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Renewables and Efficiency in State Facilities & Operations (Hawaii)
DSIRE/DtAdd 2006-07-14  +
DSIRE/Id HI10R  +
DSIRE/LstUpdt May 28, 2013  +
Incentive/Active true  +
Incentive/ApplDsc Schools  + , State Government  +
Incentive/AuthCode HRS §196-9  +
Incentive/AuthDtEnact 2006-05-12  +
Incentive/AuthLink http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/hrscurrent/Vol03_Ch0121-0200D/HRS0196/HRS_0196-0009.htm  +
Incentive/ContAddr P.O. Box 2359  +
Incentive/ContAddr2 235 South Beretania Street, 5th Floor  +
Incentive/ContDept Hawaii Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism  +
Incentive/ContDiv Energy Efficiency Branch  +
Incentive/ContEmail cshon@dbedt.hawaii.gov  +
Incentive/ContName Carilyn Shon  +
Incentive/ContPhone (808) 587-3810  +
Incentive/ContPlace Honolulu, Hawaii  +
Incentive/ContWebsite http://www.hawaii.gov/dbedt/info/energy  +
Incentive/ContZip 96804-2359  +
Incentive/DsireSyncDate 2011-04-30 15:11:32  +
Incentive/EnergyCat Energy Efficiency Incentive Programs  + , Renewable Energy Incentive Programs  +
Incentive/ImplSector State/Territory  +
Incentive/Name Renewables and Efficiency in State Facilities and Operations  +
Incentive/Req State buildings, including new residential
State buildings, including new residential facilities receiving state funds, must meet minimum LEED or other approved construction and energy efficiency standard.<br /> Solar water heating systems must be installed in all state facilities, if life-cycle cost-benefit analysis determines it to be cost-effective.<br /> Agencies are required to purchase environmentally preferable, resource-efficient products and materials.
resource-efficient products and materials.  +
Incentive/Summary In May 2006, Hawaii’s governor signed HB 2
In May 2006, Hawaii’s governor signed HB 2175 addressing renewable energy, energy efficiency, and alternative fuels in state facilities and operations. This legislation also detailed requirements for renewable energy and energy efficiency in Hawaii’s public schools. State law requires energy efficiency and environmental standards for state facilities, motor vehicles, and transportation fuels. Each state agency must meet the following requirements to the extent possible: * Buildings must be designed and constructed to meet the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) “Silver” standard, the two green globes rating system, or another similar guideline, standard, or system that is approved by the state. * State buildings, including new residential facilities receiving state funds, must meet minimum insulation requirements, install high-performance windows, and, wherever possible, be oriented to maximize natural ventilation and day-lighting without heat gain and to optimize solar water heating. * With the exception of single-family residential clients of the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands or any agency which can take advantage of utility rebates, solar water heating systems must be installed in all state facilities, if life-cycle cost-benefit analyses determine it to be cost-effective. * State agencies must implement energy and water conservation practices in operations, and they are required to incorporate waste minimization and pollution prevention principles into standard operating practices. * Agencies should use life-cycle cost-benefit analysis to purchase energy efficient equipment, using utility rebate programs whenever possible to reduce costs. * Agencies are required to purchase environmentally preferable, resource-efficient products and materials. * Agencies must also track vehicle data such as fuel consumption, EPA fuel economy ratings, and acquisition cost, and use alternative fuels when available. Actions taken by state executive agencies to comply with Act 96 (codified as HRS §196-9) and Act 160, which directs the reporting of electricity consumption by state agencies, are reported annually to the State Legislature. Enacted in June 2009, [http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/session2009/bills/HB1464_CD1_.htm HB 1464] addressed energy efficiency requirements for existing public buildings. By the end of 2010, state agencies must evaluate the energy efficiency of all existing public buildings that are larger than 5,000 square feet or use more than 8,000 kilowatt-hours (kWh) annually. Opportunities for increased energy efficiency must be identified by setting benchmarks for these buildings using Energy Star Portfolio Management or another similar tool. Buildings must be retro-commissioned every five years.
st be retro-commissioned every five years.  +
Incentive/TechDsc Building Insulation + , Comprehensive Measures/Whole Building + , Biomass + , CHP/Cogeneration + , Daylighting + , Ground Source Heat Pumps + , Photovoltaics + , Small Hydroelectric + , Solar Water Heat + , Windows + , Wind +
Incentive/TechDscOther Bio-gas  +
Incentive/Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings +
OpenEI/PageDescription Renewables and Efficiency in State Facilities and Operations: energy incentive program.  +
OpenEI/PageKeyword Energy Incentives  + , Hawaii  + , Energy Standards for Public Buildings  +
Place Hawaii: Energy Resources +
Website http://energy.hawaii.gov/programs/achieving-efficiency/lead-by-example  +
Categories Incentive with Contacts , Incentive with Authorities , Rules Regulations Policies Incentive Programs
Modification date
"Modification date" is a predefined property that corresponds to the date of the last modification of a subject and is provided by Semantic MediaWiki.
15:51:27, 12 February 2015  +
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