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  • "Hazardous waste" means any solid waste or
    "Hazardous waste" means any solid waste or combination of solid wastes that because of their quantity, concentration or physical, chemical or infectious characteristics may:  cause or significantly contribute to an increase in mortality or an increase in serious irreversible or incapacitating reversible illness; or pose a substantial present or potential hazard to human health or the environment when improperly treated, stored, transported, disposed of or otherwise managed.  The law excludes drilling fluids, produced waters and other wastes associated with the exploration, development or production of crude oil or natural gas or geothermal energy from the definition of hazardous waste. Also excluded is solid waste from the extraction, beneficiation or processing of ores and minerals, including phosphate rock and overburden from the mining of uranium ore. Rules are stated for permits, storage tanks waste monitoring and testing and penalties.
    aste monitoring and testing and penalties.  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes https://openei.org/w/index.php?title=________________Appliance_Energy_Efficiency_Standards________(Maryland)&action=formeditfrom the Appliance Standards Awareness Project ([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. '' In 2004 the Energy Efficiency Standards Act (EESA of 2004) became law in the State of Maryland. The General Assembly passed the EESA to establish minimum energy efficiency standards on nine separate products. Five of the nine appliances covered by the EESA were preempted by the Federal Energy Policy Act of 2005 immediately or by the end of the year, and the remaining four were preemted in the following years. In 2007 the EESA of 2004 was amended to establish standards for seven additional types of appliances. Federal standards have since preempted the standards for all products except for the two listed below. Dates listed in parentheses signify the year when the standard took effect. * Bottle-type water dispensers (2009) * Commercial hot food holding cabinets (2009) Regulations implementing the initial set of standards under the EESA of 2004 were officially adopted by the Maryland Energy Administration (MEA) in June 2006. These new regulations incorporate the EESA amendments enacted June 2005 and address the preemption issues caused by the federal Energy Policy Act of 2005. The 2007 amendments required the Maryland Energy Administration to officially adopt regulations establishing the new standards by January 1, 2008. However, as of June 2010 this task had not been completed. The MEA may delay the effective date of any standard by up to one year if it determines that products conforming to the standard will not be widely available in Maryland by that date. Manufacturers must test products consistent with the testing standards established by the federal government in the Energy Policy Act of 2005. Manufacturers must certify to the MEA that the product is in compliance with the minimum efficiency standards. Certification, proof of testing, and labeling requirements are outlined in the EESA. Every two years the MEA is directed to consider and propose standards to the General Assembly for products not already subject to efficiency standards and revised, more stringent amendments to existing standards. ''* These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.''
    y Independence and Security Act of 2007.''  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes from the Appliance Standards Awareness Project ([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. See the Department of Energy [http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/appliance_standards/index.html Appliance Standards website for additional information on the federal standards.]'' In February 2006, Vermont established appliance efficiency legislation through bill H.0253, An Act Relating to Establishing Energy Efficiency Standards For Certain Appliances. This Act created minimum efficiency standards for certain products sold or installed in Vermont. Note, standards for medium voltage dry-type distribution transformers and metal halide lamp fixtures have been pre-empted by federal standards. The act states that the Vermont Department of Public Service must determine if standards for residential furnaces and boilers require a waiver from federal preemption and if so, must apply for a waiver. Vermont has not done so as of March 2012, and therefore, there are no active standards in VT. ''* These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.''
    y Independence and Security Act of 2007.''  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes from the Appliance Standards Awareness Project ([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. See the Department of Energy [http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/appliance_standards/index.html Appliance Standards] website for additional information.'' Massachusetts’ original appliance standards legislation was enacted in 1986. In November 2005, the standards were expanded, although to date most of the equipment listed in Massachusetts law has since been preempted by federal law. Because of the existing federal standards covering residential furnaces, boilers, and furnace fans, Massachusetts sought a waiver of federal preemption from the warm-state standard. That waiver would have allowed Massachusetts’ cold-state standard to go into effect in 2013. The Massachusetts Attorney General and the Department of Energy Resources (DOER) filed the [http://www.mass.gov/eea/pr-pre-p2/commonwealth-petitions-us-department-of-energy.html waiver petition in October 2009]. The U.S. Department of Energy responded negatively, see the [http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/appliance_standards/state_petitions.html Department of Energy web site] for more information on the petition, comments filed and denial. Therefore, there are no current appliance standards in place in MA. Testing procedures must be developed by the DOER if such procedures are not provided for in the state plumbing code. The DOER must use the U.S. Department of Energy approved test methods and manufacturers must certify that products are in compliance with the standards.The standards state that the DOER must file a biannual report on appliance efficiency standards with the Massachusetts House of Representatives including, but not limited to, an evaluation of the effectiveness of the standards on energy efficiency and energy conservation in Massachusetts. ''* These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.''
    y Independence and Security Act of 2007.''  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes from the Appliance Standards Awareness Project ([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. '' New Jersey Energy Efficiency Product Standards, enacted in 2005, include minimum standards for eight products, seven of which were immediately preempted by the federal Energy Policy Act of 2005. The efficiency standard for the one remaining product, unit heaters, was effective for a little over a year and then preempted by a federal standard in August of 2008. Future standards, if any, adopted by New Jersey will not apply to products manufactured in the State and sold outside the State, new products manufactured outside the State and sold at wholesale inside the State for final retail sale and installation outside the State, products installed in mobile manufactured homes at the time of construction, or products designed expressly for installation and use in recreational vehicles. The Board of Public Utilities (BPU) in consultation with the Commissioner of Environmental Protection, must adopt testing procedures if procedures are not provided for in the standard building code of New Jersey. The board shall use United States Department of Energy approved test methods, or other appropriate nationally-recognized test methods. Manufacturers certify to the board that products are in compliance with the standards. * ''These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. ''
    Independence and Security Act of 2007. ''  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes from the Appliance Standards Awareness Project ([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. '' California’s 2009 Appliance Efficiency Regulations (California Code of Regulations, Title 20, Sections 1601 through1608) were adopted by the California Energy Commission (CEC) on December 3, 2008, and approved by the California Office of Administrative Law on July 10, 2009, replacing all previous versions of the regulations. The Regulations create standards for twenty-three categories of appliances, including standards for both federally-regulated and non-federally-regulated appliances. Of these products, the standards now apply to the following types of new products sold, offered for sale in California, except those sold wholesale in California for final retail sale outside the state and those designed and sold exclusively for use in recreational vehicles or other mobile equipment: # Consumer audio and video products (2006/2007) # Pool pumps (2006/2008/2010) # General service incandescent light bulbs (2011) # Portable lighting fixtures (2010) # Water dispensers (2003) # Hot tubs (portable electric spas) (2009) # Commercial hot food holding cabinets (2006) # Under cabinet fluorescent lamps (2006) # Vending machines (2006) # Wine Chillers (2003) # Televisions (2011) # Small battery chargers that are consumer products (for cell phones, personal care devices, and power tools) (2/1/2013) # Large Industrial battery chargers and USB charger systems with a battery capacity of 20 Wh or more that are consumer products (1/1/2014) # Small battery chargers that are not consumer products (for items such as walkie talkies and portable barcode scanners) (1/1/2017) Dates listed above in parenthesis signify the standard’s effective date. Where more than one date is shown, the standard has more than one level or components which become effective on different dates. See regulations for specific types of appliances covered under these categories. Product-specific testing, certification, and labeling requirements are outlined in the regulations. The CEC is currently in the process of developing regulations for [http://www.energy.ca.gov/appliances/battery_chargers/ battery chargers]. California was the first state to initiate appliance efficiency standards in 1974 with the adoption of the Warren-Alquist Act, which instructed the CEC to promulgate efficiency standards. California has continued to upgrade its standards to remain consistent with new technologies. Most state standards programs have used California’s covered products, or a subset of these products, and its technical procedures as the basis for their efforts. California continues to lead the nation by being the first state to develop efficiency standards for certain [http://www.energy.ca.gov/appliances/2009_tvregs/index.html televisions]. ''* These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.''
    y Independence and Security Act of 2007.''  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes from the Appliance Standards Awareness Project ([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. '' Washington enacted appliance efficiency legislation in 2005, creating minimum efficiency standards for twelve products, all of which have been preempted by federal law. [http://apps.leg.wa.gov/documents/billdocs/2009-10/Pdf/Bills/House%20Passed%20Legislature/1004-S.PL.pdf HB 1004], signed in May 2009, added efficiency standards for several more products, which took effect January 1, 2010. These products include: # Wine chillers designed and sold for use by an individual # Hot water dispensers and mini-tank electric water heaters # Bottle-type water dispensers # Pool heaters, residential pool pumps, and portable electric spas # Commercial hot food holding cabinets Standards do not apply to new products manufactured in Washington and sold outside the State, new products manufactured outside Washington and sold at wholesale inside Washington for final retail sale and installation outside the State, products installed in mobile manufactured homes at the time of construction, or products designed expressly for installation and use in recreational vehicles. The law stipulates that existing standards and test methods may be increased and updated. Any recommendations shall be transmitted to the appropriate committees of the legislature sixty days before the start of any regular legislative session. ''* These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.''
    y Independence and Security Act of 2007.''  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes from the Appliance Standards Awareness Project ([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. '' Arizona’s Appliance and Equipment Efficiency Standards (Arizona Revised Statutes, Title 44, Section 1375) set minimum energy efficiency standards for twelve products, all of which have since been preempted by federal regulation. HB 2332 of 2009 established new standards, effective January 1, 2012 for three additional products: #Portable electric spas #Residential pool pumps #Residential pool pump motors. Specific testing requirements and minimum standards are outlined in the regulations. Manufacturers must certify to the Arizona Department of Commerce Energy Office that products meet minimum efficiency standards. Certification to other states with similar standards that publish databases of compliant products is permitted as an alternative to certifying to the Arizona Department of Commerce Energy Office. New products manufactured in Arizona and sold outside the State are not covered by the regulations. Additionally, the regulations do not apply to products installed in mobile manufactured homes at time of construction, products designed exclusively for installation and use in recreational vehicles, and products installed in a laundry facility located within an apartment complex or mobile home park. The standards stipulate that beginning on May 31, 2008, and every three years thereafter, the Arizona Department of Commerce Energy Office must conduct a comparative review and assessment of the standards and energy efficiency standards adopted in other states and submit a report of its findings and recommendations to the speaker of the house of representatives and president of the senate. ''* These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.''
    y Independence and Security Act of 2007.''  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes from the Appliance Standards Awareness Project ([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. '' Connecticut enacted efficiency standards through legislative actions in 2004 and 2007 and 2011. This law covers the following products that have not been pre-empted by federal standards: (Dates listed in parenthesis signify the year the standard took effect.) * Bottle-type water dispensers (2009) * Commercial hot food holding cabinets (2009) * Hot tubs (2009) * Swimming pool pumps (2010) * Compact Audio Equipment** * DVD Players and Recorders** * Televisions** The standards apply to products manufactured in Connecticut and sold inside the state. Manufacturers must certify to the Secretary of the Office of Policy Management that products comply with the regulations. The standards must be reviewed biennially and increased if it is determined that increased efficiency standards would serve to promote energy conservation and would be cost-effective for consumers. Standards for additional products may be adopted if it is determined that they would serve to promote energy conservation in the state, would be cost-effective for consumers, and that multiple products are available which meet such standards. ''* These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.'' ''**Adopted per legislation enacted July 2011 (SB 1243).''
    legislation enacted July 2011 (SB 1243).''  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes from the Appliance Standards Awareness Project([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. '' New York appliance efficiency standards legislation, enacted in 2005, covers the following products offered for sale in New York not preempted by federal standards as of August 2011: # Consumer audio and video products # Digital television adapters # Commercial hot food holding cabinets # Portable electric spas # Residential pool pumps # Bottle-type water dispensers # Portable light fixtures For consumer audio and video products and digital television adapters, the New York legislation requires the Department of State in consultation with New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) to develop standards by June 30, 2006 and to implement such standards no sooner than six months after issuing final rules. Temporary emergency rules were adopted and renewed several times during 2006 and 2007 but have since expired and not been renewed. The regulatory process for these equipment types appears to be ongoing as of August 2012. Efficiency requirements for the remaining products were adopted by legislation in 2010. The legislation required the Department of State in consultation with NYSERDA to develop regulations by December 31, 2010. As of August 2012, no such regulations have been adopted. New York law also allows the Secretary of State, in consultation with NYSERDA, to add additional products to the list. Any new products added to the list must be commercially available, cost effective on a life-cycle basis, and not covered under existing federal standards. ''* These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.''
    y Independence and Security Act of 2007.''  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes from the Appliance Standards Awareness Project ([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. '' In June 2005, Oregon passed legislation setting minimum energy efficiency standards for 11 appliances. Those products regulated by Oregon law and not currently covered by federal standards include: (Dates listed in parenthesis signify the effective year.) # Bottle-type water dispensers (2009) # Commercial hot food holding cabinets (2009) # Compact audio products (2009) # Digital versatile disc players and digital versatile disc recorders (2009) # Portable electric spas (2009) Testing requirements and minimum efficiency standards are outlined in the regulations. The standards do not apply to products installed in a mobile or manufactured home at the time of construction or designed expressly for installation and use in recreational vehicles. The law stipulates that the State Department of Energy must periodically review the minimum energy efficiency standards and report to the Legislative Assembly when the standards need to be updated, due to federal action or to the outcome of collaborative consultations with manufacturers and the energy departments of other states. ''* These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.''
    y Independence and Security Act of 2007.''  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes from the Appliance Standards Awareness Project ([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site and the U.S. Department of Energy's [http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/appliance_standards/index.html Appliance Standards] site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. '' Rhode Island’s Energy and Consumer Savings Act of 2005 established minimum energy efficiency standards for twelve commercial and residential products, nine of which were immediately preempted by federal law later that year, and another of which was preempted later. Thus far, Rhode Island has adopted and enforces standards for bottle-type water dispensers, mercury vapor lamp ballasts and commercial hot-food holding cabinets. Testing procedures for energy efficiency not provided for in Rhode Island law or in the State Building Code may be adopted from the test methods approved by the U.S. Department of Energy, or in the absence of such test methods, other appropriate nationally recognized test methods. The state may use updated test methods when new versions of test procedures become available. State law allows for the efficiency of existing standards to be increased. In considering amending the standards, the state must must determine that increased efficiency standards would serve to promote energy conservation in Rhode Island and would be cost-effective for consumers who purchase and use such products. ''* These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.''
    y Independence and Security Act of 2007.''  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes from the Appliance Standards Awareness Project ([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. '' In 2007 the District of Columbia (D.C.) enacted legislation, entitled the Energy Efficiency Standards Act of 2007, which created efficiency standards for six products, four of which were immediately preempted by federal law. The efficiency standards thereby apply to bottle-type water dispensers and commercial hot food holding cabinets sold in D.C. on or after January 1, 2009 and installed on or after January 1, 2010. The standards do not apply to new products manufactured in District of Columbia that are sold either outside of D.C. or sold wholesale within D.C. for final retail sale/installation outside of D.C. The standards do not apply to products installed in mobile homes at the time of construction or to products designed for installation and use within recreational vehicles. While these standards apply currently to two products, § 8-1771.04 establishes that the Mayor may adopt rules to either 1) increase efficiency standards for the listed products or 2) establish efficiency standards for products not listed if he/she feels it necessary to further promote energy conservation in D.C. The law further stipulates requirements for testing and certification. ''* These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.''
    y Independence and Security Act of 2007.''  +
  • ''' *Program discontinued''' The Tennesse
    ''' *Program discontinued''' The Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development offers low-interest loans of up to $300,000, with terms of up to 7 years, for energy efficiency projects and other projects shown to save energy or decrease energy demand. Businesses with fewer than 300 employees or less than $3.5 million in annual gross sales or receipts are eligible. The loan is offered with a 0% interest rate for businesses in the Three-Star communities, and at a 3% interest rate for all others. Loans cannot be used for new construction or business start-up. All renewable energy technologies are eligible under the program's guidelines. In addition to low-interest loans, the Energy Division offers free audits and technical assistance.
    fers free audits and technical assistance.  +
  • ''' Note: The Sustainable Energy Fund is n
    ''' Note: The Sustainable Energy Fund is not soliciting grant applications at this time. Please see information about the SEF's loan program.''' The Sustainable Energy Fund of Central Eastern Pennsylvania (SEF) disburses a limited number of grants and loans to organizations seeking funding for projects consistent with the Fund’s mission "to promote research and invest in clean and renewable energy technologies, energy conservation, energy efficiency and sustainable energy enterprises that provide opportunities and benefits for PP&L ratepayers." Research projects are not eligible for grant financing. The SEF was founded in November 1999 as a result of the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission electric utility restructuring proceedings. The SEF was a key component of the joint settlement with PP&L, Inc. (now PP&L Electric Utilities Corporation) and the PUC. The initial SEF funding of approximately $20.5 million will be generated over six years through a rate surcharge on PPL ratepayers. . See DSIRE's summary of Pennsylvania's Public Benefits Funds for more information.
    ublic Benefits Funds for more information.  +
  • ''' Note: The deadline for new application
    ''' Note: The deadline for new applications has now expired, but it is anticipated that the program will be renewed at some point in the future. ''' The Green Business Building Pilot Program will provide grants of up to $100,000 per facility for design assistance for private-sector construction projects that meet a minimum LEED level of gold and achieve energy performance of at least 20 percent above the minimum energy code, while achieving minimum standards for best practices in solid waste management. Eligible facilities must have a minimum of 50,000 square feet of conditioned space, and program participants must contribute a minimum of 10 percent of the total project costs associated with the fees for building design services. Hopeful participants must submit a notice of intent to apply no later than November 15, 2006, and must be able to verify that their project funding is in place and can establish an 18-month deadline by which final construction documents will be completed. Final applications for the grant are due January 2, 2007.
    ons for the grant are due January 2, 2007.  +
  • ''' Note: The program has been suspended a
    ''' Note: The program has been suspended and is undergoing redevelopment. Please check back for future updates. ''' Modeled after the successful Sustainable and Natural Alternative Power (SNAP) program in Chelan County, Washington, Rochester Public Utility's Solar Choice program encourages customers to install photovoltaic solar arrays and connect them to their utilities' electrical distribution system by offering an incentive payment based on the system's production on a $/kWh basis. The amount paid by each participating utility to its solar energy producers depends on the total amount contributed by that utility's purchasers through their solar green pricing program. The greater the amount contributed by purchasers, the greater the amount that will be distributed among participating producers, up to a maximum of $1.00 per kWh. This amount is considered payment for the green attributes of the electricity only, and is additional to retail rates the producer may receive for their electricity under the state's net metering laws. Producers are compensated for the total electricity produced, not the total exported to the grid. The maximum generation project that may be interconnected with the distribution system is 40 kilowatts. Solar Choice is not for customers who want to install renewable energy sources for back-up power generation at their home or business. This program began on October 1, 2005. Actual rates paid to producers will be posted annually.
    paid to producers will be posted annually.  +
  • ''' Note: This program is presently suspen
    ''' Note: This program is presently suspended pending a restructuring of the incentive. Owatonna hopes to reintroduce the program in 2008 as a per KW rebate designed to reduce the up front cost of installing a PV system. ''' Modeled after the successful Sustainable and Natural Alternative Power (SNAP) program in Chelan County, Washington, Owatonna Public Utility's Solar Choice program encourages customers to install photovoltaic solar arrays and connect them to their utilities' electrical distribution system by offering an incentive payment based on the system's production on a $/kWh basis. The amount paid by each participating utility to its solar energy producers depends on the total amount contributed by that utility's purchasers through their solar green pricing program. The greater the amount contributed by purchasers, the greater the amount that will be distributed among participating producers, up to a maximum of $1.00 per kWh. This amount is considered payment for the green attributes of the electricity only, and is additional to retail rates the producer may receive for their electricity under the state's net metering laws. Producers are compensated for the total electricity produced, not the total exported to the grid. The maximum generation project that may be interconnected with the distribution system is 40 kilowatts. Solar Choice is not for customers who want to install renewable energy sources for back-up power generation at their home or business. This program began on October 1, 2005. Actual rates paid to producers will be posted annually.
    paid to producers will be posted annually.  +
  • ''' Note: program removed, included in Eff
    ''' Note: program removed, included in Efficiency United''' Through Efficiency United, Michigan Gas Utilities offers several incentive options to eligible commercial and industrial customers. The programs incent customers to save energy and money through the use of energy efficient technologies. The Prescriptive Gas Measures for Business Customers Program offers various rebates and incentives to commercial and industrial gas customers in the Michigan Gas Utilities service area. Equipment and measures are meant to increase the efficiency and the cost effectiveness of running a customer's business. All equipment must be new and replacing an older system or model. Eligible equipment and measures include steam trap tests and replacements, boilers, boiler tune-ups and controls, pipe wrap, furnaces, infrared heaters, programmable thermostats, occupancy sensors, water heaters, clothes washers and pool heaters. Itemized invoices of equipment costs and installation labor must be included along with new equipment specification sheet. Please wait to receive approval before starting work. Projects must be implemented by December 31, 2010. View program web site listed above to see guidelines and application form. The Commercial and Industrial (C&I) Custom Program provides custom incentives to C&I customers for the installation of energy-efficient equipment and controls. The custom program allows measures and systems to be installed for situations unique to that customer's application or process. MGU will pay up to 40% of a projects cost up to $10,000. Applicants must receive approval prior to beginning project. Rebates will not be provided for project with a payback less than 2 years or greater than 7 years. Complete form and attach invoice of all project costs. Applicants have 120 days to implement project after approval is granted. An application can be found on the program web site listed above. Through the Residential and Small Business Energy Star Program, rebates are also available for water heaters, pipe wrap, faucet aerators and clothes washers. See program [http://www.efficiencyunited.com/resources/Energy_Star_Incentive_Request_Form_MGU.pdf application] for more details on equipment and eligibility.
    more details on equipment and eligibility.  +
  • ''''' Deadline for submissions was July 30
    ''''' Deadline for submissions was July 30, 2010. Applications received after this date will not be considered.''''' The Wisconsin Department of Commerce is offering low-interest loans to for-profit manufacturing companies for projects that support renewable energy and energy efficiency jobs within the state. The program is only available for businesses locating or expanding within the state of Wisconsin. Loans will be issued for up to 25% of project cost at a fixed interest rate of 2% over terms of 5-7 years (working capital) or 5-10 years (equipment). Loan repayment may be deferred for up to one year. The program is intended for businesses that promote: * major renewable energy production projects; * the manufacture of clean energy products; * advanced manufacturing of clean energy components; * retooling to provide component parts and other critical needs for a successful, totally integrated supply chain; * improving industrial users’ competitiveness through energy efficiency and renewable energy deployment. The definitions of eligible renewable energy and energy efficiency related technologies are not specified, but the program website gives several examples possible projects. Project eligibility is limited to those that create or retain jobs through clean energy advanced manufacturing, clean energy supply chain development, and through reduction in the use of fossil fuels at industrial facilities, including the integration of renewable energy into industrial processes. Funds specifically may not be used for construction or building repairs; to purchase buildings or land; or to perform research, development, and demonstration activities for non-commercial technologies. Projects that have already obtained other necessary financing pieces; environmental and zoning permits; and other clearances will be given a high priority under this program. Money to fund this program comes from State Energy Program funds under the federal American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009, otherwise known as the federal stimulus bill. Currently, $28 million in funding is available through this program with up to $5 million set aside for applications in state's cheese industry. The program is eventually expected to have a total budget of $55 million. Please consult the program website for further details or contact the appropriate [http://commerce.wi.gov/BD/BD-AreaDevManagers.html Commerce Area Development Manager] to discuss your project.
    elopment Manager] to discuss your project.  +
  • ''''' Due to the current budgetary constra
    ''''' Due to the current budgetary constraints of the District of Columbia government, program funding has been rescinded for fiscal year 2011. August 15, 2010 was the final day which programs were operational. This does not affect Pepco customers in Maryland. '''''<br> PEPCO offers appliance and lighting rebates to its residential DC customers who purchase select energy efficient products. Rebates are available on CFL light bulbs, refrigerators, room a/c units, and water heaters. Refrigerators and a/c units must be Energy Star qualified and water heaters must have an Efficiency Factor of at least 0.93 to receive rebate. Rebates are available to Pepco DC customers on qualifying purchases at any retail store after September 15, 2009. Rebate applications must include account number, original sales receipt, and must be received within 60 days of purchase. See the program website listed above to view the [http://www.pepco.com/_res/documents/MD%20Rebate%20Application%209_23_09%20FINAL.pdf Appliance Rebate Application] or a list of [http://homeenergysavings.pepco.com/dc/lighting/stores participating CFL retailers.]
    hting/stores participating CFL retailers.]  +
  • ''''' Note: Due to possible funding constr
    ''''' Note: Due to possible funding constraints, all rebate applications must be pre-approved before purchasing any equipment.''''' Groton Utilities, a municipal utility, offers incentives for commercial and industrial customers to install energy-efficient equipment in eligible facilities through several efficiency programs described in detail on the web site above. Rebates for: *efficient lighting retrofits and vending machine controls (based on number of kilowatt-hours (kWh) saved) *new energy-efficient lighting *high-efficiency motors (based on the number, type, and efficiency rating of units installed) *HVAC equipment (based on the system size and efficiency) In some cases the rebate is limited to 50% of the total project cost. Applications are available on the utility's web site, and in some cases an application must be submitted for approval before construction begins. Groton Utilities may perform a post-installation inspection at the utility's discretion. Groton Utilities also offers cash incentives for customers who participate in the utility's [http://www.grotonutilities.com/conserv.asp?l=1 Demand Response Program]. This voluntary program requires customers to reduce electricity consumption when the electric system is severely constrained and the price of electricity is high.
    ined and the price of electricity is high.  +
  • ''''' Note: Rates listed below are for far
    ''''' Note: Rates listed below are for farmers who signed up for the program by January 1, 2011. Information regarding future funding opportunities will be posted here when it becomes available. ''''' The Missouri Agricultural and Small Business Development Authority (MASBDA) is now offering incentives to livestock farmers in the form of assistance with loans for energy efficiency. The "Missouri Agricultural Energy Saving Team - a Revolutionary Opportunity," or MAESTRO, offers assistance in the form of Interest Buy Downs, Cash Down Payments, a Loan Loss Reserve, and Audit Rebates. <b>Implementation Grant</b>: MASBDA will provide up to $12,000 of cost-share, not to exceed 75% of the total retrofit project. A farmer can use up to $3,000 of that amount for home upgrades. Installed retrofits must result in at least 15% energy savings. <b>Interest Buy Down</b>: MASBDA will pay for a portion of the interest due on loans for energy efficiency technologies. The loan interest rate will be reduced to 3%. The lender receives the difference in interest payments in one lump sum. For example, if the loan was $25,000 at a 6.5% interest rate for 5 years, with monthly payments, the interest would have been $4,349.26. The same loan at 3% interest would be $1,953.02 in interest. Therefore, the lender would receive a payment of $2,386.24 ($4,349.26-$1,953.02). <b>Cash Down Payment</b>: Farmers can also choose a Cash Down Payment. The payment is calculated as above, but instead of the lender receiving the payment, the farmer receives the payment. If the farmer chooses this option, the loan interest rate remains the same instead of decreasing to 3%. <b>Loan Loss Reserve</b>: MASBDA has established a dedicated fund for the purpose of guaranteeing payments on defaulted loans. When farmers apply for a loan from a lender, the farmer and lender submit an application to the MASBDA for the Loan Loss Reserve. If approved, the program guarantees to the lender that if the farmer defaults on the loan, MASBDA will pay up to 75% of the loan. <b>Audit Rebates</b>: MASBDA is offering rebates of up to $125 for a farm audit and $125 for a home audit. Farmers can only qualify for the rebate if one or more of the audit recommendations are implemented and the energy savings realized are at least 15%. To begin the application process for one of the above options, interested livestock farmers must first sign up for a comprehensive farm audit. The audit will identify efficiency technologies that should be installed at the farm or farm house. Only these technologies are eligible for the Interest Buy Down, Cash Down Payment, or Loan Loss Reserve programs. To participate in the program, interested farmers should contact EnSave at 1-800-732-1399 to set up an initial assessment. In order to qualify for the MAESTRO program, applicants must be legal Missouri residents that operate animal agricultural farmers. Loans must be from a state or national bank, farm credit system, bank for cooperatives, federal or state chartered savings and loan association, federal or state building and loan association or a small business investment company. All energy efficiency technology must be installed and operational by November 30, 2012. <i>This program is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) [http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/betterbuildings/neighborhoods/ BetterBuildings Program]. The DOE has awarded over $500 million in federal funds to more than 40 states, local governments, and organizations to administer local programs targeting a variety of building types. Combined, these local programs are expected to improve the efficiency of more than 170,000 buildings through 2013 and save up to $65 million in energy costs annually.</i>
    illion in energy costs annually.</i>  +
  • ''''' Note: THIS PROGRAM HAS EXPIRED FOR 2
    ''''' Note: THIS PROGRAM HAS EXPIRED FOR 2008 AND NOT YET REOPENED FOR 2009''''' This program is offered to Data Centers in the Oncor service area to encourage energy efficiency upgrades. It provides incentive dollars for installing energy efficient measures in data center facilities, including virtualization solutions and high efficiency UPS and HVAC system upgrades (and others - see program materials). Demand reduction measures are eligible for an incentive of $150/kW and energy usage reductions may receive an incentive of $0.0175/kWh. There are no project size limits specified for this program. This program also provides funds to offset the cost of completing assessments needed to establish which projects may provide the largest energy savings potential. Assessment assistance levels depend on project size and completion date. The details are listed in the program incentive schedule above. Projects must be completed by November 30, 2008 in order to be eligible for any of the incentives listed above. CLEAResult Consulting is the implementing contractor for Oncor Electric Delivery's Data Center Energy Management Program in Texas.
    Center Energy Management Program in Texas.  +
  • ''''''''Note: The SunSense Program will re
    ''''''''Note: The SunSense Program will resume for 2015 and begin accepting applications on January 14, 2015 at 1:30 PM. '''On November 25th. 2014 the Florida PSC voted to end a solar pilot program at the end of 2015 that requires independently owned utilities to offer solar rebates. This program will not be offered after 2015.''''''''''' Progress Energy Florida (PEF) has allocated $1.9 million per year towards residential photovoltaic (PV) incentives. PEF will accept applications annually from residential customers both wishing to install a PV system and qualifying for a rebate. Reservations for a rebate will be issued on a first-come basis, however a reservation does not guarantee that a rebate will be awarded, only that funding for a rebate is available should the system be installed, meet all requirements and pass inspection. To qualify for the residential PV program, an applicant must be a Progress Energy Florida (PEF) customer and a homeowner. The applicant must also be the account holder, use the home as a primary residence and own the solar PV system  installed on the home. Other requirements include: * PEF must approve application and conduct an on-site Home Energy Check (HEC) prior to PV system installation * The proposed PV system must be certified and approved by the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) * Systems must be installed by a licensed contractor, meet electric and safety standards * Participating customers’ systems must be directly connected to the PEF system by following the [https://www.progress-energy.com/company/electricity-system/interconnect/florida/index.page? DEF interconnection procedures]. Customers with PV systems ranging in size from 2 kW DC to 10 kW DC are eligible to participate and may earn an incentive based on the kW value. Installations of systems system larger than 10 kW are permissible, but the incentive is limited to a maximum of $20,000 per residence. After installation, the PV system must be capable of producing at least 1,000 kWh per kW DC each year. Once the limit of $1.9 million in rebates is achieved, the application process will be closed. The process will be re-opened again October 1 of each year for systems to be installed the following calendar year. For an application checklist, further requirements and additional resources regarding the rebate please visit the[https://www.progress-energy.com/florida/home/save-energy-money/energy-efficiency-improvements/sunsense/solar-pv.page? DEF Solar PV website].
    ense/solar-pv.page? DEF Solar PV website].  +
  • '''''*This program has been deactivated an
    '''''*This program has been deactivated and is now part of the Efficiency United entry''''' Alpena Power Company offers rebates, assistance and other incentives through the Efficiency United program, which is a partnership between 11 Michigan utilities. The program is intended to provide assistance and incentives to customers who install or employ energy efficient equipment or measures which save money and energy at home and at work. The Energy Star Appliance Rebate Program is one part of this program. Alpena offers the Residential HVAC Program, which provides incentives to residential customers for installing energy efficient central air conditioning units and ECM blower motors. Incentives will be provided to the home owner and will be based on fulfilling energy efficiency standards. See Efficiency United web site listed above for further information regarding program guidelines and incentives.
    garding program guidelines and incentives.  +
  • '''''*This program has been deactivated an
    '''''*This program has been deactivated and is now part of the Efficiency United entry''''' The Commercial and Industrial Rebate Program offers several options to business customers in the Alpena service area. The programs incent customers to save energy and money through the use of energy efficient technologies. The Prescriptive Commercial and Industrial Program offers incentives for various efficient hvac measures, motors, fans, pumps, drives, water heaters, refrigeration measures, cooking equipment, lighting fixtures, systems and controls. Applications must have complete information and be submitted with an invoice itemizing the new equipment purchased and the manufacturer specification sheets. Invoice must indicate date of purchase, size, type, make, model and project cost. To qualify lighting must be used a minimum of 1,800 hours per year. Purchased and installed equipment must not receive an incentive larger than $10,000. Customers must receive written approval before installation. The Commercial and Industrial (C&I) Custom Program provides custom incentives to C&I customers for the installation of energy-efficient equipment and controls. The custom program allows measures and systems to be installed for situations unique to that customer's application or process. Incentives are offered on a per kW and kWh schedule, based on projected savings. Applicants must receive approval prior to beginning project. Complete form and attach invoice of all project costs. Contact Alpena Power Company for more information or an application. Small businesses are also available for the Residential and Small Business Energy Star Program. This program provides rebates for the purchase of efficient CFL bulbs ($1) and energy star clothes washers ($50). Replacement washers must be CEE Tier 2 or 3 to qualify. View web site listed above for more program information.
    listed above for more program information.  +
  • '''''*This record is for information purpo
    '''''*This record is for information purposes only.* TSI will no longer accept applications for Solar Installation Grants. The program received more applications than ARRA allocations could support. TSI will re-open the program should additional funds become available.''''' The Tennessee Solar Institute is a collaboration between the University of Tennessee and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, established in 2009. Using funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), the Solar Institute began offering grants* for solar installations in June 2010. Only business entities (including commercial, industrial and agricultural businesses) and non-profit organizations (with 501c3 designation) are eligible to apply. Systems owned by third parties are eligible for funding. Pre-approval is required for all projects. All projects must be built by December 31, 2011, and must follow ARRA reporting requirements in order to receiving funding. Awards totaling half of the $9 million allocated for this initiative have been announced as of August 2010. A full technical review along with the detailed application is required to receive the solar installation incentive. *'' These grants are available on a first-come, first-served basis as long as the project complies with the program guidelines and meets all eligibility requirements and funding is available. In a typical "grant" program, there is some sort of competition and/or ranking of qualified applicants. This program resembles a rebate program rather than a grant program.''
    ate program rather than a grant program.''  +
  • '''''2013 Update: Phase II of the Qualifyi
    '''''2013 Update: Phase II of the Qualifying Advanced Energy Project is open. Required concept papers are due to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by April 9, 2013. The U.S. DOE will review concept papers and select which companies will be allowed to submit a full application. Applications are due July 23, 2013. Concept papers and applications must follow guidelines and are to be submitted electronically via the EERE eXCHANGE web site (see web link above).'''''<br> <br> ''The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009'' established an investment tax credit to encourage the development of a U.S.-based renewable energy manufacturing sector. The investment tax credit is equal to 30% of the qualified investment required for an advanced energy project that establishes, re-equips or expands a manufacturing facility that produces any of the following: * Equipment and/or technologies used to produced energy from the sun, wind, geothermal or "other" renewable resources * Fuel cells, microturbines or energy-storage systems for use with electric or hybrid-electric motor vehicles * Equipment used to refine or blend renewable fuels * Equipment and/or technologies to produce energy-conservation technologies (including energy-conserving lighting technologies and smart grid technologies)* Qualified investments generally include personal tangible property that is depreciable and required for the production process. Other tangible property may be considered a qualified investment only if it is an essential part of the facility, excluding buildings and structural components.<br> <br> Based on recommendations from the U.S. DOE, the U.S. Treasury Department (Treasury) will issue certifications for qualified investments eligible for credits to qualifying advanced energy project sponsors. After certification is granted, the taxpayer has one year to provide additional evidence that the requirements of the certification have been met and three years to put the project in service. There are provisions for credit recapture for non-compliance. There is a total of $150 million available for this phase of the Advanced Energy Manufacturing Tax Credit program.<br> <br> In determining which projects to certify, the U.S. DOE and Treasury must consider those which most likely will be commercially viable, provide the greatest domestic job creation, provide the greatest net reduction of air pollution and/or greenhouse gases, have great potential for technological innovation and commercial deployment, have the lowest levelized cost of generated (or stored) energy ''or'' the lowest levelized cost of reduction in energy consumption or greenhouse gas emissions, ''and'' have the shortest project time.<br> <br> Any taxpayer receiving this credit may '''not '''also receive the federal [http://www.dsireusa.org/library/includes/incentive2.cfm?Incentive_Code=US02F&State=federal¤tpageid=1&ee=1&re=1 business energy investment tax credit]. <br> ''* This credit could be expanded in the future to include other energy technologies that reduce greenhouse gas emissions, as determined by the U.S. Treasury Department.''
    ermined by the U.S. Treasury Department.''  +
  • '''''A Delaware SREC Pilot Procurement Pro
    '''''A Delaware SREC Pilot Procurement Program was approved in November of 2011 by the Delaware Public Service Commission. The program is expected to begin in April 2012, the details of the pilot program can be found [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=DE24F&re=1&ee=1 here].''''' In 2005, Senate Bill 74 established a [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=DE06R&re=1&ee=1 renewables portfolio standard (RPS)] requiring Delaware retail electricity suppliers to purchase 10% of the electricity sold in the state from renewable sources by 2019. [http://legis.delaware.gov/LIS/LIS144.NSF/vwLegislation/SB+19?Opendocument Senate Bill 19 of 2007] increased the RPS target to 20%, and added a requirement that a portion of the requirement be met with solar photovoltaic (PV) resources. The standard was expanded again to 25% renewables and 3.5% photovoltaics by 2026 by [http://delcode.delaware.gov/sessionlaws/ga145/chp451.shtml S.S. 1 for S.B. 119] enacted in July 2010. The PV target began at 0.011% for the June 2008 - May 2009 compliance year (CY 2009) and accelerates slowly over time towards an ultimate target of 3.5% for compliance year 2025-2026. The RPS applies to the state's investor-owned utilities, retail electricity suppliers, municipal utilities, and rural electric cooperatives. Municipal utilities and rural electric cooperatives are allowed to opt out of the RPS requirements if they establish a comparable RPS program for their own ratepayers by 2013, and establish a green energy fund. Under Delaware law, a solar renewable energy credit (SREC), is equivalent to one megawatt-hour (MWh) of retail electricity sales in the state that is derived from a qualifying PV resource. Electricity suppliers must purchase SRECs in order to meet their compliance obligations under the law, or pay a Solar Alternative Compliance Payment (SACP) for any shortfalls in SREC purchases. The SACP operates as a ceiling on the price that a supplier would pay for SRECs used for compliance with the Delaware RPS. In general, the SACP is initially set at $400 per MWh, but increases to $450 per MWh if the electricity supplier has opted for the ACP in any previous year, and then increases to $500 with any subsequent uses. The Delaware Energy Office has the authority to review and adjust the ACP and SACP given certain market conditions. As of August 2012, sales of Delaware-sourced SRECs tracked on the [http://www.pjm-eis.com/ PJM-EIS Generation Attributes Tracking System (GATS)] averaged $189 per MWh, down from $260 MWh average for June 2010-August 2011. Under this system SRECs represent a potentially significant source of revenue for owners of qualifying PV facilities with a value determined by demand in the trading market. In Delaware, net metering customers retain ownership of SRECs (or RECs) for energy produced and consumed by the customer. A generator remains eligible to generate SRECs for as long as the facility remains certified as an eligible generator. SRECs submitted for compliance with the RPS must have been created no more than three years prior to the year in which they are used for compliance. In other words, an SREC may generally be used for compliance by an obligated electricity supplier for the compliance year during which it was generated or the two subsequent compliance years.* An obligated entity may use an SREC to comply with the PV carve-out of the RPS or with the general renewables requirement. For the purposes of compliance, an SREC generated by a customer-sited facility physically located within Delaware and installed on or before December 31, 2014 is granted a 300% multiplier if used to fulfill the general renewables requirement. Thus, one SREC equals one SREC for the PV carve-out, but three RECs used to fulfill the general renewables requirement.** In order to begin producing Delaware-eligible SRECs, generators must be certified by the Delaware Public Service Commission (PSC) as an eligible generator. In order to qualify as an eligible generator, customer-sited facilities (i.e., behind the meter facilities) must be physically located within the state of Delaware. Generation from other facilities qualifies for Delaware's standard if the generator is located within the PJM footprint, or if the electricity is imported into the PJM and tracked through the PJM Market Settlement System. When the generator has been issued a certification number, they may create an account with the PJM-EIS Generation Attribute Tracking System (GATS). The GATS is used to track the generation and transfer of SRECs from an eligible facility. SRECs are created in the GATS based on energy production meter readings uploaded to the system by the generator. Unlike some other states, Delaware does not allow small generators to use engineering estimates of energy production as the basis for creating SRECs. The passage of [http://www.legis.delaware.gov/LIS/lis146.nsf/vwLegislation/SB+124/$file/legis.html?open S. B. 124] in July of 2011 amended the Delaware RPS to allow energy output from a Qualified Fuel Cell Provider Project in fulfilling a portion of the requirements under the RPS Act. A qualified fuel cell provider project is a fuel cell power generation project located in Delaware owned and/or operated by a Qualified Fuel Cell Provider. A qualified provider is defined in S.B. 124 as a commercial operation which manufactures fuel cells capable of being run on renewable fuels and is designated as an economic development opportunity by the Delaware Economic Development Office and the DNREC. The energy produced by such projects shall fulfill the commission-regulated electric company's state-mandated REC and SREC requirements. The fulfillment of the equivalent of 1 REC is equal to each MWh of energy. These projects will fulfill no more than 30% of the SREC requirements at a ratio of 6 MWh of RECs per 1MWh of SRECs. ''* The Delaware Sustainable Energy Utility (SEU) is required to act as a REC aggregator for customer-sited renewable energy facilities. The three-year REC lifetime is "tolled", or suspended, during any period in which a REC is held by the SEU. ** Delaware also has allows a small credit bonus of 10% for solar electricity produced by solar (or wind) installations for which at least 50% of the equipment (on the basis of cost) is manufactured in Delaware, or for which 75% of the labor and construction is performed by an in-state workforce.''
    n is performed by an in-state workforce.''  +
  • '''''A Delaware SREC Pilot Procurement Pro
    '''''A Delaware SREC Pilot Procurement Program was approved in November of 2011 by the Delaware Public Service Commission. The details of the pilot program can be found''''' '''''[http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=DE24F&re=1&ee=1 here].''''' In 2005, Senate Bill 74 established a [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=DE06R&re=1&ee=1 renewables portfolio standard (RPS)] requiring Delaware retail electricity suppliers to purchase 10% of the electricity sold in the state from renewable sources by 2019. [http://legis.delaware.gov/LIS/LIS144.NSF/vwLegislation/SB+19?Opendocument Senate Bill 19 of 2007] increased the RPS target to 20%, and added a requirement that a portion of the requirement be met with solar photovoltaic (PV) resources. The standard was expanded again to 25% renewables and 3.5% photovoltaics by 2026 by [http://delcode.delaware.gov/sessionlaws/ga145/chp451.shtml S.S. 1 for S.B. 119] enacted in July 2010. The PV target began at 0.011% for the June 2008 - May 2009 compliance year (CY 2009) and accelerates slowly over time towards an ultimate target of 3.5% for compliance year 2025-2026. The RPS applies to the state's investor-owned utilities, retail electricity suppliers, municipal utilities, and rural electric cooperatives. Municipal utilities and rural electric cooperatives are allowed to opt out of the RPS requirements if they establish a comparable RPS program for their own ratepayers by 2013, and establish a green energy fund.<br> <br> Under Delaware law, a solar renewable energy credit (SREC), is equivalent to one megawatt-hour (MWh) of retail electricity sales in the state that is derived from a qualifying PV resource. Electricity suppliers must purchase SRECs in order to meet their compliance obligations under the law, or pay a Solar Alternative Compliance Payment (SACP) for any shortfalls in SREC purchases. The SACP operates as a ceiling on the price that a supplier would pay for SRECs used for compliance with the Delaware RPS. In general, the SACP is initially set at $400 per MWh, but increases to $450 per MWh if the electricity supplier has opted for the ACP in any previous year, and then increases to $500 for subsequent years. The Delaware Energy Office has the authority to review and adjust the ACP and SACP given certain market conditions. As of October 2014, sales of Delaware-sourced SRECs tracked on the [http://www.srectrade.com/ SRECTrade] averaged $55 per MWh. <br> <br> Under this system SRECs represent a potentially significant source of revenue for owners of qualifying PV facilities with a value determined by demand in the trading market. In Delaware, net metering customers retain ownership of SRECs (or RECs) for energy produced and consumed by the customer. A generator remains eligible to generate SRECs for as long as the facility remains certified as an eligible generator. SRECs submitted for compliance with the RPS must have been created no more than three years prior to the year in which they are used for compliance. In other words, an SREC may generally be used for compliance by an obligated electricity supplier for the compliance year during which it was generated or the two subsequent compliance years.* An obligated entity may use an SREC to comply with the PV carve-out of the RPS or with the general renewables requirement. For the purposes of compliance, an SREC generated by a customer-sited facility physically located within Delaware and installed on or before December 31, 2014 is granted a 300% multiplier if used to fulfill the general renewables requirement. Thus, one SREC equals one SREC for the PV carve-out, but three RECs used to fulfill the general renewables requirement.*<br> <br> In order to begin producing Delaware-eligible SRECs, generators must be certified by the Delaware Public Service Commission (PSC) as an eligible generator. In order to qualify as an eligible generator, customer-sited facilities (i.e., behind the meter facilities) must be physically located within the state of Delaware. Generation from other facilities qualifies for Delaware's standard if the generator is located within the PJM footprint, or if the electricity is imported into the PJM and tracked through the PJM Market Settlement System. When the generator has been issued a certification number, they may create an account with the PJM-EIS Generation Attribute Tracking System (GATS). The GATS is used to track the generation and transfer of SRECs from an eligible facility. SRECs are created in the GATS based on energy production meter readings uploaded to the system by the generator. Unlike some other states, Delaware does not allow small generators to use engineering estimates of energy production as the basis for creating SRECs. <br> The passage of [http://www.legis.delaware.gov/LIS/lis146.nsf/vwLegislation/SB+124/$file/legis.html?open S. B. 124 ]in July of 2011 amended the Delaware RPS to allow energy output from a Qualified Fuel Cell Provider Project in fulfilling a portion of the requirements under the RPS Act. A qualified fuel cell provider project is a fuel cell power generation project located in Delaware owned and/or operated by a Qualified Fuel Cell Provider. A qualified provider is defined in S.B. 124 as a commercial operation which manufactures fuel cells capable of being run on renewable fuels and is designated as an economic development opportunity by the Delaware Economic Development Office and the DNREC. The energy produced by such projects shall fulfill the commission-regulated electric company's state-mandated REC and SREC requirements. The fulfillment of the equivalent of 1 REC is equal to each MWh of energy. These projects will fulfill no more than 30% of the SREC requirements at a ratio of 6 MWh of RECs per 1MWh of SRECs.<br> <br> ''* The Delaware Sustainable Energy Utility (SEU) is required to act as a REC aggregator for customer-sited renewable energy facilities. The three-year REC lifetime is "tolled", or suspended, during any period in which a REC is held by the SEU.<br> <br> ** Delaware also has allows a small credit bonus of 10% for solar electricity produced by solar (or wind) installations for which at least 50% of the equipment (on the basis of cost) is manufactured in Delaware, or for which 75% of the labor and construction is performed by an in-state workforce.''
    n is performed by an in-state workforce.''  +
  • '''''Applications are now being considered
    '''''Applications are now being considered on a case-by-case basis. School districts interested in applying for loans should contact Ron Graham, Executive Director of the Energy Efficient Schools Initiative, directly.''''' The Energy Efficient Schools Initiative (EESI) was created in May 2008 to provide [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=TN56F&re=1&ee=1 grants] and loans to Tennessee school systems for capital outlay projects that meet energy efficient design and technology guidelines for school facilities. All school systems in Tennessee are eligible to apply. Possible projects include lighting upgrades, HVAC upgrades, and other projects that meet pre-determined energy use objectives. The maximum loan is $66/student (at the district level). School districts that already executed loans totaling less than $1 million cannot refinance existing loans, but they can apply for an additional loan as long as the combined total does not exceed $1 million. In addition, the Technical Advisory Committee will review $30 million worth of loans, which have a $5 million cap per school district. The committee will submit its choices to the EESI Council. State government appropriated the original funding ($90 million) with a onetime transfer from the Lottery for Education Account reserve and Lottery for Education special reserve account for K-12 capital outlay. Additional money to the fund comes from interest earnings and other funds secured by the Energy Efficient Schools Council. The Council is part of the Department of Education.
    il is part of the Department of Education.  +
  • '''''Applications for grants under the 201
    '''''Applications for grants under the 2011 solicitation were due by 2:00 PM on April 4, 2011.''''' The North Carolina Green Business Fund, created in 2007, provides funding to North Carolina small and mid-size businesses, nonprofit organizations, state agencies and local governments to encourage the development and commercialization of "promising" renewable energy and green building technologies. Grants of up to $500,000 are available for the development of commercial innovations and applications in the biofuels industry, sustainable building practices and private sector investment in renewable energy technologies. North Carolina-based businesses and nonprofits with fewer than 100 employees, as well as state and local governmental entities, are generally eligible. Grants in the green building sector may be awarded for innovation in areas of installation, certification or distribution of green building materials; energy audits; workforce development; and marketing and sales. For private sector investment in clean technologies, grants may target renewable energy deployment, biomass energy projects, waste reclamation for energy, implementation of energy efficiency technologies and clean distributed generation infrastructure improvements. Grants are also available for the development, production and distribution of biofuels in North Carolina. The 2011 solicitation had a total of $3 million. This solicitation is now closed.
    million. This solicitation is now closed.  +
  • '''''As of 12/7/2010, funding for this pro
    '''''As of 12/7/2010, funding for this program is fully reserved. Applications received after this date will be placed on a waiting list in case additional funding becomes available.''''' The Minnesota Small Wind Turbine Rebate program provides financial support to commercial businesses that install Small Wind Turbine systems. Here, Small Wind Turbine systems are those with rated capacities at or less than thirty five kilowatts (35 kW) at 24.6 miles per hour (mph). Eligibility is determined by nature and size of the business, site designated for installation and equipment selected. The rebate amount is 35% of eligible system and installation costs, up to $ 25,000. Rebates will be awarded on a first-come, first-served basis until all available funds have been reserved. A rebate application must be approved by the Minnesota Office of Energy Security before any equipment is ordered, purchased, or installed. A Rebate Confirmation Form and Rebate Claim Form will be mailed to the applicant upon application approval. Visit the [http://www.state.mn.us/portal/mn/jsp/content.do?id=-536893811&subchannel=null&sc2=null&sc3=null&contentid=536920558&contenttype=EDITORIAL&programid=536917401&agency=Energy Minnesota Small Wind Commercial Rebate webpage] to obtain more further information on rebate application steps '''Participant Eligibility''' Small businesses with 20 or fewer full-time employees are eligible. A facility owned by a non-profit organized under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code is eligible provided that the facility is used for a commercial activity. '''Commercial Site Requirements''' The location for installation must be within the state borders of Minnesota. In addition, the site must register a minimum of 12 mph at wind system hub height. See the [http://www.state.mn.us/portal/mn/jsp/content.do?id=-536893809&subchannel=-536895045&sc2=null&sc3=null&contentid=536919721&contenttype=EDITORIAL&programid=536917287&agency=Energy Minnesota OES Wind Speed Verification Tool] in order to determine your location’s average annual wind speed: Wind Speed Verification Tool '''Qualifying Installation and Technology''' The wind system must have a minimum average wind speed of 12.0 mph at hub height. Eligible wind system models are listed on the MN OES Commercial Small Wind Rebate website. The small wind system must be installed by a bonded and/or licensed contractor, as applicable to state and local ruling. The installation must be finished within 180 days of rebate application approval.
    n 180 days of rebate application approval.  +
  • '''''As of 12/7/2010, funding for this pro
    '''''As of 12/7/2010, funding for this program is fully reserved. Applications received after 12/7/2010 will be placed on a waiting list in case funding becomes available.''''' The Minnesota Office of Energy Security (OES) is offering rebates to offset the up-front cost of installing small wind energy generation devices at existing primary residences in Minnesota. Systems are limited to a maximum rated capacity of 35 kilowatts (kW) at a wind speed of 24.6 mph. Qualifying systems are eligible for a rebate of 35% of installed system costs up to a maximum rebate of $10,000 and incentive amounts may not exceed the total cost of the system minus the cost of any federal, utility, or other incentives. Although the program opened in May 2010, systems installed on or after July 1, 2009 that meet the program requirements are eligible for incentives. For systems beginning construction after April 30, 2010, participants must submit an application to reserve funding prior to installing the system. The system must be installed within 180 days of receiving a reservation confirmation in order to qualify for a rebate. Both grid-connected and off-grid systems are eligible for incentives. However, system eligibility is limited to a list of specific wind turbine models contained in the program application and a variety of additional equipment, installation, and warranty requirements apply to systems and major components. Notably, applicants must demonstrate that the site wind resource is sufficient for wind generation (minimum 12 mph at hub height) and tower heights must be at least 80 feet unless the applicant can demonstrate that the minimum wind speed is available at a lower height. This requirement can be met using the Minnesota Wind Verification Tool on the program web site, or through a site assessment report from a Midwest Renewable Energy Association (MREA) certified site assessor. The OES also suggests that prospective participants explore options for improving the energy efficiency of their home prior to installing a wind energy system. A total of $500,000 is available under this program, funded from State Energy Program (SEP) funds under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Applications will be accepted on a first-come, first-served basis until available funding is exhausted. Please see the program web site and rebate application for additional details.
    rebate application for additional details.  +
  • '''''As of March 24, 2010, the reservation
    '''''As of March 24, 2010, the reservation period for the second round of funding is closed. Additional rounds of funding are not anticipated.''''' The Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals, and Energy (DMME) is utilizing up to $15 million over three years to provide rebates on solar thermal heating, solar photovoltaic (PV) installations (up to 10 kW for residential), and for small wind systems (up to 10 kW for residential). The funding was made available from the State Energy Program allocation from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The two-step application includes a rebate reservation request. This request is made via the online submission portal found at the DMME's website. Rebate recipients are subject to audits and certification. Applicants will be required to submit documentation of work in addition to the completed reservation form and rebate application. In general, all applicants are required to comply with local, state and federal building, fire and safety codes and are responsible for obtaining building permits (as required) or other permits/documentation that may be required (in the case of historical structures). Interested applicants must read through the [http://www.dmme.virginia.gov/DE/ARRA-Public/RenewableEnergyRebateTerms.pdf Terms and Conditions] carefully, as there are many additional requirements and stipulations to consider. ''*CEC-AC is a system's capacity rating based on PVUSA Test Conditions (PTC) and inverter efficiency.''
    onditions (PTC) and inverter efficiency.''  +
  • '''''As of March 24, 2010, the reservation
    '''''As of March 24, 2010, the reservation period for the second round of funding is closed. Additional rounds of funding are not anticipated.''''' The Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals, and Energy (DMME) is utilizing up to $15 million over three years to provide rebates on solar thermal heating, solar photovoltaic (PV) installations and small wind systems. The funding was made available from the State Energy Program allocation from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The two-step application includes a rebate reservation request. This request is made via the online submission portal found at the DMME's website. Rebate recipients are subject to audits and certification. Applicants will be required to submit documentation of work in addition to the completed reservation form and rebate application. In general, all applicants are required to comply with local, state and federal building, fire and safety codes and are responsible for obtaining building permits (as required) or other permits/documentation that may be required (in the case of historical structures or in the case that their project will be subject to review under the National Environmental Policy Act). Interested applicants must read through the [http://www.dmme.virginia.gov/DE/ARRA-Public/RenewableEnergyRebateTerms.pdf Terms and Conditions] carefully, as there are many additional requirements and stipulations to consider. ''*CEC-AC is a system's capacity rating based on PVUSA Test Conditions (PTC) and inverter efficiency.''
    onditions (PTC) and inverter efficiency.''  +
  • '''''As of March 26, 2010, the Virginia De
    '''''As of March 26, 2010, the Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals, and Energy is no longer accepting reservations. This program is fully subscribed and the information here is for informational purposes only.''''' The Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals, and Energy (DMME) are providing rebates for a variety of energy efficiency upgrades. In all cases, the energy efficient equipment must replace older, less efficient, in-use equipment. The second round of funding has up to $6.5 million for rebates for residents that invest in energy efficiency improvements, retrofits, or replacement of old inefficient equipment with approved energy efficient equipment in their homes.* For a list of energy efficiency technologies and services eligible for rebates, review DMME's [http://www.dmme.virginia.gov/DE/ARRA-Public/EEMeasuresRequirements.shtml list]. The application is a two-step process. Residents MUST first submit a reservation application to be eligible for a rebate. Equipment purchased on or after June 26, 2009 is eligible. In most cases, applicants will be required to submit a Manufacturer's Certification Statement and in some cases, the contractor will be required to calculate estimated or expected energy savings of the efficiency upgrades. Applicants should read DMME's [http://www.dmme.virginia.gov/DE/ARRA-Public/EEGenTermsConditions.shtml Terms and Conditions] carefully as well as see the Frequently Asked Questions, which provide additional guidance. *''This $6.5 million is the total available to fund both residential and commercial rebates.''
    both residential and commercial rebates.''  +
  • '''''As of March 26, 2010, the Virginia De
    '''''As of March 26, 2010, the Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals, and Energy is no longer accepting reservations. This program is fully subscribed and the information here is for informational purposes only.''''' The Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals, and Energy (DMME) are providing rebates for a variety of energy efficiency upgrades. In all cases, the energy efficient equipment must replace older, less efficient, in-use equipment. The second round of funding has up to $6.5 million for rebates for commercial, agricultural, and "light industrial" businesses that invest in energy efficiency improvements, retrofits, or replacement of old inefficient equipment with approved energy efficient equipment in their businesses. For a list of energy efficiency technologies and services eligible for rebates, review DMME's [http://www.dmme.virginia.gov/DE/ARRA-Public/EEMeasuresRequirements.shtml list]. The application is a two-step process. Businesses MUST first submit a reservation application to be eligible for a rebate. Equipment purchased on or after June 26, 2009 is eligible. In most cases, applicants will be required to submit a Manufacturer's Certification Statement and in some cases, the contractor will be required to calculate estimated or expected energy savings of the efficiency upgrades. Applicants should read DMME's [http://www.dmme.virginia.gov/DE/ARRA-Public/EEGenTermsConditions.shtml Terms and Conditions] carefully as well as see the Frequently Asked Questions, which provide additional guidance.
    stions, which provide additional guidance.  +
  • '''''As of October 23, 2008, this program
    '''''As of October 23, 2008, this program is suspended until further notice. More details will be provided on the program website as they become available.''''' Arizona Public Service (APS), an investor-owned utility, has partnered with the Electric and Gas Industries Association (EGIA) and participating contractors to help facilitate unsecured financing through the GEOSmart® Sustainable Financing Solutions program. Under this program, APS customers may receive a loan of up to $50,000, with interest rates as low as 7.99%, for a solar-energy system. The loan may be combined with the APS [http://www.dsireusa.org/library/includes/incentive2.cfm?Incentive_Code=AZ04F&state=AZ&CurrentPageID=1&RE=1&EE=1 Renewable Incentive Program]. Customers can choose from three basic financing plans; more details are available on the program web site. At this time, loans may be used to install photovoltaic (PV) systems and solar water heaters. Eventually, APS plans to provide financing for solar space heating and small wind systems as well. Note that other financing or lease options may also be available from installers or other financial institutions.
    nstallers or other financial institutions.  +
  • '''''As part of Ohio’s Tax Reform personal
    '''''As part of Ohio’s Tax Reform personal property tax will be phased-out by 2009 and corporate franchise tax will be phased-out by 2010 for most taxpayers.''''' Ohio may provide an exemption for certain property from real and personal property taxation,* state sales and use taxes, and the state's corporate franchise tax where applicable. The exemption applies to property used in energy conversion, thermal-efficiency improvements and the conversion of solid waste to energy. Generally, "energy conversion" refers to the replacement of fossil-fuel resources with alternative fuels or technologies; "thermal efficiency improvements" refers to the recovery of waste heat or steam produced in any commercial or industrial processes; and "solid waste conversion" refers to the use of waste to produce energy and the utilization of such energy. Eligible technologies may include solar-thermal systems, photovoltaic systems, wind, biomass, landfill gas and waste-recovery systems. Upon receipt of certification from the tax commissioner, such property is exempt from Ohio's sales and use tax. In addition, such property is not considered to be an improvement on the land for purposes of real property taxation or as 'used in business' for purposes of personal property taxation.* Such property is also not considered in the assessment of Ohio's corporate franchise tax. These provisions have been in effect since 1978. Contact the Department of Taxation for more information. The Application for Energy and Solid Waste Energy Conversion and Thermal Efficiency Improvement Facility is found at on the Ohio Department of Taxation [http://dw.ohio.gov/tax/dynamicforms/searchresults.asp website] (form number ECF). *''It should be noted that Ohio's personal property taxes for general business filers have been phased out. See the Department of Taxation [http://tax.ohio.gov/divisions/communications/publications/annual_reports/2008_Annual_Report/property_tax_tangible_personal_property.pdf.pdf fact sheet] on this subject. It should be noted that public utilities are not considered "general business filers" and personal property of public utilities is still taxed. Furthermore, for tax purposes, a business that produces electricity and sells excess electricity to others will be subject to personal property taxes as well. See the Department of Taxation's [http://tax.ohio.gov/divisions/communications/publications/annual_reports/2008_Annual_Report/property_tax_public_utility_property.pdf.pdf fact sheet] for more information. ''
    f.pdf fact sheet] for more information. ''  +
  • '''''As part of Ohio’s Tax Reform, persona
    '''''As part of Ohio’s Tax Reform, personal property tax was phased-out by 2009 and corporate franchise tax was phased-out by 2010 for most taxpayers.''''' Ohio may provide an exemption for certain property from real and personal property taxation*, state sales and use taxes, and the state's corporate franchise tax where applicable. The exemption applies to property used in energy conversion, thermal-efficiency improvements and the conversion of solid waste to energy. Generally, "energy conversion" refers to the replacement of fossil-fuel resources with alternative fuels or technologies; "thermal efficiency improvements" refers to the recovery of waste heat or steam produced in any commercial or industrial processes; and "solid waste conversion" refers to the use of waste to produce energy and the utilization of such energy. Eligible technologies ''may'' include solar-thermal systems, photovoltaic systems, wind, biomass, landfill gas and waste-recovery systems. Upon receipt of certification from the tax commissioner, such property is exempt from Ohio's sales and use tax. In addition, such property is not considered to be an improvement on the land for purposes of real property taxation or as 'used in business' for purposes of personal property taxation.* Such property is also not considered in the assessment of Ohio's corporate franchise tax. These provisions have been in effect since 1978. Contact the Department of Taxation for more information. The Application for Energy and Solid Waste Energy Conversion and Thermal Efficiency Improvement Facility is found at on the Ohio Department of Taxation [http://dw.ohio.gov/tax/dynamicforms/searchresults.asp website] (form number ECF). *''It should be noted that Ohio's personal property taxes for general business filers have been phased out. See the Department of Taxation [http://tax.ohio.gov/divisions/communications/publications/annual_reports/2008_Annual_Report/property_tax_tangible_personal_property.pdf.pdf fact sheet] on this subject. It should be noted that public utilities are not considered "general business filers" and tangible personal property of public utilities is still taxed. Furthermore, for tax purposes, a business that produces electricity and sells excess electricity to others will be subject to personal property taxes as well. See the Department of Taxation's [http://tax.ohio.gov/divisions/communications/publications/annual_reports/2008_Annual_Report/property_tax_public_utility_property.pdf.pdf fact sheet] for more information.''
    df.pdf fact sheet] for more information.''  +
  • '''''Burbank Water and Power (BWP) '''''''
    '''''Burbank Water and Power (BWP) ''''''''''accepted applications for photovoltaic (PV) rebates throughout July 2013. Winners were determined through a lottery on August 12, 2013. ''''''''''Only systems under 30 kW were accepted for this round. ''''''''''See web site above for more information. ''''' Burbank Water and Power (BWP) offers customers either an up-front capacity-based rebate for photovoltaic (PV) systems, or a production-based incentive (PBI) with a maximum payment of $400,000 per year. These incentives decline over time as defined capacity goals are met, eventually declining to zero by the end of 2016. The program may change at any time to address market conditions. Current incentive levels and program details are posted on BWP's [http://www.burbankwaterandpower.com/index.php/incentives-for-all-customers/solar-photovoltaic-power solar web site].<br> <br> The highest rebate, Tier 3, is for schools, non-profits, and affordable housing and is available for only one project per fiscal year. Otherwise, these projects will qualify for the commercial rebate structure. Owners of systems smaller than 30 kW CEC-AC in capacity have the option to receive a one-time up-front payment (EPBB) based on the expected performance determined by BWP's PowerClerk rebate application software. Otherwise, these customers may elect to receive the PBI for five years of monthly payments, based on production. PV systems over 30 kW CEC-AC in size are only eligible to receive the PBI. Incentives for systems over 30 kW, however, have been suspended through August 2013.<br> <br> Beginning January 1, 2010, all PV systems must include a BWP-provided performance meter. PBI customers must pay for the meter and any other meter-related equipment. Also beginning January 1, 2010, customers may use approved leasing as a financing option. In addition, leases less than 20 years are subject to a pro-rated rebate.<br> <br> All customers applying for a BWP solar incentive are required to first conduct an energy-efficiency audit of the building where the solar system would be installed. Newly constructed residential and commercial buildings must achieve at least a 15% reduction in the building’s combined space heating, space cooling and water heating energy compared to Title 24 standards. Lighting is also included in this comparison for commercial buildings. Additionally, each appliance and any equipment provided by the builder must meet Energy Star criteria if this designation is applicable for that appliance or equipment. There is a limit of one solar rebate per customer for the life of the program. Click [http://www.burbankwaterandpower.com/incentives-for-residents/residential-rebates-home-rewards here ]to read about BWP's rebates for residential solar water heaters.
    bates for residential solar water heaters.  +
  • '''''City of North Port loan funds have be
    '''''City of North Port loan funds have been fully committed and are no longer available to residents. Residents of Unincorporated Sarasota County will be put on a waiting list and will be notified when their application will be accepted.''''' Sarasota County offers the Get Energy Smart Retrofit Loan Program to residents of Sarasota County and the City of North Port. In order to qualify for a loan, the total household income of the residents of the home must be less than 140% of median income for Sarasota County. [http://www.ohcd.sarasotagov.com/Get%20Energy%20Smart/Get%20Energy%20Smart%20Income%20Guidelines.pdf Income guidelines] are based on the number of people in the home. A full list of eligibility requirements can be found in the [http://www.ohcd.sarasotagov.com/Get%20Energy%20Smart/guidelines.pdf program guidelines]. Funds can be used for lighting retrofits, Energy Star appliances, insulation, duct repair and sealing, high efficiency air conditioners and heat pumps, solar attic fans, and solar water heaters, and any other items recommended by a home energy auditor. Interested, qualified residents should [http://www.ohcd.sarasotagov.com/Get%20Energy%20Smart/Energy%20Program%20Loan%20Application.pdf apply online]. Once approved, the applicant must obtain three informal bids or estimates from [http://www.scgov.net/retrofit/ParticipatingContractors.asp Participating Contractors], select an auditor, and have an audit performed. Qualified applicants can receive up to a $500 rebate to help with the cost of the audit. Funds are distributed on a first-come, first-served basis.
    buted on a first-come, first-served basis.  +
  • '''''Contact Peoples Gas for information o
    '''''Contact Peoples Gas for information on limited-time bonus incentive offerings. Bonus incentives of $250 - $450 are available for eligible purchases made before May 31, 2013.''''' The Peoples Gas Natural Gas Savings Program offers incentives to encourage customers to make energy-efficient improvements to their homes and apartment buildings. Rebates are available on energy efficient furnaces, boilers, water heaters, controls and insulation. To qualify, gas furnaces, boilers, and water heaters must be installed by professional contractors. Property owners of multifamily units may also participate in this program. A full list of eligible models and insulation and instructions on how to apply for the rebates can be found on the Natural Gas Savings Program web site. Applications must be made no later than 60 days after the equipment purchase date. The Natural Gas Savings Program is funded by customers of Peoples Gas, through a line item on the bill called the Enhanced Efficiency Program. The Program is guided by Peoples Gas, the Citizen's Utility Board, the City of Chicago Department of Environment, the Environmental Law and Policy Center, and the Illinois Attorney General's Office.
    nd the Illinois Attorney General's Office.  +
  • '''''DMME is currently developing criteria
    '''''DMME is currently developing criteria, guidelines, and requirements for loan interest to be charged thereon, the collateralization of loaned<br> funds, the payment of fees and costs incurred by DMME in the making of loans, and such other matters as DMME deems appropriate to ensure the sound conduct of a revolving loan program'''''. The Voluntary Solar Resource Development Fund is a revolving loan fund administered by the Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals and Energy (DMME). The Fund will be fueled primarily by donations from customers of investor-owned electric utilities, other citizens and groups. DMME is will begin issuing loans after July 1, 2012. Eligible projects include the acquisition, installation, and operation of eligible solar equipment at residences, structures operated by nonprofit organizations, or commercial establishments. The Code of Virginia defines the eligible devices as follows: "Photovoltaic device" means a device made in the United States that uses a solar photovoltaic process to generate electricity. "Solar space heating device" means a device made in the United States that, when installed in connection with a structure, uses solar energy for the purpose of heating the interior of the structure, which device moves the sun's heat from one or more collectors to interior areas through the use of a pump and piping or fans and ductwork, and a heat exchanger. "Solar space heating device" does not include a passive solar device. "Solar water heating device" means a device made in the United States that, when installed in connection with a structure, uses solar energy for the purpose of providing hot water for use within the structure.
    ng hot water for use within the structure.  +
  • '''''Due to fund depletion, the program cl
    '''''Due to fund depletion, the program closed to new applications on Friday, April 13, 2012. Purchases made after Thursday, April 12, 2012 will not qualify for a rebate.''''' '''''Note: Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is providing a total of $300 million to U.S. states, U.S. territories and the District of Columbia to establish rebate programs for new energy-efficient appliances that replace existing appliances in homes. Each state and territory has designed its own program. Rebates will be available until the state or territory program's funding is exhausted. Be sure to confirm that rebate funds are still available in your state or territory before making purchasing decisions.''''' Beginning on March 15, 2010, Arkansas's Residential Energy-Efficient Appliance Rebate Program is offering rebates for select Energy Star appliances installed in households in Arkansas. This program is administered by the Arkansas Energy Office. These rebates are available for Energy Star refrigerators, clothes washers, gas condensing water heaters, gas storage water heaters, gas tankless water heaters, and electric heat pump water heaters. These appliances must replace an existing appliance. After purchasing the eligible Energy Star appliances, individuals must apply for the rebate within 30 days. Equipment purchased online is not eligible to receive rebates. Information on the availability of funds can be obtained at the [http://recovery.arkansas.gov/ Arkansas Recovery web site] by calling 1-800-558-2633.
    overy web site] by calling 1-800-558-2633.  +
  • '''''Due to new federal banking and financ
    '''''Due to new federal banking and finance regulations, Coast Electric Power Association can not currently originate loans through this program. A new loan origination format will be available in the near future. Check the program web site above for program status.''''' Coast Electric Power Association (CEPA) offers an Energy Efficiency Finance Program for their residential customers. Mobile homes are not eligible for this loan. The loan can be from $1,000 to $15,000 with a fixed interest rate of two points above the prime rate, with a maximum payback period of 120 months. Loans are available for conservation measures in already existing structures, new construction does not apply. The Loan can cover the installed cost of a complete air-source or geothermal heat pump system, including wiring, duct work, and other associated costs. Certain weatherization measures are also eligible, such as electric water heaters, storm windows and doors, structural insulation, caulking and weather-stripping, and generators. Customers should contact a CEPA Marketing Representative to find out which measures are applicable for their home. For more information, customers can refer to the [http://www.coastepa.com/documents/CAFinanceFactSheet.pdf Comfort Advantage Finance Fact Sheet].
    pdf Comfort Advantage Finance Fact Sheet].  +
  • '''''Federal guidelines have prompted Boul
    '''''Federal guidelines have prompted Boulder County to examine their residential program to ensure it adheres to the new requirements. The ClimateSmart Loan program is on hold for residential loans while County officials review the guidelines. The program is also on hold for commercial projects.''''' Voters in Boulder approved [http://www.bouldercounty.org/newsroom/articlefiles/1304-2008-99%20Resolution%20for%201A%20-%20Clean%20Energy%20Options.pdf Ballot Issue 1A] in November 2008, authorizing Boulder County to issue bonds for the purpose of providing special financing options for renewable energy and energy efficiency improvements to homes in the county. All of the local governments in Boulder County have authorized the city to provide loans to home owners which will then be repaid through a special assessment on their property tax bills. Tax payers can pay two equal half payments due on the last day of February and on June 15th, or the whole payment on April 30th. Either the amount due for the year or the entire loan amount can be paid at these times. After a successful first round of residential funding, Boulder is making plans for the second round of residential funding, and applications are expected to be available in mid-April 2010. Additionally, Boulder launched its first round of commercial funding in January 2010. Property owners can apply for funding for a maximum of 20% of the statutory actual value of the property on which the equipment will be installed, or $50,000 for residential systems and $210,000 for commercial systems, whichever is less. $15,000 is available for income qualified loans, which can be supplemented with open category loans, subject to the $50,000 maximum. The loan can be used to finance a wide variety of efficiency and renewable energy projects on homes in Boulder County. Residential applicants must pay a $75 non-refundable application fee, and obtain written estimates or bids with a "not to exceed" clause prior to applying. Income qualifying loans, for those making up to 115% of area median income, are restricted to primary residences and will receive lower interest rates and annual assessments.
    wer interest rates and annual assessments.  +
  • '''''Fort Pierce Utilities Authority has s
    '''''Fort Pierce Utilities Authority has suspended the Solar Water Heating rebate program until 2013. Contact the utility for more information on these offerings.''''' Fort Pierce Utilities Authority is offering a Solar Water Heating rebate program. Flat rebates of $450 are now available to residential customers toward the installation of new solar water heating units. Systems must be certified by the Florida Solar Energy Center and installed by a licensed Florida contractor to qualify. Rebates are limited to one per household. Rebate applications can be found [http://www.fpua.com/customer_service/index.php here].
    fpua.com/customer_service/index.php here].  +