placement, spanning sensitive features, or realigning access routes.
  • Maximum Span at Crossings: At highway, canyon, and trail crossings, towers would be placed at the maximum feasible distance from the crossing within limits of standard tower design and in conformance with engineering and PacifiCorp requirements to reduce visual impacts and potential impacts on recreation values and to increase safety at these locations.
  • Helicopter Construction: Helicopter placement of towers during construction and helicopter patrol and maintenance could be used where practicable to reduce surface impacts in environmental constraint areas or steep terrain locations. For example, within the inventoried roadless areas, the Project would be constructed by helicopter-only construction methods and supported by overland travel. Helicopters would transport personnel, drilling equipment, towers, and other construction materials to and from the right-of-way and would be used for wire pulling and tensioning.
  • Minimize Right-of-Way Clearing: Clearing of the right-of-way would be minimized to reduce visual contrast and avoid sensitive features including, but not limited to, land uses, biological resources, and cultural sites. In select areas, the right-of-way width may be modified (within the limits of PacifiCorp Vegetation Management Standards and standard tower design) to protect sensitive resources, but current land uses would be allowed to continue unabated, provided the use meets applicable standards.
  • Overland Access: The Construction Contractor would use overland access to the greatest extent possible in areas where no grading would be needed to access work areas. Overland access would consist of drive-and-crush and/or clear-and-cut travel. Drive-and-crush is vehicular travel to access a site without significantly modifying the landscape. Vegetation is crushed but not cropped. Soil is compacted, but no surface soil is removed. Clear-and-cut is considered as brushing off (removal) of all vegetation to improve or provide suitable access for equipment. Methods for removal of vegetation would include mowing (brush hog flail-type mower), hand clearing with small tools such as loppers and chain saws, and back dragging a cat blade above the surface of the soil to remove surface vegetation. Soils could be compacted, but no surface soil would be removed. Prior to work beginning, overland access routes would be staked to a minimum width of 14 feet and as specified in the Plan of Development.
  • Limit Accessibility in Sensitive Habitats: Where feasible, access roads that traverse sensitive habitats (e.g., crucial winter range) would be gated or otherwise blocked to limit public access.
"{{{NEPA_Resources}}}" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.
[[BulkTransmission/{{{NEPA_Resources}}}|{{{NEPA_Resources}}}]]
"NEPA_Resource_Analysis" is not in the list of possible values (Not Present, Present, Not Affected, Present, Potentially Affected, Not Indicated) for this property.
"{{{NEPA_Resources}}}" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.

 

CloseDesign Features of the Proposed Action for Environmental Protection:
  • If construction and maintenance activities could not be avoided in the primary nesting season for migratory birds, migratory bird and nest surveys would be performed. A 100-foot construction buffer around each active nest would be implemented.
CloseDesign Features of the Proposed Action for Environmental Protection:
  • Minimize Right-of-Way Clearing: Clearing of the right-of-way would be minimized to reduce visual contrast and avoid sensitive features including, but not limited to, land uses, biological resources, and cultural sites. In select areas, the right-of-way width may be modified (within the limits of PacifiCorp Vegetation Management Standards and standard tower design) to protect sensitive resources, but current land uses would be allowed to continue unabated, provided the use meets applicable standards.
  • Seasonal Wildlife Restrictions: To minimize disturbance to wildlife during sensitive periods, construction and maintenance activities would be restricted for the listed wildlife in designated areas unless exception to the stipulation is granted by the agency in accordance with agency policy or land use plans (e.g., receiving clearance to proceed from a biological monitor):

‘’Migratory Birds’’

    • Spatial buffers and seasonal restrictions for nesting raptor in accordance with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) Utah Field Office Guidelines for Raptor Protection From Human and Land Use Disturbances (construction restrictions range from December 1 to September 30, depending on the species)(Romin and Muck 2002)
    • No construction or maintenance activities within the FWS’s recommendation of 100 feet from nesting (nonraptor) migratory birds from February 15 to July 31 (FWS 2011a)
    • Spatial buffers and seasonal restrictions for roosting bald eagles in accordance with FWS Utah Field Office Guidelines for Raptor Protection From Human and Land Use Disturbances will be followed from November 1 to March 31 (Romin and Muck 2002)
  • Flight Diverters: Shield wires, guy wires, and overhead optical ground wire along portions of the transmission line that have a high potential for avian collisions would be marked with flight diverters or other BLM-or U.S. Forest Service-approved devices in accordance with agency requirements. Portions of the transmission line that cross through, or are adjacent to, waterfowl and general migratory pathways or habitat for high priority avian species (i.e., sage-grouse) may be marked to reduce the risk of avian collisions. The specific segments to be marked would be determined in consultation with the appropriate agencies.
"{{{NEPA_Resources}}}" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.
[[BulkTransmission/{{{NEPA_Resources}}}|{{{NEPA_Resources}}}]]
"NEPA_Resource_Analysis" is not in the list of possible values (Not Present, Present, Not Affected, Present, Potentially Affected, Not Indicated) for this property.
"{{{NEPA_Resources}}}" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.

 

CloseDesign Features of the Proposed Action for Environmental Protection:
  • Transmission line materials that have been designed and tested to minimize corona would be used. A bundle configuration and larger conductors would be used to limit audible noise, radio interference, and television interference due to corona. Tension would be maintained on all insulator assemblies to ensure positive contact between insulators, thereby avoiding sparking. Caution would be exercised during construction to avoid scratching or nicking the conductor surface, which may provide points for corona to occur.
 
"{{{NEPA_Resources}}}" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.
[[BulkTransmission/{{{NEPA_Resources}}}|{{{NEPA_Resources}}}]]
"NEPA_Resource_Analysis" is not in the list of possible values (Not Present, Present, Not Affected, Present, Potentially Affected, Not Indicated) for this property.
"{{{NEPA_Resources}}}" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.

 

CloseDesign Features of the Proposed Action for Environmental Protection:
  • In consultation with appropriate land-management agencies, specific mitigation measures for paleontological resources would be developed and implemented to mitigate any identified adverse impacts. These measures would include:
    • preparation of a Paleontological Resources Treatment Plan
    • paleontological surveys
    • education of construction personnel
    • monitoring ground disturbance
    • curation
    • deposition in a paleontological repository.
  • All construction vehicle movement outside the right-of-way normally would be restricted to predesignated access, contractor-acquired access, or public roads.
  • The spatial limits of construction activities would be predetermined with activity restricted to and confined within those limits. No paint or permanent discoloring agents indicating survey or construction limits would be applied to rocks, vegetation, structures, fences, etc.
CloseDesign Features of the Proposed Action for Environmental Protection:
  • Helicopter Construction: Helicopter placement of towers during construction and helicopter patrol and maintenance could be used where practicable to reduce surface impacts in environmental constraint areas or steep terrain locations. For example, within the inventoried roadless areas, the Project would be constructed by helicopter-only construction methods and supported by overland travel. Helicopters would transport personnel, drilling equipment, towers, and other construction materials to and from the right-of-way and would be used for wire pulling and tensioning.
"{{{NEPA_Resources}}}" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.
[[BulkTransmission/{{{NEPA_Resources}}}|{{{NEPA_Resources}}}]]
"NEPA_Resource_Analysis" is not in the list of possible values (Not Present, Present, Not Affected, Present, Potentially Affected, Not Indicated) for this property.
"{{{NEPA_Resources}}}" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.

 

CloseDesign Features of the Proposed Action for Environmental Protection:
  • The Proponent would continue to follow studies performed on electric and magnetic field research. The Proponent relies on the findings of public health specialists and international scientific organizations for guidelines regarding electric and magnetic fields.
  • Transmission line materials that have been designed and tested to minimize corona would be used. A bundle configuration and larger conductors would be used to limit audible noise, radio interference, and television interference due to corona. Tension would be maintained on all insulator assemblies to ensure positive contact between insulators, thereby avoiding sparking. Caution would be exercised during construction to avoid scratching or nicking the conductor surface, which may provide points for corona to occur.
  • The Proponent would apply grounding or other methods where possible to eliminate problems of induced currents and voltages onto conductive objects sharing the same right-of-way, to meet the appropriate codes.
  • The transmission line would be patrolled regularly and properly maintained in compliance with applicable safety codes.
  • Towers and/or conductors and/or shield wires would be marked with high-visibility devices (i.e., marker balls or other marking devices) where required by governmental agencies with jurisdiction (i.e., Federal Aviation Administration). Tower heights would be less than 200 feet to avoid the need for aircraft obstruction lighting.
  • Prior to construction, the compliance inspection contractor would instruct all personnel on the protection of cultural, ecological, and other natural resources such as: (a) federal and state laws regarding antiquities and plants and wildlife, including collection and removal; (b) the importance of these resources; and (c) the purpose and necessity of protecting them.
 
"{{{NEPA_Resources}}}" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.
[[BulkTransmission/{{{NEPA_Resources}}}|{{{NEPA_Resources}}}]]
"NEPA_Resource_Analysis" is not in the list of possible values (Not Present, Present, Not Affected, Present, Potentially Affected, Not Indicated) for this property.
"{{{NEPA_Resources}}}" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.

 

CloseDesign Features of the Proposed Action for Environmental Protection:
  • The right-of-way would be free of non-biodegradable debris. Slash would be left in place or disposed of in accordance with requirements of the land-management agency or landowner.
  • In newly disturbed temporary work areas, any soil removed would be salvaged and distributed and contoured evenly over the surface of the disturbed area after construction completion. The soil surface would be left rough to help reduce potential wind erosion.
  • Grading would be minimized by driving overland within pre-designated work areas whenever possible.
CloseDesign Features of the Proposed Action for Environmental Protection:
  • Disturbance to Sensitive Soils and Vegetation: Existing access roads/trails would not be widened or otherwise upgraded for construction and maintenance in areas determined by the land-management agency, where soils and vegetation are particularly sensitive to disturbance, except in areas where repairs are necessary to make existing roads/trails passable and safe.
  • Sensitive Resources Avoidance: There would be no blading of new access roads in select areas of sensitive resources (e.g., perennial streams, riparian areas, and trails) during construction (or maintenance). Existing crossings will be used at perennial streams, national recreational trails, and irrigation channels. Existing or overland access routes are to be used for construction and maintenance in these select areas. To minimize ground disturbance, overland routes must be flagged with easily seen markers, and the route must be approved in advance of use by the landowner or Authorized Officer.
  • Minimize Slope Cut and Fill: The alignment of any new access roads or cross-country routes in designated areas would follow the landform contours where practicable to minimize ground disturbance and/or reduce scarring (visual contrast) of the landscape, providing that such alignment does not affect other resource values.
  • Minimize New or Improved Accessibility: To limit new or improved access into the Project area, all new or improved access (e.g., blading and widening existing access) that would not be required for maintenance would be closed or rehabilitated using the most effective and least environmentally damaging methods, appropriate to that area and developed through consultation with the landowner or land-management agency. Methods for road closure or management include installing and locking gates, obstructing the path (e.g., earthen berms and boulders), revegetating the surface of the roadbed to make it less apparent, or restoring the road to its natural contour and vegetation.
  • Helicopter Construction: Helicopter placement of towers during construction and helicopter patrol and maintenance could be used where practicable to reduce surface impacts in environmental constraint areas or steep terrain locations. For example, within the inventoried roadless areas, the Project would be constructed by helicopter-only construction methods and supported by overland travel. Helicopters would transport personnel, drilling equipment, towers, and other construction materials to and from the right-of-way and would be used for wire pulling and tensioning.
  • Overland Access: The Construction Contractor would use overland access to the greatest extent possible in areas where no grading would be needed to access work areas. Overland access would consist of drive-and-crush and/or clear-and-cut travel. Drive-and-crush is vehicular travel to access a site without significantly modifying the landscape. Vegetation is crushed but not cropped. Soil is compacted, but no surface soil is removed. Clear-and-cut is considered as brushing off (removal) of all vegetation to improve or provide suitable access for equipment. Methods for removal of vegetation would include mowing (brush hog flail-type mower), hand clearing with small tools such as loppers and chain saws, and back dragging a cat blade above the surface of the soil to remove surface vegetation. Soils could be compacted, but no surface soil would be removed. Prior to work beginning, overland access routes would be staked to a minimum width of 14 feet and as specified in the Plan of Development.
"{{{NEPA_Resources}}}" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.
[[BulkTransmission/{{{NEPA_Resources}}}|{{{NEPA_Resources}}}]]
"NEPA_Resource_Analysis" is not in the list of possible values (Not Present, Present, Not Affected, Present, Potentially Affected, Not Indicated) for this property.
"{{{NEPA_Resources}}}" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.

 

CloseDesign Features of the Proposed Action for Environmental Protection:
  • In temporary construction areas (e.g., marshalling yards, tower site work areas) where ground disturbance is significant or where recontouring is required, surface reclamation would occur as required by the landowner or land-management agency. The method of reclamation normally would consist of, but is not limited to, returning disturbed areas back to their natural contour, reseeding, installing cross drains for erosion control, placing water bars in the road, and filling ditches.

All areas on lands administered by Bureau of Land Management (BLM) or U.S. Forest Service (USFS) disturbed as a part of the construction and/or maintenance of the proposed transmission line would be reseeded with a seed mixture appropriate for those areas. The BLM or USFS would prescribe a seed mixture that fits each range site. Seeding methods would typically include drill seeding, where practicable; however, the BLM or USFS may recommend broadcast seeding as an alternative method in some cases. Drill seeding for all Project areas outside the jurisdiction of the BLM Cedar City Field Office would be performed during September 1 through December 15 to maximize the chance of success. Within the jurisdiction of the BLM Cedar City Field office, drill seeding would be performed October 15 through December 15. Where broadcast seeding is implemented, seed would be applied at 1.5 to 2 times the rate of drill seeding application, and the seed would be covered by a method such as harrowing or raking.

A Reclamation, Revegetation, and Monitoring Framework Plan identifying reclamation stipulations would be developed and incorporated in the Plan of Development (POD), which would be approved by the BLM and USFS prior to the issuance of a right-of-way grant or special-use authorization, respectively.

  • Special status species, threatened and endangered species, or other species of particular concern would be considered in accordance with management policies set forth by appropriate land-management agencies (e.g., BLM,

USFS, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Utah Division of Wildlife Resources, etc.). This would entail conducting surveys for plant and wildlife species of concern along the proposed transmission line route and associated facilities (e.g., access and spur roads, staging areas, etc.) as agreed on by the agencies. In cases where such species are identified, appropriate action would be taken to avoid adverse impacts on the species and its habitat. These actions may include altering the placement of roads or towers, where practicable as approved by the landowner and compliance inspection contractor, as well as monitoring activities, implementation of Project speed limits, and other restrictions.

  • To prevent the spread of noxious/invasive weeds, a Noxious Weed Management Plan would be developed and incorporated into the POD, which would be approved by the BLM and USFS prior to the issuance of a right-of-way grant or special-use authorization, respectively.
  • Based on preconstruction surveys, federally designated sensitive plants and/or habitat would be flagged and structures placed to allow spanning of these features, where feasible, within the limits of standard structure design.
  • All construction vehicle movement outside the right-of-way normally would be restricted to predesignated access, contractor-acquired access, or public roads.
  • The spatial limits of construction activities would be predetermined with activity restricted to and confined within those limits. No paint or permanent discoloring agents indicating survey or construction limits would be applied to rocks, vegetation, structures, fences, etc.
  • Prior to construction, the compliance inspection contractor would instruct all personnel on the protection of cultural, ecological, and other natural resources such as: (a) federal and state laws regarding antiquities and plants and wildlife, including collection and removal; (b) the importance of these resources; and (c) the purpose and necessity of protecting them.
CloseDesign Features of the Proposed Action for Environmental Protection:
  • Disturbance to Sensitive Soils and Vegetation: Existing access roads/trails would not be widened or otherwise upgraded for construction and maintenance in areas determined by the land-management agency, where soils and vegetation are particularly sensitive to disturbance, except in areas where repairs are necessary to make existing roads/trails passable and safe.
  • Sensitive Resources Avoidance: There would be no blading of new access roads in select areas of sensitive resources (e.g., perennial streams, riparian areas, and trails) during construction (or maintenance). Existing crossings will be used at perennial streams, national recreational trails, and irrigation channels. Existing or overland access routes are to be used for construction and maintenance in these select areas. To minimize ground disturbance, overland routes must be flagged with easily seen markers, and the route must be approved in advance of use by the landowner or Authorized Officer.
  • Minimize Slope Cut and Fill: The alignment of any new access roads or cross-country routes in designated areas would follow the landform contours where practicable to minimize ground disturbance and/or reduce scarring (visual contrast) of the landscape, providing that such alignment does not affect other resource values.
  • Minimize New or Improved Accessibility: To limit new or improved access into the Project area, all new or improved access (e.g., blading and widening existing access) that would not be required for maintenance would be closed or rehabilitated using the most effective and least environmentally damaging methods, appropriate to that area and developed through consultation with the landowner or land-management agency. Methods for road closure or management include installing and locking gates, obstructing the path (e.g., earthen berms and boulders), revegetating the surface of the roadbed to make it less apparent, or restoring the road to its natural contour and vegetation.
  • Span and/or Avoid Sensitive Features: Within the limits of standard tower design and in conformance with engineering and PacifiCorp requirements, structures would be located to allow conductors to clearly span identified sensitive features. Structures would be placed so as to avoid sensitive features (e.g., wetlands, riparian areas, water courses, hazardous substance remediation, noxious weeds, and cultural sites). Avoidance measures may include selective tower placement, spanning sensitive features, or realigning access routes.
  • Helicopter Construction: Helicopter placement of towers during construction and helicopter patrol and maintenance could be used where practicable to reduce surface impacts in environmental constraint areas or steep terrain locations. For example, within the inventoried roadless areas, the Project would be constructed by helicopter-only construction methods and supported by overland travel. Helicopters would transport personnel, drilling equipment, towers, and other construction materials to and from the right-of-way and would be used for wire pulling and tensioning.
  • Minimize Right-of-Way Clearing: Clearing of the right-of-way would be minimized to reduce visual contrast and avoid sensitive features including, but not limited to, land uses, biological resources, and cultural sites. In select areas, the right-of-way width may be modified (within the limits of PacifiCorp Vegetation Management Standards and standard tower design) to protect sensitive resources, but current land uses would be allowed to continue unabated, provided the use meets applicable standards.
"{{{NEPA_Resources}}}" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.
[[BulkTransmission/{{{NEPA_Resources}}}|{{{NEPA_Resources}}}]]
"NEPA_Resource_Analysis" is not in the list of possible values (Not Present, Present, Not Affected, Present, Potentially Affected, Not Indicated) for this property.
"{{{NEPA_Resources}}}" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.

 

CloseDesign Features of the Proposed Action for Environmental Protection:
  • In construction areas where recontouring is not required, vegetation would be left in place wherever possible, and original contour would be maintained to avoid excessive root damage and allow for resprouting. Vegetation not consistent with minimum clearance distances between trees and transmission lines must be maintained for line safety and reliability (required by North American Electric Reliability Corporation’s Transmission Vegetation Management Program [2009; 2008; 2006]).
  • In temporary construction areas (e.g., marshalling yards, tower site work areas) where ground disturbance is significant or where recontouring is required, surface reclamation would occur as required by the landowner or land-management agency. The method of reclamation normally would consist of, but is not limited to, returning disturbed areas back to their natural contour, reseeding, installing cross drains for erosion control, placing water bars in the road, and filling ditches.

All areas on lands administered by Bureau of Land Management (BLM) or U.S. Forest Service (USFS) disturbed as a part of the construction and/or maintenance of the proposed transmission line would be reseeded with a seed mixture appropriate for those areas. The BLM or USFS would prescribe a seed mixture that fits each range site. Seeding methods would typically include drill seeding, where practicable; however, the BLM or USFS may recommend broadcast seeding as an alternative method in some cases. Drill seeding for all Project areas outside the jurisdiction of the BLM Cedar City Field Office would be performed during September 1 through December 15 to maximize the chance of success. Within the jurisdiction of the BLM Cedar City Field office, drill seeding would be performed October 15 through December 15. Where broadcast seeding is implemented, seed would be applied at 1.5 to 2 times the rate of drill seeding application, and the seed would be covered by a method such as harrowing or raking.

A Reclamation, Revegetation, and Monitoring Framework Plan identifying reclamation stipulations would be developed and incorporated in the Plan of Development (POD), which would be approved by the BLM and USFS prior to the issuance of a right-of-way grant or special-use authorization, respectively.

  • Grading would be minimized by driving overland within pre-designated work areas whenever possible.
  • All construction vehicle movement outside the right-of-way normally would be restricted to predesignated access, contractor-acquired access, or public roads.
  • The spatial limits of construction activities would be predetermined with activity restricted to and confined within those limits. No paint or permanent discoloring agents indicating survey or construction limits would be applied to rocks, vegetation, structures, fences, etc.
CloseDesign Features of the Proposed Action for Environmental Protection:
  • Disturbance to Sensitive Soils and Vegetation: Existing access roads/trails would not be widened or otherwise upgraded for construction and maintenance in areas determined by the land-management agency, where soils and vegetation are particularly sensitive to disturbance, except in areas where repairs are necessary to make existing roads/trails passable and safe.
  • Sensitive Resources Avoidance: There would be no blading of new access roads in select areas of sensitive resources (e.g., perennial streams, riparian areas, and trails) during construction (or maintenance). Existing crossings will be used at perennial streams, national recreational trails, and irrigation channels. Existing or overland access routes are to be used for construction and maintenance in these select areas. To minimize ground disturbance, overland routes must be flagged with easily seen markers, and the route must be approved in advance of use by the landowner or Authorized Officer.
  • Minimize Slope Cut and Fill: The alignment of any new access roads or cross-country routes in designated areas would follow the landform contours where practicable to minimize ground disturbance and/or reduce scarring (visual contrast) of the landscape, providing that such alignment does not affect other resource values.
  • Minimize Tree Clearing: Clearing of trees in and adjacent to the right-of-way would be minimized to limit disturbance to timber resources, reduce visual contrast, and protect raptor nesting habitat, to the extent practicable to satisfy conductor-clearance requirements (i.e., PacifiCorp Vegetation Management Standards 2007). Trees and other vegetation would be removed selectively (e.g., edge feathering) to blend the edge of the right-of-way into adjacent vegetation patterns, as practicable and appropriate. Trees would be removed selectively in riparian habitats to protect biological resources, including raptor nesting habitat.
  • Minimize New or Improved Accessibility: To limit new or improved access into the Project area, all new or improved access (e.g., blading and widening existing access) that would not be required for maintenance would be closed or rehabilitated using the most effective and least environmentally damaging methods, appropriate to that area and developed through consultation with the landowner or land-management agency. Methods for road closure or management include installing and locking gates, obstructing the path (e.g., earthen berms and boulders), revegetating the surface of the roadbed to make it less apparent, or restoring the road to its natural contour and vegetation.
  • Tower Design Modification: The tower design may be modified or an alternative tower type may be used to minimize visual contrast or to address site-specific constraints (e.g., terrain, airports, raptor perching, etc.), if practical and consistent with PacifiCorp standards.

9*Maximum Span at Crossings: At highway, canyon, and trail crossings, towers would be placed at the maximum feasible distance from the crossing within limits of standard tower design and in conformance with engineering and PacifiCorp requirements to reduce visual impacts and potential impacts on recreation values and to increase safety at these locations.

  • Helicopter Construction: Helicopter placement of towers during construction and helicopter patrol and maintenance could be used where practicable to reduce surface impacts in environmental constraint areas or steep terrain locations. For example, within the inventoried roadless areas, the Project would be constructed by helicopter-only construction methods and supported by overland travel. Helicopters would transport personnel, drilling equipment, towers, and other construction materials to and from the right-of-way and would be used for wire pulling and tensioning.
  • Minimize Right-of-Way Clearing: Clearing of the right-of-way would be minimized to reduce visual contrast and avoid sensitive features including, but not limited to, land uses, biological resources, and cultural sites. In select areas, the right-of-way width may be modified (within the limits of PacifiCorp Vegetation Management Standards and standard tower design) to protect sensitive resources, but current land uses would be allowed to continue unabated, provided the use meets applicable standards.
  • Overland Access: The Construction Contractor would use overland access to the greatest extent possible in areas where no grading would be needed to access work areas. Overland access would consist of drive-and-crush and/or clear-and-cut travel. Drive-and-crush is vehicular travel to access a site without significantly modifying the landscape. Vegetation is crushed but not cropped. Soil is compacted, but no surface soil is removed. Clear-and-cut is considered as brushing off (removal) of all vegetation to improve or provide suitable access for equipment. Methods for removal of vegetation would include mowing (brush hog flail-type mower), hand clearing with small tools such as loppers and chain saws, and back dragging a cat blade above the surface of the soil to remove surface vegetation. Soils could be compacted, but no surface soil would be removed. Prior to work beginning, overland access routes would be staked to a minimum width of 14 feet and as specified in the Plan of Development.
  • Blend Road Cuts or Grading: To reduce visual contrast, mineral or asphalt emulsions (e.g., PermeonTM or approved equivalent) would be applied in rocky areas where newly-exposed rock color would create strong landscape contrast.
"{{{NEPA_Resources}}}" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.
[[BulkTransmission/{{{NEPA_Resources}}}|{{{NEPA_Resources}}}]]
"NEPA_Resource_Analysis" is not in the list of possible values (Not Present, Present, Not Affected, Present, Potentially Affected, Not Indicated) for this property.
"{{{NEPA_Resources}}}" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.

 

CloseDesign Features of the Proposed Action for Environmental Protection:
  • Avoid construction and maintenance activities during the migratory bird nesting season, typically between February 15 and July 31; however, dates may vary depending on species, current environmental conditions, results of preconstruction surveys, and approval by agency biologists or agency-approved environmental inspectors in coordination with agency biologists.
  • All construction vehicle movement outside the right-of-way normally would be restricted to predesignated access, contractor-acquired access, or public roads.

26*The spatial limits of construction activities would be predetermined with activity restricted to and confined within those limits. No paint or permanent discoloring agents indicating survey or construction limits would be applied to rocks, vegetation, structures, fences, etc.

  • Prior to construction, the compliance inspection contractor would instruct all personnel on the protection of cultural, ecological, and other natural resources such as: (a) federal and state laws regarding antiquities and plants and wildlife, including collection and removal; (b) the importance of these resources; and (c) the purpose and necessity of protecting them.
CloseDesign Features of the Proposed Action for Environmental Protection:
  • Disturbance to Sensitive Soils and Vegetation: Existing access roads/trails would not be widened or otherwise upgraded for construction and maintenance in areas determined by the land-management agency, where soils and vegetation are particularly sensitive to disturbance, except in areas where repairs are necessary to make existing roads/trails passable and safe.
  • Sensitive Resources Avoidance: There would be no blading of new access roads in select areas of sensitive resources (e.g., perennial streams, riparian areas, and trails) during construction (or maintenance). Existing crossings will be used at perennial streams, national recreational trails, and irrigation channels. Existing or overland access routes are to be used for construction and maintenance in these select areas. To minimize ground disturbance, overland routes must be flagged with easily seen markers, and the route must be approved in advance of use by the landowner or Authorized Officer.
  • Span and/or Avoid Sensitive Features: Within the limits of standard tower design and in conformance with engineering and PacifiCorp requirements, structures would be located to allow conductors to clearly span identified sensitive features. Structures would be placed so as to avoid sensitive features (e.g., wetlands, riparian areas, water courses, hazardous substance remediation, noxious weeds, and cultural sites). Avoidance measures may include selective tower placement, spanning sensitive features, or realigning access routes.
"{{{NEPA_Resources}}}" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.
[[BulkTransmission/{{{NEPA_Resources}}}|{{{NEPA_Resources}}}]]
"NEPA_Resource_Analysis" is not in the list of possible values (Not Present, Present, Not Affected, Present, Potentially Affected, Not Indicated) for this property.
"{{{NEPA_Resources}}}" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.

 

CloseDesign Features of the Proposed Action for Environmental Protection:
  • All construction vehicle movement outside the right-of-way normally would be restricted to predesignated access, contractor-acquired access, or public roads.
  • The spatial limits of construction activities would be predetermined with activity restricted to and confined within those limits. No paint or permanent discoloring agents indicating survey or construction limits would be applied to rocks, vegetation, structures, fences, etc.
  • Prior to construction, the compliance inspection contractor would instruct all personnel on the protection of cultural, ecological, and other natural resources such as: (a) federal and state laws regarding antiquities and plants and wildlife, including collection and removal; (b) the importance of these resources; and (c) the purpose and necessity of protecting them.
CloseDesign Features of the Proposed Action for Environmental Protection:
  • Disturbance to Sensitive Soils and Vegetation: Existing access roads/trails would not be widened or otherwise upgraded for construction and maintenance in areas determined by the land-management agency, where soils and vegetation are particularly sensitive to disturbance, except in areas where repairs are necessary to make existing roads/trails passable and safe.
  • Sensitive Resources Avoidance: There would be no blading of new access roads in select areas of sensitive resources (e.g., perennial streams, riparian areas, and trails) during construction (or maintenance). Existing crossings will be used at perennial streams, national recreational trails, and irrigation channels. Existing or overland access routes are to be used for construction and maintenance in these select areas. To minimize ground disturbance, overland routes must be flagged with easily seen markers, and the route must be approved in advance of use by the landowner or Authorized Officer.
  • Span and/or Avoid Sensitive Features: Within the limits of standard tower design and in conformance with engineering and PacifiCorp requirements, structures would be located to allow conductors to clearly span identified sensitive features. Structures would be placed so as to avoid sensitive features (e.g., wetlands, riparian areas, water courses, hazardous substance remediation, noxious weeds, and cultural sites). Avoidance measures may include selective tower placement, spanning sensitive features, or realigning access routes.
"{{{NEPA_Resources}}}" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.
[[BulkTransmission/{{{NEPA_Resources}}}|{{{NEPA_Resources}}}]]
"NEPA_Resource_Analysis" is not in the list of possible values (Not Present, Present, Not Affected, Present, Potentially Affected, Not Indicated) for this property.
"{{{NEPA_Resources}}}" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.

 

CloseDesign Features of the Proposed Action for Environmental Protection:
  • Special status species, threatened and endangered species, or other species of particular concern would be considered in accordance with management policies set forth by appropriate land-management agencies (e.g., BLM, USFS, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Utah Division of Wildlife Resources, etc.). This would entail conducting surveys for plant and wildlife species of concern along the proposed transmission line route and associated facilities (e.g., access and spur roads, staging areas, etc.) as agreed on by the agencies. In cases where such species are identified, appropriate action would be taken to avoid adverse impacts on the species and its habitat. These actions may include altering the placement of roads or towers, where practicable as approved by the landowner and compliance inspection contractor, as well as monitoring activities, implementation of Project speed limits, and other restrictions.
  • The Proponent designs and constructs all new or rebuilt transmission facilities to its raptor-safe design standards, including Suggested Practices for Avian Protection on Power Lines; The State of the Art in 2006 (Avian Power Line Interaction Committee2006); PacifiCorp’s Bird Management Program Guidelines, updated June 2011 (PacifiCorp

2011). New substations or modified portions of the existing substations must incorporate animal protections in accordance with PacifiCorp standards.

  • To prevent the spread of noxious/invasive weeds, a Noxious Weed Management Plan would be developed and incorporated into the POD, which would be approved by the BLM and USFS prior to the issuance of a right-of-way grant or special-use authorization, respectively.
  • Follow U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service guidelines for raptor protection during the breeding season.
  • All construction vehicle movement outside the right-of-way normally would be restricted to predesignated access, contractor-acquired access, or public roads.
  • The spatial limits of construction activities would be predetermined with activity restricted to and confined within those limits. No paint or permanent discoloring agents indicating survey or construction limits would be applied to rocks, vegetation, structures, fences, etc.
  • Prior to construction, the compliance inspection contractor would instruct all personnel on the protection of cultural, ecological, and other natural resources such as: (a) federal and state laws regarding antiquities and plants and wildlife, including collection and removal; (b) the importance of these resources; and (c) the purpose and necessity of protecting them.
CloseDesign Features of the Proposed Action for Environmental Protection:
  • Sensitive Resources Avoidance: There would be no blading of new access roads in select areas of sensitive resources (e.g., perennial streams, riparian areas, and trails) during construction (or maintenance). Existing crossings will be used at perennial streams, national recreational trails, and irrigation channels. Existing or overland access routes are to be used for construction and maintenance in these select areas. To minimize ground disturbance, overland routes must be flagged with easily seen markers, and the route must be approved in advance of use by the landowner or Authorized Officer.
  • Minimize Tree Clearing: Clearing of trees in and adjacent to the right-of-way would be minimized to limit disturbance to timber resources, reduce visual contrast, and protect raptor nesting habitat, to the extent practicable to satisfy conductor-clearance requirements (i.e., PacifiCorp Vegetation Management Standards 2007). Trees and other vegetation would be removed selectively (e.g., edge feathering) to blend the edge of the right-of-way into adjacent vegetation patterns, as practicable and appropriate. Trees would be removed selectively in riparian habitats to protect biological resources, including raptor nesting habitat.
  • Minimize New or Improved Accessibility: To limit new or improved access into the Project area, all new or improved access (e.g., blading and widening existing access) that would not be required for maintenance would be closed or rehabilitated using the most effective and least environmentally damaging methods, appropriate to that area and developed through consultation with the landowner or land-management agency. Methods for road closure or management include installing and locking gates, obstructing the path (e.g., earthen berms and boulders), revegetating the surface of the roadbed to make it less apparent, or restoring the road to its natural contour and vegetation.
  • Tower Design Modification: The tower design may be modified or an alternative tower type may be used to minimize visual contrast or to address site-specific constraints (e.g., terrain, airports, raptor perching, etc.), if practical and consistent with PacifiCorp standards.
  • Span and/or Avoid Sensitive Features: Within the limits of standard tower design and in conformance with engineering and PacifiCorp requirements, structures would be located to allow conductors to clearly span identified sensitive features. Structures would be placed so as to avoid sensitive features (e.g., wetlands, riparian areas, water courses, hazardous substance remediation, noxious weeds, and cultural sites). Avoidance measures may include selective tower placement, spanning sensitive features, or realigning access routes.
  • Helicopter Construction: Helicopter placement of towers during construction and helicopter patrol and maintenance could be used where practicable to reduce surface impacts in environmental constraint areas or steep terrain locations. For example, within the inventoried roadless areas, the Project would be constructed by helicopter-only construction methods and supported by overland travel. Helicopters would transport personnel, drilling equipment, towers, and other construction materials to and from the right-of-way and would be used for wire pulling and tensioning.
  • Minimize Right-of-Way Clearing: Clearing of the right-of-way would be minimized to reduce visual contrast and avoid sensitive features including, but not limited to, land uses, biological resources, and cultural sites. In select areas, the right-of-way width may be modified (within the limits of PacifiCorp Vegetation Management Standards and standard tower design) to protect sensitive resources, but current land uses would be allowed to continue unabated, provided the use meets applicable standards.
  • Seasonal Wildlife Restrictions: To minimize disturbance to wildlife during sensitive periods, construction and maintenance activities would be restricted for the listed wildlife in designated areas unless exception to the stipulation is granted by the agency in accordance with agency policy or land use plans (e.g., receiving clearance to proceed from a biological monitor):

‘’Big Game’’

    • Coordinate with Utah Division of Wildlife Resources (UDWR) and Bureau of Land Management (BLM) when construction or maintenance activities are planned within pronghorn crucial year-long habitat between April 15 and June 15
    • No construction or maintenance activities within mule deer and elk winter ranges from November 1 to May 15 (UDWR 2010a)
    • No construction or maintenance activities within mule deer crucial summer/fall range from May 1 to June 15 (UDWR 2010a)

‘’Southwestern willow flycatcher’’

    • No construction or maintenance activities in identified habitat for the southwestern willow flycatcher from April 1 to August 30 (BLM 1999)

‘’Utah prairie dog’’

    • No construction or maintenance activities would occur in Utah prairie dog colonies between August 31 and April 1 (FWS 2010a)

‘’Greater sage-grouse’’

    • No construction or maintenance activities within 4.0 miles of a lek between February 15 and July 31
    • No construction or maintenance activities within UDWR-mapped crucial winter habitat between November 15 and March 15
  • Overland Access: The Construction Contractor would use overland access to the greatest extent possible in areas where no grading would be needed to access work areas. Overland access would consist of drive-and-crush and/or clear-and-cut travel. Drive-and-crush is vehicular travel to access a site without significantly modifying the landscape. Vegetation is crushed but not cropped. Soil is compacted, but no surface soil is removed. Clear-and-cut is considered as brushing off (removal) of all vegetation to improve or provide suitable access for equipment. Methods for removal of vegetation would include mowing (brush hog flail-type mower), hand clearing with small tools such as loppers and chain saws, and back dragging a cat blade above the surface of the soil to remove surface vegetation. Soils could be compacted, but no surface soil would be removed. Prior to work beginning, overland access routes would be staked to a minimum width of 14 feet and as specified in the Plan of Development.
  • Flight Diverters: Shield wires, guy wires, and overhead optical ground wire along portions of the transmission line that have a high potential for avian collisions would be marked with flight diverters or other BLM-or U.S. Forest Service-approved devices in accordance with agency requirements. Portions of the transmission line that cross through, or are adjacent to, waterfowl and general migratory pathways or habitat for high priority avian species (i.e., sage-grouse) may be marked to reduce the risk of avian collisions. The specific segments to be marked would be determined in consultation with the appropriate agencies.
  • Limit Accessibility in Sensitive Habitats: Where feasible, access roads that traverse sensitive habitats (e.g., crucial winter range) would be gated or otherwise blocked to limit public access.