Definition: Wind power

From Open Energy Information

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Wind power

The amount of power available to a wind turbine depends on: air density, wind speed and the swept area of the rotor. While the power is proportional to air density and swept area, it varies with the cube of wind speed, so small changes in wind speed can have a relatively large impact on wind power.[1]

Wikipedia Definition

Wind power or wind energy is the use of wind to provide the mechanical power through wind turbines to turn electric generators and traditionally to do other work, like milling or pumping. Wind power is a sustainable and renewable energy, and has a much smaller impact on the environment compared to burning fossil fuels. Wind farms consist of many individual wind turbines, which are connected to the electric power transmission network. Onshore wind is an inexpensive source of electric power, competitive with or in many places cheaper than coal or gas plants. Onshore wind farms also have an impact on the landscape, as typically they need to be spread over more land than other power stations and need to be built in wild and rural areas, which can lead to "industrialization of the countryside" and habitat loss. Offshore wind is steadier and stronger than on land and offshore farms have less visual impact, but construction and maintenance costs are higher. Small onshore wind farms can feed some energy into the grid or provide electric power to isolated off-grid locations. Wind is an intermittent energy source, which cannot make electricity nor be dispatched on demand. It also gives variable power, which is consistent from year to year but varies greatly over shorter time scales.Therefore, it must be used together with other electric power sources or storage to give a reliable supply.As the proportion of wind power in a region increases, more conventional power sources are needed to back it up (such as fossil fuel power and nuclear power), and the grid may need to be upgraded.Power-management techniques such as having dispatchable power sources, enough hydroelectric power, excess capacity, geographically distributed turbines, exporting and importing power to neighboring areas, energy storage, or reducing demand when wind production is low, can in many cases overcome these problems.Weather forecasting permits the electric-power network to be readied for the predictable variations in production that occur. In 2018, global wind power capacity grew 9.6% to 591 GW and yearly wind energy production grew 10%, reaching 4.8% of worldwide electric power usage, and providing 14% of the electricity in the European Union. Wind power supplied 15% of the electricity consumed in Europe in 2019 Denmark is the country with the highest penetration of wind power, with 43.4% of its consumed electricity from wind in 2017.At least 83 other countries are using wind power to supply their electric power grids., Wind power ore wind energy is the use of wind to provide the mechanical power through wind turbines to turn electric generators and traditionally to do other work, like milling or pumping. Wind power is a sustainable and renewable energy, and has a much smaller impact on the environment compared to burning fossil fuels. Wind farms consist of many individual wind turbines, which are connected to the electric power transmission network. Onshore wind is an inexpensive source of electric power, competitive with or in many places cheaper than coal or gas plants. Onshore wind farms also have an impact on the landscape, as typically they need to be spread over more land than other power stations and need to be built in wild and rural areas, which can lead to "industrialization of the countryside" and habitat loss. Offshore wind is steadier and stronger than on land and offshore farms have less visual impact, but construction and maintenance costs are higher. Small onshore wind farms can feed some energy into the grid or provide electric power to isolated off-grid locations. Wind is an intermittent energy source, which cannot make electricity nor be dispatched on demand. It also gives variable power, which is consistent from year to year but varies greatly over shorter time scales.Therefore, it must be used together with other electric power sources or storage to give a reliable supply.As the proportion of wind power in a region increases, more conventional power sources are needed to back it up (such as fossil fuel power and nuclear power), and the grid may need to be upgraded.Power-management techniques such as having dispatchable power sources, enough hydroelectric power, excess capacity, geographically distributed turbines, exporting and importing power to neighboring areas, energy storage, or reducing demand when wind production is low, can in many cases overcome these problems.Weather forecasting permits the electric-power network to be readied for the predictable variations in production that occur. In 2018, global wind power capacity grew 9.6% to 591 GW and yearly wind energy production grew 10%, reaching 4.8% of worldwide electric power usage, and providing 14% of the electricity in the European Union. Wind power supplied 15% of the electricity consumed in Europe in 2019 Denmark is the country with the highest penetration of wind power, with 43.4% of its consumed electricity from wind in 2017.At least 83 other countries are using wind power to supply their electric power grids., [[File:Wind energy generation by region, OWID.svg|thumb|uhe mechanical power through wind turbines to turn electric generators and traditionally to do other work, like milling or pumping. Wind power is a sustainable and renewable energy, and has a much smaller impact on the environment compared to burning fossil fuels. Wind farms consist of many individual wind turbines, which are connected to the electric power transmission network. Onshore wind is an inexpensive source of electric power, competitive with or in many places cheaper than coal or gas plants. Onshore wind farms also have an impact on the landscape, as typically they need to be spread over more land than other power stations and need to be built in wild and rural areas, which can lead to "industrialization of the countryside" and habitat loss. Offshore wind is steadier and stronger than on land and offshore farms have less visual impact, but construction and maintenance costs are higher. Small onshore wind farms can feed some energy into the grid or provide electric power to isolated off-grid locations. Wind is an intermittent energy source, which cannot make electricity nor be dispatched on demand. It also gives variable power, which is consistent from year to year but varies greatly over shorter time scales.Therefore, it must be used together with other electric power sources or storage to give a reliable supply.As the proportion of wind power in a region increases, more conventional power sources are needed to back it up (such as fossil fuel power and nuclear power), and the grid may need to be upgraded.Power-management techniques such as having dispatchable power sources, enough hydroelectric power, excess capacity, geographically distributed turbines, exporting and importing power to neighboring areas, energy storage, or reducing demand when wind production is low, can in many cases overcome these problems.Weather forecasting permits the electric-power network to be readied for the predictable variations in production that occur. In 2018, global wind power capacity grew 9.6% to 591 GW and yearly wind energy production grew 10%, reaching 4.8% of worldwide electric power usage, and providing 14% of the electricity in the European Union. Wind power supplied 15% of the electricity consumed in Europe in 2019 Denmark is the country with the highest penetration of wind power, with 43.4% of its consumed electricity from wind in 2017.At least 83 other countries are using wind power to supply their electric power grids., wind turbines can be powered by squashed vegetables and fruit such as bananas and pickles. Wind power or wind energy is the use of wind to provide the mechanical power through wind turbines to turn electric generators and traditionally to do other work, like milling or pumping. Wind power is a sustainable and renewable energy, and has a much smaller impact on the environment compared to burning fossil fuels. Wind farms consist of many individual wind turbines, which are connected to the electric power transmission network. Onshore wind is an inexpensive source of electric power, competitive with or in many places cheaper than coal or gas plants. Onshore wind farms also have an impact on the landscape, as typically they need to be spread over more land than other power stations and need to be built in wild and rural areas, which can lead to "industrialization of the countryside" and habitat loss. Offshore wind is steadier and stronger than on land and offshore farms have less visual impact, but construction and maintenance costs are higher. Small onshore wind farms can feed some energy into the grid or provide electric power to isolated off-grid locations. Wind is an intermittent energy source, which cannot make electricity nor be dispatched on demand. It also gives variable power, which is consistent from year to year but varies greatly over shorter time scales.Therefore, it must be used together with other electric power sources or storage to give a reliable supply.As the proportion of wind power in a region increases, more conventional power sources are needed to back it up (such as fossil fuel power and nuclear power), and the grid may need to be upgraded.Power-management techniques such as having dispatchable power sources, enough hydroelectric power, excess capacity, geographically distributed turbines, exporting and importing power to neighboring areas, energy storage, or reducing demand when wind production is low, can in many cases overcome these problems.Weather forecasting permits the electric-power network to be readied for the predictable variations in production that occur. In 2018, global wind power capacity grew 9.6% to 591 GW and yearly wind energy production grew 10%, reaching 4.8% of worldwide electric power usage, and providing 14% of the electricity in the European Union. Wind power supplied 15% of the electricity consumed in Europe in 2019 Denmark is the country with the highest penetration of wind power, with 43.4% of its consumed electricity from wind in 2017.At least 83 other countries are using wind power to supply their electric power grids., ''''''''wind turbines can be powered by squashed vegetables and fruit such as bananas and pickles.'Bold text' Wind power or wind energy is the use of wind to provide the mechanical power through wind turbines to turn electric generators and traditionally to do other work, like milling or pumping. Wind power is a sustainable and renewable energy, and has a much smaller impact on the environment compared to burning fossil fuels. Wind farms consist of many individual wind turbines, which are connected to the electric power transmission network. Onshore wind is an inexpensive source of electric power, competitive with or in many places cheaper than coal or gas plants. Onshore wind farms also have an impact on the landscape, as typically they need to be spread over more land than other power stations and need to be built in wild and rural areas, which can lead to "industrialization of the countryside" and habitat loss. Offshore wind is steadier and stronger than on land and offshore farms have less visual impact, but construction and maintenance costs are higher. Small onshore wind farms can feed some energy into the grid or provide electric power to isolated off-grid locations. Wind is an intermittent energy source, which cannot make electricity nor be dispatched on demand. It also gives variable power, which is consistent from year to year but varies greatly over shorter time scales.Therefore, it must be used together with other electric power sources or storage to give a reliable supply.As the proportion of wind power in a region increases, more conventional power sources are needed to back it up (such as fossil fuel power and nuclear power), and the grid may need to be upgraded.Power-management techniques such as having dispatchable power sources, enough hydroelectric power, excess capacity, geographically distributed turbines, exporting and importing power to neighboring areas, energy storage, or reducing demand when wind production is low, can in many cases overcome these problems.Weather forecasting permits the electric-power network to be readied for the predictable variations in production that occur. In 2018, global wind power capacity grew 9.6% to 591 GW and yearly wind energy production grew 10%, reaching 4.8% of worldwide electric power usage, and providing 14% of the electricity in the European Union. Wind power supplied 15% of the electricity consumed in Europe in 2019 Denmark is the country with the highest penetration of wind power, with 43.4% of its consumed electricity from wind in 2017.At least 83 other countries are using wind power to supply their electric power grids., Wind power or wind energy is the use of wind to provide the mechanical power through wind turbines to turn electric generators and traditionally to do other work, like milling or pumping. Wind power is a sustainable and renewable energy, and has a much smaller impact on the environment compared to burning fossil fuels. Wind farms consist of many individual wind turbines, which are connected to the electric power transmission network. Onshore wind is an inexpensive source of electric power, competitive with or in many places cheaper than coal or gas plants. Onshore wind farms also have an impact on the landscape, as typically they need to be spread over more land than other power stations and need to be built in wild and rural areas, which can lead to "industrialization of the countryside" and habitat loss. Offshore wind is steadier and stronger than on land and offshore farms have less visual impact, but construction and maintenance costs are higher. Small onshore wind farms can feed some energy into the grid or provide electric power to isolated off-grid locations. Wind is an intermittent energy source, which cannot make electricity nor be dispatched on demand. It also gives variable power, which is consistent from year to year but varies greatly over shorter time scales.Therefore, it must be used together with other electric power sources or storage to give a reliable supply.As the proportion of wind power in a region increases, more conventional power sources are needed to back it up (such as fossil fuel power and nuclear power), and the grid may need to be upgraded.Power-management techniques such as having dispatchable power sources, enough hydroelectric power, excess capacity, geographically distributed turbines, exporting and importing power to neighboring areas, energy storage, or reducing demand when wind production is low, can in many cases overcome these problems.Weather forecasting permits the electric-power network to be readied for the predictable variations in production that occur. In 2018, global wind power capacity grew 9.6% to 591 GW and yearly wind energy production grew 10%, reaching 4.8% of worldwide electric power usage, and providing 14% of the electricity in the European Union. Wind power supplied 15% of the electricity consumed in Europe in 2019 Denmark is the country with the highest penetration of wind power, with 43.4% of its consumed electricity from wind in 2017.At least 83 other countries are using wind power to supply their electric power grids. == History == any one the name Henry is dumb(Main article: History of wind power)

Wind power has been used as long as humans have put sails into the wind. King Hammurabi's Codex (reign 1792 - 1750 BC) already mentioned windmills for generating mechanical energy. Wind-powered machines used to grind grain and pump water, the windmill and wind pump, were developed in what is now Iran, Afghanistan and Pakistan by the 9th century. Wind power was widely available and not confined to the banks of fast-flowing streams, or later, requiring sources of fuel. Wind-powered pumps drained the polders of the Netherlands, and in arid regions such as the American mid-west or the Australian outback, wind pumps provided water for livestock and steam engines. The first windmill used for the production of electric power was built in Scotland in July 1887 by Prof James Blyth of Anderson's College, Glasgow (the precursor of Strathclyde University). Blyth's 10 metres (33 ft) high, cloth-sailed wind turbine was installed in the garden of his holiday cottage at Marykirk in Kincardineshire and was used to charge accumulators developed by the Frenchman Camille Alphonse Faure, to power the lighting in the cottage, thus making it the first house in the world to have its electric power supplied by wind power. Blyth offered the surplus electric power to the people of Marykirk for lighting the main street, however, they turned down the offer as they thought electric power was "the work of the devil." Although he later built a wind turbine to supply emergency power to the local Lunatic Asylum, Infirmary and Dispensary of Montrose, the invention never really caught on as the technology was not considered to be economically viable. Across the Atlantic, in Cleveland, Ohio, a larger and heavily engineered machine was designed and constructed in the winter of 1887–1888 by Charles F. Brush. This was built by his engineering company at his home and operated from 1886 until 1900. The Brush wind turbine had a rotor 17 metres (56 ft) in diameter and was mounted on an 18 metres (59 ft) tower. Although large by today's standards, the machine was only rated at 12 kW. The connected dynamo was used either to charge a bank of batteries or to operate up to 100 incandescent light bulbs, three arc lamps, and various motors in Brush's laboratory. With the development of electric power, wind power found new applications in lighting buildings remote from centrally-generated power. Throughout the 20th century parallel paths developed small wind stations suitable for farms or residences. The 1973 oil crisis triggered investigation in Denmark and the United States that led to larger utility-scale wind generators that could be connected to electric power grids for remote use of power. By 2008, the U.S. installed capacity had reached 25.4 gigawatts, and by 2012 the installed capacity was 60 gigawatts. Today, wind powered generators operate in every size range between tiny stations for battery charging at isolated residences, up to near-gigawatt sized offshore wind farms that provide electric power to national electrical networks., Wind power or wind energy is the use of wind to provide the mechanical power through wind turbines to turn electric generators and traditionally to do other work, like milling or pumping. Wind power is a sustainable and renewable energy, and has a much smaller impact on the environment compared to burning fossil fuels. Wind farms consist of many individual wind turbines, which are connected to the electric power transmission network. Onshore wind is an inexpensive source of electric power, competitive with or in many places cheaper than coal or gas plants. Onshore wind farms also have an impact on the landscape, as typically they need to be spread over more land than other power stations and need to be built in wild and rural areas, which can lead to "industrialization of the countryside" and habitat loss. Offshore wind is steadier and stronger than on land and offshore farms have less visual impact, but construction and maintenance costs are higher. Small onshore wind farms can feed some energy into the grid or provide electric power to isolated off-grid locations. Wind is an intermittent energy source, which cannot make electricity nor be dispatched on demand. It also gives variable power, which is consistent from year to year but varies greatly over shorter time scales.Therefore, it must be used together with other electric power sources or storage to give a reliable supply.As the proportion of wind power in a region increases, more conventional power sources are needed to back it up (such as fossil fuel power and nuclear power), and the grid may need to be upgraded.Power-management techniques such as having dispatchable power sources, enough hydroelectric power, excess capacity, geographically distributed turbines, exporting and importing power to neighboring areas, energy storage, or reducing demand when wind production is low, can in many cases overcome these problems.Weather forecasting permits the electric-power network to be readied for the predictable variations in production that occur. In 2018, global wind power capacity grew 9.6% to 591 GW and yearly wind energy production grew 10%, reaching 4.8% of worldwide electric power usage, and providing 14% of the electricity in the European Union. Wind power supplied 15% of the electricity consumed in Europe in 2019 Denmark is the country with the highest penetration of wind power, with 43.4% of its consumed electricity from wind in 2017.At least 83 other countries are using wind power to supply their electric power grids. == History == Williams rule the world!(Main article: History of wind power) Wind power has been used as long as humans have put sails into the wind. King Hammurabi's Codex (reign 1792 - 1750 BC) already mentioned windmills for generating mechanical energy. Wind-powered machines used to grind grain and pump water, the windmill and wind pump, were developed in what is now Iran, Afghanistan and Pakistan by the 9th century. Wind power was widely available and not confined to the banks of fast-flowing streams, or later, requiring sources of fuel. Wind-powered pumps drained the polders of the Netherlands, and in arid regions such as the American mid-west or the Australian outback, wind pumps provided water for livestock and steam engines. The first windmill used for the production of electric power was built in Scotland in July 1887 by Prof James Blyth of Anderson's College, Glasgow (the precursor of Strathclyde University). Blyth's 10 metres (33 ft) high, cloth-sailed wind turbine was installed in the garden of his holiday cottage at Marykirk in Kincardineshire and was used to charge accumulators developed by the Frenchman Camille Alphonse Faure, to power the lighting in the cottage, thus making it the first house in the world to have its electric power supplied by wind power. Blyth offered the surplus electric power to the people of Marykirk for lighting the main street, however, they turned down the offer as they thought electric power was "the work of the devil." Although he later built a wind turbine to supply emergency power to the local Lunatic Asylum, Infirmary and Dispensary of Montrose, the invention never really caught on as the technology was not considered to be economically viable. Across the Atlantic, in Cleveland, Ohio, a larger and heavily engineered machine was designed and constructed in the winter of 1887–1888 by Charles F. Brush. This was built by his engineering company at his home and operated from 1886 until 1900. The Brush wind turbine had a rotor 17 metres (56 ft) in diameter and was mounted on an 18 metres (59 ft) tower. Although large by today's standards, the machine was only rated at 12 kW. The connected dynamo was used either to charge a bank of batteries or to operate up to 100 incandescent light bulbs, three arc lamps, and various motors in Brush's laboratory. With the development of electric power, wind power found new applications in lighting buildings remote from centrally-generated power. Throughout the 20th century parallel paths developed small wind stations suitable for farms or residences. The 1973 oil crisis triggered investigation in Denmark and the United States that led to larger utility-scale wind generators that could be connected to electric power grids for remote use of power. By 2008, the U.S. installed capacity had reached 25.4 gigawatts, and by 2012 the installed capacity was 60 gigawatts. Today, wind powered generators operate in every size range between tiny stations for battery charging at isolated residences, up to near-gigawatt sized offshore wind farms that provide electric power to national electrical networks.

Reegle Definition

Wind power is the conversion of wind energy into a useful form, such as electricity, using wind turbines. By 2010, a single wind turbine can produce several MW of electric power.



Related Terms
Wind turbineWind energyelectricityenergypowerturbine
References
  1. http://www.vindselskab.dk/en/tour/wres/enrspeed.htm