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  • "Hazardous waste" means any solid waste or
    "Hazardous waste" means any solid waste or combination of solid wastes that because of their quantity, concentration or physical, chemical or infectious characteristics may:  cause or significantly contribute to an increase in mortality or an increase in serious irreversible or incapacitating reversible illness; or pose a substantial present or potential hazard to human health or the environment when improperly treated, stored, transported, disposed of or otherwise managed.  The law excludes drilling fluids, produced waters and other wastes associated with the exploration, development or production of crude oil or natural gas or geothermal energy from the definition of hazardous waste. Also excluded is solid waste from the extraction, beneficiation or processing of ores and minerals, including phosphate rock and overburden from the mining of uranium ore. Rules are stated for permits, storage tanks waste monitoring and testing and penalties.
    aste monitoring and testing and penalties.  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes https://openei.org/w/index.php?title=________________Appliance_Energy_Efficiency_Standards________(Maryland)&action=formeditfrom the Appliance Standards Awareness Project ([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. '' In 2004 the Energy Efficiency Standards Act (EESA of 2004) became law in the State of Maryland. The General Assembly passed the EESA to establish minimum energy efficiency standards on nine separate products. Five of the nine appliances covered by the EESA were preempted by the Federal Energy Policy Act of 2005 immediately or by the end of the year, and the remaining four were preemted in the following years. In 2007 the EESA of 2004 was amended to establish standards for seven additional types of appliances. Federal standards have since preempted the standards for all products except for the two listed below. Dates listed in parentheses signify the year when the standard took effect. * Bottle-type water dispensers (2009) * Commercial hot food holding cabinets (2009) Regulations implementing the initial set of standards under the EESA of 2004 were officially adopted by the Maryland Energy Administration (MEA) in June 2006. These new regulations incorporate the EESA amendments enacted June 2005 and address the preemption issues caused by the federal Energy Policy Act of 2005. The 2007 amendments required the Maryland Energy Administration to officially adopt regulations establishing the new standards by January 1, 2008. However, as of June 2010 this task had not been completed. The MEA may delay the effective date of any standard by up to one year if it determines that products conforming to the standard will not be widely available in Maryland by that date. Manufacturers must test products consistent with the testing standards established by the federal government in the Energy Policy Act of 2005. Manufacturers must certify to the MEA that the product is in compliance with the minimum efficiency standards. Certification, proof of testing, and labeling requirements are outlined in the EESA. Every two years the MEA is directed to consider and propose standards to the General Assembly for products not already subject to efficiency standards and revised, more stringent amendments to existing standards. ''* These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.''
    y Independence and Security Act of 2007.''  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes from the Appliance Standards Awareness Project ([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. See the Department of Energy [http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/appliance_standards/index.html Appliance Standards website for additional information on the federal standards.]'' In February 2006, Vermont established appliance efficiency legislation through bill H.0253, An Act Relating to Establishing Energy Efficiency Standards For Certain Appliances. This Act created minimum efficiency standards for certain products sold or installed in Vermont. Note, standards for medium voltage dry-type distribution transformers and metal halide lamp fixtures have been pre-empted by federal standards. The act states that the Vermont Department of Public Service must determine if standards for residential furnaces and boilers require a waiver from federal preemption and if so, must apply for a waiver. Vermont has not done so as of March 2012, and therefore, there are no active standards in VT. ''* These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.''
    y Independence and Security Act of 2007.''  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes from the Appliance Standards Awareness Project ([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. See the Department of Energy [http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/appliance_standards/index.html Appliance Standards] website for additional information.'' Massachusetts’ original appliance standards legislation was enacted in 1986. In November 2005, the standards were expanded, although to date most of the equipment listed in Massachusetts law has since been preempted by federal law. Because of the existing federal standards covering residential furnaces, boilers, and furnace fans, Massachusetts sought a waiver of federal preemption from the warm-state standard. That waiver would have allowed Massachusetts’ cold-state standard to go into effect in 2013. The Massachusetts Attorney General and the Department of Energy Resources (DOER) filed the [http://www.mass.gov/eea/pr-pre-p2/commonwealth-petitions-us-department-of-energy.html waiver petition in October 2009]. The U.S. Department of Energy responded negatively, see the [http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/appliance_standards/state_petitions.html Department of Energy web site] for more information on the petition, comments filed and denial. Therefore, there are no current appliance standards in place in MA. Testing procedures must be developed by the DOER if such procedures are not provided for in the state plumbing code. The DOER must use the U.S. Department of Energy approved test methods and manufacturers must certify that products are in compliance with the standards.The standards state that the DOER must file a biannual report on appliance efficiency standards with the Massachusetts House of Representatives including, but not limited to, an evaluation of the effectiveness of the standards on energy efficiency and energy conservation in Massachusetts. ''* These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.''
    y Independence and Security Act of 2007.''  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes from the Appliance Standards Awareness Project ([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. '' New Jersey Energy Efficiency Product Standards, enacted in 2005, include minimum standards for eight products, seven of which were immediately preempted by the federal Energy Policy Act of 2005. The efficiency standard for the one remaining product, unit heaters, was effective for a little over a year and then preempted by a federal standard in August of 2008. Future standards, if any, adopted by New Jersey will not apply to products manufactured in the State and sold outside the State, new products manufactured outside the State and sold at wholesale inside the State for final retail sale and installation outside the State, products installed in mobile manufactured homes at the time of construction, or products designed expressly for installation and use in recreational vehicles. The Board of Public Utilities (BPU) in consultation with the Commissioner of Environmental Protection, must adopt testing procedures if procedures are not provided for in the standard building code of New Jersey. The board shall use United States Department of Energy approved test methods, or other appropriate nationally-recognized test methods. Manufacturers certify to the board that products are in compliance with the standards. * ''These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. ''
    Independence and Security Act of 2007. ''  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes from the Appliance Standards Awareness Project ([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. '' California’s 2009 Appliance Efficiency Regulations (California Code of Regulations, Title 20, Sections 1601 through1608) were adopted by the California Energy Commission (CEC) on December 3, 2008, and approved by the California Office of Administrative Law on July 10, 2009, replacing all previous versions of the regulations. The Regulations create standards for twenty-three categories of appliances, including standards for both federally-regulated and non-federally-regulated appliances. Of these products, the standards now apply to the following types of new products sold, offered for sale in California, except those sold wholesale in California for final retail sale outside the state and those designed and sold exclusively for use in recreational vehicles or other mobile equipment: # Consumer audio and video products (2006/2007) # Pool pumps (2006/2008/2010) # General service incandescent light bulbs (2011) # Portable lighting fixtures (2010) # Water dispensers (2003) # Hot tubs (portable electric spas) (2009) # Commercial hot food holding cabinets (2006) # Under cabinet fluorescent lamps (2006) # Vending machines (2006) # Wine Chillers (2003) # Televisions (2011) # Small battery chargers that are consumer products (for cell phones, personal care devices, and power tools) (2/1/2013) # Large Industrial battery chargers and USB charger systems with a battery capacity of 20 Wh or more that are consumer products (1/1/2014) # Small battery chargers that are not consumer products (for items such as walkie talkies and portable barcode scanners) (1/1/2017) Dates listed above in parenthesis signify the standard’s effective date. Where more than one date is shown, the standard has more than one level or components which become effective on different dates. See regulations for specific types of appliances covered under these categories. Product-specific testing, certification, and labeling requirements are outlined in the regulations. The CEC is currently in the process of developing regulations for [http://www.energy.ca.gov/appliances/battery_chargers/ battery chargers]. California was the first state to initiate appliance efficiency standards in 1974 with the adoption of the Warren-Alquist Act, which instructed the CEC to promulgate efficiency standards. California has continued to upgrade its standards to remain consistent with new technologies. Most state standards programs have used California’s covered products, or a subset of these products, and its technical procedures as the basis for their efforts. California continues to lead the nation by being the first state to develop efficiency standards for certain [http://www.energy.ca.gov/appliances/2009_tvregs/index.html televisions]. ''* These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.''
    y Independence and Security Act of 2007.''  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes from the Appliance Standards Awareness Project ([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. '' Washington enacted appliance efficiency legislation in 2005, creating minimum efficiency standards for twelve products, all of which have been preempted by federal law. [http://apps.leg.wa.gov/documents/billdocs/2009-10/Pdf/Bills/House%20Passed%20Legislature/1004-S.PL.pdf HB 1004], signed in May 2009, added efficiency standards for several more products, which took effect January 1, 2010. These products include: # Wine chillers designed and sold for use by an individual # Hot water dispensers and mini-tank electric water heaters # Bottle-type water dispensers # Pool heaters, residential pool pumps, and portable electric spas # Commercial hot food holding cabinets Standards do not apply to new products manufactured in Washington and sold outside the State, new products manufactured outside Washington and sold at wholesale inside Washington for final retail sale and installation outside the State, products installed in mobile manufactured homes at the time of construction, or products designed expressly for installation and use in recreational vehicles. The law stipulates that existing standards and test methods may be increased and updated. Any recommendations shall be transmitted to the appropriate committees of the legislature sixty days before the start of any regular legislative session. ''* These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.''
    y Independence and Security Act of 2007.''  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes from the Appliance Standards Awareness Project ([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. '' Arizona’s Appliance and Equipment Efficiency Standards (Arizona Revised Statutes, Title 44, Section 1375) set minimum energy efficiency standards for twelve products, all of which have since been preempted by federal regulation. HB 2332 of 2009 established new standards, effective January 1, 2012 for three additional products: #Portable electric spas #Residential pool pumps #Residential pool pump motors. Specific testing requirements and minimum standards are outlined in the regulations. Manufacturers must certify to the Arizona Department of Commerce Energy Office that products meet minimum efficiency standards. Certification to other states with similar standards that publish databases of compliant products is permitted as an alternative to certifying to the Arizona Department of Commerce Energy Office. New products manufactured in Arizona and sold outside the State are not covered by the regulations. Additionally, the regulations do not apply to products installed in mobile manufactured homes at time of construction, products designed exclusively for installation and use in recreational vehicles, and products installed in a laundry facility located within an apartment complex or mobile home park. The standards stipulate that beginning on May 31, 2008, and every three years thereafter, the Arizona Department of Commerce Energy Office must conduct a comparative review and assessment of the standards and energy efficiency standards adopted in other states and submit a report of its findings and recommendations to the speaker of the house of representatives and president of the senate. ''* These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.''
    y Independence and Security Act of 2007.''  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes from the Appliance Standards Awareness Project ([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. '' Connecticut enacted efficiency standards through legislative actions in 2004 and 2007 and 2011. This law covers the following products that have not been pre-empted by federal standards: (Dates listed in parenthesis signify the year the standard took effect.) * Bottle-type water dispensers (2009) * Commercial hot food holding cabinets (2009) * Hot tubs (2009) * Swimming pool pumps (2010) * Compact Audio Equipment** * DVD Players and Recorders** * Televisions** The standards apply to products manufactured in Connecticut and sold inside the state. Manufacturers must certify to the Secretary of the Office of Policy Management that products comply with the regulations. The standards must be reviewed biennially and increased if it is determined that increased efficiency standards would serve to promote energy conservation and would be cost-effective for consumers. Standards for additional products may be adopted if it is determined that they would serve to promote energy conservation in the state, would be cost-effective for consumers, and that multiple products are available which meet such standards. ''* These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.'' ''**Adopted per legislation enacted July 2011 (SB 1243).''
    legislation enacted July 2011 (SB 1243).''  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes from the Appliance Standards Awareness Project([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. '' New York appliance efficiency standards legislation, enacted in 2005, covers the following products offered for sale in New York not preempted by federal standards as of August 2011: # Consumer audio and video products # Digital television adapters # Commercial hot food holding cabinets # Portable electric spas # Residential pool pumps # Bottle-type water dispensers # Portable light fixtures For consumer audio and video products and digital television adapters, the New York legislation requires the Department of State in consultation with New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) to develop standards by June 30, 2006 and to implement such standards no sooner than six months after issuing final rules. Temporary emergency rules were adopted and renewed several times during 2006 and 2007 but have since expired and not been renewed. The regulatory process for these equipment types appears to be ongoing as of August 2012. Efficiency requirements for the remaining products were adopted by legislation in 2010. The legislation required the Department of State in consultation with NYSERDA to develop regulations by December 31, 2010. As of August 2012, no such regulations have been adopted. New York law also allows the Secretary of State, in consultation with NYSERDA, to add additional products to the list. Any new products added to the list must be commercially available, cost effective on a life-cycle basis, and not covered under existing federal standards. ''* These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.''
    y Independence and Security Act of 2007.''  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes from the Appliance Standards Awareness Project ([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. '' In June 2005, Oregon passed legislation setting minimum energy efficiency standards for 11 appliances. Those products regulated by Oregon law and not currently covered by federal standards include: (Dates listed in parenthesis signify the effective year.) # Bottle-type water dispensers (2009) # Commercial hot food holding cabinets (2009) # Compact audio products (2009) # Digital versatile disc players and digital versatile disc recorders (2009) # Portable electric spas (2009) Testing requirements and minimum efficiency standards are outlined in the regulations. The standards do not apply to products installed in a mobile or manufactured home at the time of construction or designed expressly for installation and use in recreational vehicles. The law stipulates that the State Department of Energy must periodically review the minimum energy efficiency standards and report to the Legislative Assembly when the standards need to be updated, due to federal action or to the outcome of collaborative consultations with manufacturers and the energy departments of other states. ''* These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.''
    y Independence and Security Act of 2007.''  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes from the Appliance Standards Awareness Project ([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site and the U.S. Department of Energy's [http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/appliance_standards/index.html Appliance Standards] site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. '' Rhode Island’s Energy and Consumer Savings Act of 2005 established minimum energy efficiency standards for twelve commercial and residential products, nine of which were immediately preempted by federal law later that year, and another of which was preempted later. Thus far, Rhode Island has adopted and enforces standards for bottle-type water dispensers, mercury vapor lamp ballasts and commercial hot-food holding cabinets. Testing procedures for energy efficiency not provided for in Rhode Island law or in the State Building Code may be adopted from the test methods approved by the U.S. Department of Energy, or in the absence of such test methods, other appropriate nationally recognized test methods. The state may use updated test methods when new versions of test procedures become available. State law allows for the efficiency of existing standards to be increased. In considering amending the standards, the state must must determine that increased efficiency standards would serve to promote energy conservation in Rhode Island and would be cost-effective for consumers who purchase and use such products. ''* These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.''
    y Independence and Security Act of 2007.''  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes from the Appliance Standards Awareness Project ([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. '' In 2007 the District of Columbia (D.C.) enacted legislation, entitled the Energy Efficiency Standards Act of 2007, which created efficiency standards for six products, four of which were immediately preempted by federal law. The efficiency standards thereby apply to bottle-type water dispensers and commercial hot food holding cabinets sold in D.C. on or after January 1, 2009 and installed on or after January 1, 2010. The standards do not apply to new products manufactured in District of Columbia that are sold either outside of D.C. or sold wholesale within D.C. for final retail sale/installation outside of D.C. The standards do not apply to products installed in mobile homes at the time of construction or to products designed for installation and use within recreational vehicles. While these standards apply currently to two products, § 8-1771.04 establishes that the Mayor may adopt rules to either 1) increase efficiency standards for the listed products or 2) establish efficiency standards for products not listed if he/she feels it necessary to further promote energy conservation in D.C. The law further stipulates requirements for testing and certification. ''* These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.''
    y Independence and Security Act of 2007.''  +
  • ''' *Program discontinued''' The Tennesse
    ''' *Program discontinued''' The Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development offers low-interest loans of up to $300,000, with terms of up to 7 years, for energy efficiency projects and other projects shown to save energy or decrease energy demand. Businesses with fewer than 300 employees or less than $3.5 million in annual gross sales or receipts are eligible. The loan is offered with a 0% interest rate for businesses in the Three-Star communities, and at a 3% interest rate for all others. Loans cannot be used for new construction or business start-up. All renewable energy technologies are eligible under the program's guidelines. In addition to low-interest loans, the Energy Division offers free audits and technical assistance.
    fers free audits and technical assistance.  +
  • ''' Note: The Sustainable Energy Fund is n
    ''' Note: The Sustainable Energy Fund is not soliciting grant applications at this time. Please see information about the SEF's loan program.''' The Sustainable Energy Fund of Central Eastern Pennsylvania (SEF) disburses a limited number of grants and loans to organizations seeking funding for projects consistent with the Fund’s mission "to promote research and invest in clean and renewable energy technologies, energy conservation, energy efficiency and sustainable energy enterprises that provide opportunities and benefits for PP&L ratepayers." Research projects are not eligible for grant financing. The SEF was founded in November 1999 as a result of the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission electric utility restructuring proceedings. The SEF was a key component of the joint settlement with PP&L, Inc. (now PP&L Electric Utilities Corporation) and the PUC. The initial SEF funding of approximately $20.5 million will be generated over six years through a rate surcharge on PPL ratepayers. . See DSIRE's summary of Pennsylvania's Public Benefits Funds for more information.
    ublic Benefits Funds for more information.  +
  • ''' Note: The deadline for new application
    ''' Note: The deadline for new applications has now expired, but it is anticipated that the program will be renewed at some point in the future. ''' The Green Business Building Pilot Program will provide grants of up to $100,000 per facility for design assistance for private-sector construction projects that meet a minimum LEED level of gold and achieve energy performance of at least 20 percent above the minimum energy code, while achieving minimum standards for best practices in solid waste management. Eligible facilities must have a minimum of 50,000 square feet of conditioned space, and program participants must contribute a minimum of 10 percent of the total project costs associated with the fees for building design services. Hopeful participants must submit a notice of intent to apply no later than November 15, 2006, and must be able to verify that their project funding is in place and can establish an 18-month deadline by which final construction documents will be completed. Final applications for the grant are due January 2, 2007.
    ons for the grant are due January 2, 2007.  +
  • ''' Note: The program has been suspended a
    ''' Note: The program has been suspended and is undergoing redevelopment. Please check back for future updates. ''' Modeled after the successful Sustainable and Natural Alternative Power (SNAP) program in Chelan County, Washington, Rochester Public Utility's Solar Choice program encourages customers to install photovoltaic solar arrays and connect them to their utilities' electrical distribution system by offering an incentive payment based on the system's production on a $/kWh basis. The amount paid by each participating utility to its solar energy producers depends on the total amount contributed by that utility's purchasers through their solar green pricing program. The greater the amount contributed by purchasers, the greater the amount that will be distributed among participating producers, up to a maximum of $1.00 per kWh. This amount is considered payment for the green attributes of the electricity only, and is additional to retail rates the producer may receive for their electricity under the state's net metering laws. Producers are compensated for the total electricity produced, not the total exported to the grid. The maximum generation project that may be interconnected with the distribution system is 40 kilowatts. Solar Choice is not for customers who want to install renewable energy sources for back-up power generation at their home or business. This program began on October 1, 2005. Actual rates paid to producers will be posted annually.
    paid to producers will be posted annually.  +
  • ''' Note: This program is presently suspen
    ''' Note: This program is presently suspended pending a restructuring of the incentive. Owatonna hopes to reintroduce the program in 2008 as a per KW rebate designed to reduce the up front cost of installing a PV system. ''' Modeled after the successful Sustainable and Natural Alternative Power (SNAP) program in Chelan County, Washington, Owatonna Public Utility's Solar Choice program encourages customers to install photovoltaic solar arrays and connect them to their utilities' electrical distribution system by offering an incentive payment based on the system's production on a $/kWh basis. The amount paid by each participating utility to its solar energy producers depends on the total amount contributed by that utility's purchasers through their solar green pricing program. The greater the amount contributed by purchasers, the greater the amount that will be distributed among participating producers, up to a maximum of $1.00 per kWh. This amount is considered payment for the green attributes of the electricity only, and is additional to retail rates the producer may receive for their electricity under the state's net metering laws. Producers are compensated for the total electricity produced, not the total exported to the grid. The maximum generation project that may be interconnected with the distribution system is 40 kilowatts. Solar Choice is not for customers who want to install renewable energy sources for back-up power generation at their home or business. This program began on October 1, 2005. Actual rates paid to producers will be posted annually.
    paid to producers will be posted annually.  +
  • ''' Note: program removed, included in Eff
    ''' Note: program removed, included in Efficiency United''' Through Efficiency United, Michigan Gas Utilities offers several incentive options to eligible commercial and industrial customers. The programs incent customers to save energy and money through the use of energy efficient technologies. The Prescriptive Gas Measures for Business Customers Program offers various rebates and incentives to commercial and industrial gas customers in the Michigan Gas Utilities service area. Equipment and measures are meant to increase the efficiency and the cost effectiveness of running a customer's business. All equipment must be new and replacing an older system or model. Eligible equipment and measures include steam trap tests and replacements, boilers, boiler tune-ups and controls, pipe wrap, furnaces, infrared heaters, programmable thermostats, occupancy sensors, water heaters, clothes washers and pool heaters. Itemized invoices of equipment costs and installation labor must be included along with new equipment specification sheet. Please wait to receive approval before starting work. Projects must be implemented by December 31, 2010. View program web site listed above to see guidelines and application form. The Commercial and Industrial (C&I) Custom Program provides custom incentives to C&I customers for the installation of energy-efficient equipment and controls. The custom program allows measures and systems to be installed for situations unique to that customer's application or process. MGU will pay up to 40% of a projects cost up to $10,000. Applicants must receive approval prior to beginning project. Rebates will not be provided for project with a payback less than 2 years or greater than 7 years. Complete form and attach invoice of all project costs. Applicants have 120 days to implement project after approval is granted. An application can be found on the program web site listed above. Through the Residential and Small Business Energy Star Program, rebates are also available for water heaters, pipe wrap, faucet aerators and clothes washers. See program [http://www.efficiencyunited.com/resources/Energy_Star_Incentive_Request_Form_MGU.pdf application] for more details on equipment and eligibility.
    more details on equipment and eligibility.  +
  • ''''' Deadline for submissions was July 30
    ''''' Deadline for submissions was July 30, 2010. Applications received after this date will not be considered.''''' The Wisconsin Department of Commerce is offering low-interest loans to for-profit manufacturing companies for projects that support renewable energy and energy efficiency jobs within the state. The program is only available for businesses locating or expanding within the state of Wisconsin. Loans will be issued for up to 25% of project cost at a fixed interest rate of 2% over terms of 5-7 years (working capital) or 5-10 years (equipment). Loan repayment may be deferred for up to one year. The program is intended for businesses that promote: * major renewable energy production projects; * the manufacture of clean energy products; * advanced manufacturing of clean energy components; * retooling to provide component parts and other critical needs for a successful, totally integrated supply chain; * improving industrial users’ competitiveness through energy efficiency and renewable energy deployment. The definitions of eligible renewable energy and energy efficiency related technologies are not specified, but the program website gives several examples possible projects. Project eligibility is limited to those that create or retain jobs through clean energy advanced manufacturing, clean energy supply chain development, and through reduction in the use of fossil fuels at industrial facilities, including the integration of renewable energy into industrial processes. Funds specifically may not be used for construction or building repairs; to purchase buildings or land; or to perform research, development, and demonstration activities for non-commercial technologies. Projects that have already obtained other necessary financing pieces; environmental and zoning permits; and other clearances will be given a high priority under this program. Money to fund this program comes from State Energy Program funds under the federal American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009, otherwise known as the federal stimulus bill. Currently, $28 million in funding is available through this program with up to $5 million set aside for applications in state's cheese industry. The program is eventually expected to have a total budget of $55 million. Please consult the program website for further details or contact the appropriate [http://commerce.wi.gov/BD/BD-AreaDevManagers.html Commerce Area Development Manager] to discuss your project.
    elopment Manager] to discuss your project.  +
  • ''''' Due to the current budgetary constra
    ''''' Due to the current budgetary constraints of the District of Columbia government, program funding has been rescinded for fiscal year 2011. August 15, 2010 was the final day which programs were operational. This does not affect Pepco customers in Maryland. '''''<br> PEPCO offers appliance and lighting rebates to its residential DC customers who purchase select energy efficient products. Rebates are available on CFL light bulbs, refrigerators, room a/c units, and water heaters. Refrigerators and a/c units must be Energy Star qualified and water heaters must have an Efficiency Factor of at least 0.93 to receive rebate. Rebates are available to Pepco DC customers on qualifying purchases at any retail store after September 15, 2009. Rebate applications must include account number, original sales receipt, and must be received within 60 days of purchase. See the program website listed above to view the [http://www.pepco.com/_res/documents/MD%20Rebate%20Application%209_23_09%20FINAL.pdf Appliance Rebate Application] or a list of [http://homeenergysavings.pepco.com/dc/lighting/stores participating CFL retailers.]
    hting/stores participating CFL retailers.]  +
  • ''''' Note: Due to possible funding constr
    ''''' Note: Due to possible funding constraints, all rebate applications must be pre-approved before purchasing any equipment.''''' Groton Utilities, a municipal utility, offers incentives for commercial and industrial customers to install energy-efficient equipment in eligible facilities through several efficiency programs described in detail on the web site above. Rebates for: *efficient lighting retrofits and vending machine controls (based on number of kilowatt-hours (kWh) saved) *new energy-efficient lighting *high-efficiency motors (based on the number, type, and efficiency rating of units installed) *HVAC equipment (based on the system size and efficiency) In some cases the rebate is limited to 50% of the total project cost. Applications are available on the utility's web site, and in some cases an application must be submitted for approval before construction begins. Groton Utilities may perform a post-installation inspection at the utility's discretion. Groton Utilities also offers cash incentives for customers who participate in the utility's [http://www.grotonutilities.com/conserv.asp?l=1 Demand Response Program]. This voluntary program requires customers to reduce electricity consumption when the electric system is severely constrained and the price of electricity is high.
    ined and the price of electricity is high.  +
  • ''''' Note: Rates listed below are for far
    ''''' Note: Rates listed below are for farmers who signed up for the program by January 1, 2011. Information regarding future funding opportunities will be posted here when it becomes available. ''''' The Missouri Agricultural and Small Business Development Authority (MASBDA) is now offering incentives to livestock farmers in the form of assistance with loans for energy efficiency. The "Missouri Agricultural Energy Saving Team - a Revolutionary Opportunity," or MAESTRO, offers assistance in the form of Interest Buy Downs, Cash Down Payments, a Loan Loss Reserve, and Audit Rebates. <b>Implementation Grant</b>: MASBDA will provide up to $12,000 of cost-share, not to exceed 75% of the total retrofit project. A farmer can use up to $3,000 of that amount for home upgrades. Installed retrofits must result in at least 15% energy savings. <b>Interest Buy Down</b>: MASBDA will pay for a portion of the interest due on loans for energy efficiency technologies. The loan interest rate will be reduced to 3%. The lender receives the difference in interest payments in one lump sum. For example, if the loan was $25,000 at a 6.5% interest rate for 5 years, with monthly payments, the interest would have been $4,349.26. The same loan at 3% interest would be $1,953.02 in interest. Therefore, the lender would receive a payment of $2,386.24 ($4,349.26-$1,953.02). <b>Cash Down Payment</b>: Farmers can also choose a Cash Down Payment. The payment is calculated as above, but instead of the lender receiving the payment, the farmer receives the payment. If the farmer chooses this option, the loan interest rate remains the same instead of decreasing to 3%. <b>Loan Loss Reserve</b>: MASBDA has established a dedicated fund for the purpose of guaranteeing payments on defaulted loans. When farmers apply for a loan from a lender, the farmer and lender submit an application to the MASBDA for the Loan Loss Reserve. If approved, the program guarantees to the lender that if the farmer defaults on the loan, MASBDA will pay up to 75% of the loan. <b>Audit Rebates</b>: MASBDA is offering rebates of up to $125 for a farm audit and $125 for a home audit. Farmers can only qualify for the rebate if one or more of the audit recommendations are implemented and the energy savings realized are at least 15%. To begin the application process for one of the above options, interested livestock farmers must first sign up for a comprehensive farm audit. The audit will identify efficiency technologies that should be installed at the farm or farm house. Only these technologies are eligible for the Interest Buy Down, Cash Down Payment, or Loan Loss Reserve programs. To participate in the program, interested farmers should contact EnSave at 1-800-732-1399 to set up an initial assessment. In order to qualify for the MAESTRO program, applicants must be legal Missouri residents that operate animal agricultural farmers. Loans must be from a state or national bank, farm credit system, bank for cooperatives, federal or state chartered savings and loan association, federal or state building and loan association or a small business investment company. All energy efficiency technology must be installed and operational by November 30, 2012. <i>This program is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) [http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/betterbuildings/neighborhoods/ BetterBuildings Program]. The DOE has awarded over $500 million in federal funds to more than 40 states, local governments, and organizations to administer local programs targeting a variety of building types. Combined, these local programs are expected to improve the efficiency of more than 170,000 buildings through 2013 and save up to $65 million in energy costs annually.</i>
    illion in energy costs annually.</i>  +
  • ''''' Note: THIS PROGRAM HAS EXPIRED FOR 2
    ''''' Note: THIS PROGRAM HAS EXPIRED FOR 2008 AND NOT YET REOPENED FOR 2009''''' This program is offered to Data Centers in the Oncor service area to encourage energy efficiency upgrades. It provides incentive dollars for installing energy efficient measures in data center facilities, including virtualization solutions and high efficiency UPS and HVAC system upgrades (and others - see program materials). Demand reduction measures are eligible for an incentive of $150/kW and energy usage reductions may receive an incentive of $0.0175/kWh. There are no project size limits specified for this program. This program also provides funds to offset the cost of completing assessments needed to establish which projects may provide the largest energy savings potential. Assessment assistance levels depend on project size and completion date. The details are listed in the program incentive schedule above. Projects must be completed by November 30, 2008 in order to be eligible for any of the incentives listed above. CLEAResult Consulting is the implementing contractor for Oncor Electric Delivery's Data Center Energy Management Program in Texas.
    Center Energy Management Program in Texas.  +
  • ''''''''Note: The SunSense Program will re
    ''''''''Note: The SunSense Program will resume for 2015 and begin accepting applications on January 14, 2015 at 1:30 PM. '''On November 25th. 2014 the Florida PSC voted to end a solar pilot program at the end of 2015 that requires independently owned utilities to offer solar rebates. This program will not be offered after 2015.''''''''''' Progress Energy Florida (PEF) has allocated $1.9 million per year towards residential photovoltaic (PV) incentives. PEF will accept applications annually from residential customers both wishing to install a PV system and qualifying for a rebate. Reservations for a rebate will be issued on a first-come basis, however a reservation does not guarantee that a rebate will be awarded, only that funding for a rebate is available should the system be installed, meet all requirements and pass inspection. To qualify for the residential PV program, an applicant must be a Progress Energy Florida (PEF) customer and a homeowner. The applicant must also be the account holder, use the home as a primary residence and own the solar PV system  installed on the home. Other requirements include: * PEF must approve application and conduct an on-site Home Energy Check (HEC) prior to PV system installation * The proposed PV system must be certified and approved by the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) * Systems must be installed by a licensed contractor, meet electric and safety standards * Participating customers’ systems must be directly connected to the PEF system by following the [https://www.progress-energy.com/company/electricity-system/interconnect/florida/index.page? DEF interconnection procedures]. Customers with PV systems ranging in size from 2 kW DC to 10 kW DC are eligible to participate and may earn an incentive based on the kW value. Installations of systems system larger than 10 kW are permissible, but the incentive is limited to a maximum of $20,000 per residence. After installation, the PV system must be capable of producing at least 1,000 kWh per kW DC each year. Once the limit of $1.9 million in rebates is achieved, the application process will be closed. The process will be re-opened again October 1 of each year for systems to be installed the following calendar year. For an application checklist, further requirements and additional resources regarding the rebate please visit the[https://www.progress-energy.com/florida/home/save-energy-money/energy-efficiency-improvements/sunsense/solar-pv.page? DEF Solar PV website].
    ense/solar-pv.page? DEF Solar PV website].  +
  • '''''*This program has been deactivated an
    '''''*This program has been deactivated and is now part of the Efficiency United entry''''' Alpena Power Company offers rebates, assistance and other incentives through the Efficiency United program, which is a partnership between 11 Michigan utilities. The program is intended to provide assistance and incentives to customers who install or employ energy efficient equipment or measures which save money and energy at home and at work. The Energy Star Appliance Rebate Program is one part of this program. Alpena offers the Residential HVAC Program, which provides incentives to residential customers for installing energy efficient central air conditioning units and ECM blower motors. Incentives will be provided to the home owner and will be based on fulfilling energy efficiency standards. See Efficiency United web site listed above for further information regarding program guidelines and incentives.
    garding program guidelines and incentives.  +
  • '''''*This program has been deactivated an
    '''''*This program has been deactivated and is now part of the Efficiency United entry''''' The Commercial and Industrial Rebate Program offers several options to business customers in the Alpena service area. The programs incent customers to save energy and money through the use of energy efficient technologies. The Prescriptive Commercial and Industrial Program offers incentives for various efficient hvac measures, motors, fans, pumps, drives, water heaters, refrigeration measures, cooking equipment, lighting fixtures, systems and controls. Applications must have complete information and be submitted with an invoice itemizing the new equipment purchased and the manufacturer specification sheets. Invoice must indicate date of purchase, size, type, make, model and project cost. To qualify lighting must be used a minimum of 1,800 hours per year. Purchased and installed equipment must not receive an incentive larger than $10,000. Customers must receive written approval before installation. The Commercial and Industrial (C&I) Custom Program provides custom incentives to C&I customers for the installation of energy-efficient equipment and controls. The custom program allows measures and systems to be installed for situations unique to that customer's application or process. Incentives are offered on a per kW and kWh schedule, based on projected savings. Applicants must receive approval prior to beginning project. Complete form and attach invoice of all project costs. Contact Alpena Power Company for more information or an application. Small businesses are also available for the Residential and Small Business Energy Star Program. This program provides rebates for the purchase of efficient CFL bulbs ($1) and energy star clothes washers ($50). Replacement washers must be CEE Tier 2 or 3 to qualify. View web site listed above for more program information.
    listed above for more program information.  +
  • '''''*This record is for information purpo
    '''''*This record is for information purposes only.* TSI will no longer accept applications for Solar Installation Grants. The program received more applications than ARRA allocations could support. TSI will re-open the program should additional funds become available.''''' The Tennessee Solar Institute is a collaboration between the University of Tennessee and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, established in 2009. Using funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), the Solar Institute began offering grants* for solar installations in June 2010. Only business entities (including commercial, industrial and agricultural businesses) and non-profit organizations (with 501c3 designation) are eligible to apply. Systems owned by third parties are eligible for funding. Pre-approval is required for all projects. All projects must be built by December 31, 2011, and must follow ARRA reporting requirements in order to receiving funding. Awards totaling half of the $9 million allocated for this initiative have been announced as of August 2010. A full technical review along with the detailed application is required to receive the solar installation incentive. *'' These grants are available on a first-come, first-served basis as long as the project complies with the program guidelines and meets all eligibility requirements and funding is available. In a typical "grant" program, there is some sort of competition and/or ranking of qualified applicants. This program resembles a rebate program rather than a grant program.''
    ate program rather than a grant program.''  +
  • '''''2013 Update: Phase II of the Qualifyi
    '''''2013 Update: Phase II of the Qualifying Advanced Energy Project is open. Required concept papers are due to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by April 9, 2013. The U.S. DOE will review concept papers and select which companies will be allowed to submit a full application. Applications are due July 23, 2013. Concept papers and applications must follow guidelines and are to be submitted electronically via the EERE eXCHANGE web site (see web link above).'''''<br> <br> ''The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009'' established an investment tax credit to encourage the development of a U.S.-based renewable energy manufacturing sector. The investment tax credit is equal to 30% of the qualified investment required for an advanced energy project that establishes, re-equips or expands a manufacturing facility that produces any of the following: * Equipment and/or technologies used to produced energy from the sun, wind, geothermal or "other" renewable resources * Fuel cells, microturbines or energy-storage systems for use with electric or hybrid-electric motor vehicles * Equipment used to refine or blend renewable fuels * Equipment and/or technologies to produce energy-conservation technologies (including energy-conserving lighting technologies and smart grid technologies)* Qualified investments generally include personal tangible property that is depreciable and required for the production process. Other tangible property may be considered a qualified investment only if it is an essential part of the facility, excluding buildings and structural components.<br> <br> Based on recommendations from the U.S. DOE, the U.S. Treasury Department (Treasury) will issue certifications for qualified investments eligible for credits to qualifying advanced energy project sponsors. After certification is granted, the taxpayer has one year to provide additional evidence that the requirements of the certification have been met and three years to put the project in service. There are provisions for credit recapture for non-compliance. There is a total of $150 million available for this phase of the Advanced Energy Manufacturing Tax Credit program.<br> <br> In determining which projects to certify, the U.S. DOE and Treasury must consider those which most likely will be commercially viable, provide the greatest domestic job creation, provide the greatest net reduction of air pollution and/or greenhouse gases, have great potential for technological innovation and commercial deployment, have the lowest levelized cost of generated (or stored) energy ''or'' the lowest levelized cost of reduction in energy consumption or greenhouse gas emissions, ''and'' have the shortest project time.<br> <br> Any taxpayer receiving this credit may '''not '''also receive the federal [http://www.dsireusa.org/library/includes/incentive2.cfm?Incentive_Code=US02F&State=federal¤tpageid=1&ee=1&re=1 business energy investment tax credit]. <br> ''* This credit could be expanded in the future to include other energy technologies that reduce greenhouse gas emissions, as determined by the U.S. Treasury Department.''
    ermined by the U.S. Treasury Department.''  +
  • '''''A Delaware SREC Pilot Procurement Pro
    '''''A Delaware SREC Pilot Procurement Program was approved in November of 2011 by the Delaware Public Service Commission. The program is expected to begin in April 2012, the details of the pilot program can be found [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=DE24F&re=1&ee=1 here].''''' In 2005, Senate Bill 74 established a [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=DE06R&re=1&ee=1 renewables portfolio standard (RPS)] requiring Delaware retail electricity suppliers to purchase 10% of the electricity sold in the state from renewable sources by 2019. [http://legis.delaware.gov/LIS/LIS144.NSF/vwLegislation/SB+19?Opendocument Senate Bill 19 of 2007] increased the RPS target to 20%, and added a requirement that a portion of the requirement be met with solar photovoltaic (PV) resources. The standard was expanded again to 25% renewables and 3.5% photovoltaics by 2026 by [http://delcode.delaware.gov/sessionlaws/ga145/chp451.shtml S.S. 1 for S.B. 119] enacted in July 2010. The PV target began at 0.011% for the June 2008 - May 2009 compliance year (CY 2009) and accelerates slowly over time towards an ultimate target of 3.5% for compliance year 2025-2026. The RPS applies to the state's investor-owned utilities, retail electricity suppliers, municipal utilities, and rural electric cooperatives. Municipal utilities and rural electric cooperatives are allowed to opt out of the RPS requirements if they establish a comparable RPS program for their own ratepayers by 2013, and establish a green energy fund. Under Delaware law, a solar renewable energy credit (SREC), is equivalent to one megawatt-hour (MWh) of retail electricity sales in the state that is derived from a qualifying PV resource. Electricity suppliers must purchase SRECs in order to meet their compliance obligations under the law, or pay a Solar Alternative Compliance Payment (SACP) for any shortfalls in SREC purchases. The SACP operates as a ceiling on the price that a supplier would pay for SRECs used for compliance with the Delaware RPS. In general, the SACP is initially set at $400 per MWh, but increases to $450 per MWh if the electricity supplier has opted for the ACP in any previous year, and then increases to $500 with any subsequent uses. The Delaware Energy Office has the authority to review and adjust the ACP and SACP given certain market conditions. As of August 2012, sales of Delaware-sourced SRECs tracked on the [http://www.pjm-eis.com/ PJM-EIS Generation Attributes Tracking System (GATS)] averaged $189 per MWh, down from $260 MWh average for June 2010-August 2011. Under this system SRECs represent a potentially significant source of revenue for owners of qualifying PV facilities with a value determined by demand in the trading market. In Delaware, net metering customers retain ownership of SRECs (or RECs) for energy produced and consumed by the customer. A generator remains eligible to generate SRECs for as long as the facility remains certified as an eligible generator. SRECs submitted for compliance with the RPS must have been created no more than three years prior to the year in which they are used for compliance. In other words, an SREC may generally be used for compliance by an obligated electricity supplier for the compliance year during which it was generated or the two subsequent compliance years.* An obligated entity may use an SREC to comply with the PV carve-out of the RPS or with the general renewables requirement. For the purposes of compliance, an SREC generated by a customer-sited facility physically located within Delaware and installed on or before December 31, 2014 is granted a 300% multiplier if used to fulfill the general renewables requirement. Thus, one SREC equals one SREC for the PV carve-out, but three RECs used to fulfill the general renewables requirement.** In order to begin producing Delaware-eligible SRECs, generators must be certified by the Delaware Public Service Commission (PSC) as an eligible generator. In order to qualify as an eligible generator, customer-sited facilities (i.e., behind the meter facilities) must be physically located within the state of Delaware. Generation from other facilities qualifies for Delaware's standard if the generator is located within the PJM footprint, or if the electricity is imported into the PJM and tracked through the PJM Market Settlement System. When the generator has been issued a certification number, they may create an account with the PJM-EIS Generation Attribute Tracking System (GATS). The GATS is used to track the generation and transfer of SRECs from an eligible facility. SRECs are created in the GATS based on energy production meter readings uploaded to the system by the generator. Unlike some other states, Delaware does not allow small generators to use engineering estimates of energy production as the basis for creating SRECs. The passage of [http://www.legis.delaware.gov/LIS/lis146.nsf/vwLegislation/SB+124/$file/legis.html?open S. B. 124] in July of 2011 amended the Delaware RPS to allow energy output from a Qualified Fuel Cell Provider Project in fulfilling a portion of the requirements under the RPS Act. A qualified fuel cell provider project is a fuel cell power generation project located in Delaware owned and/or operated by a Qualified Fuel Cell Provider. A qualified provider is defined in S.B. 124 as a commercial operation which manufactures fuel cells capable of being run on renewable fuels and is designated as an economic development opportunity by the Delaware Economic Development Office and the DNREC. The energy produced by such projects shall fulfill the commission-regulated electric company's state-mandated REC and SREC requirements. The fulfillment of the equivalent of 1 REC is equal to each MWh of energy. These projects will fulfill no more than 30% of the SREC requirements at a ratio of 6 MWh of RECs per 1MWh of SRECs. ''* The Delaware Sustainable Energy Utility (SEU) is required to act as a REC aggregator for customer-sited renewable energy facilities. The three-year REC lifetime is "tolled", or suspended, during any period in which a REC is held by the SEU. ** Delaware also has allows a small credit bonus of 10% for solar electricity produced by solar (or wind) installations for which at least 50% of the equipment (on the basis of cost) is manufactured in Delaware, or for which 75% of the labor and construction is performed by an in-state workforce.''
    n is performed by an in-state workforce.''  +
  • '''''A Delaware SREC Pilot Procurement Pro
    '''''A Delaware SREC Pilot Procurement Program was approved in November of 2011 by the Delaware Public Service Commission. The details of the pilot program can be found''''' '''''[http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=DE24F&re=1&ee=1 here].''''' In 2005, Senate Bill 74 established a [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=DE06R&re=1&ee=1 renewables portfolio standard (RPS)] requiring Delaware retail electricity suppliers to purchase 10% of the electricity sold in the state from renewable sources by 2019. [http://legis.delaware.gov/LIS/LIS144.NSF/vwLegislation/SB+19?Opendocument Senate Bill 19 of 2007] increased the RPS target to 20%, and added a requirement that a portion of the requirement be met with solar photovoltaic (PV) resources. The standard was expanded again to 25% renewables and 3.5% photovoltaics by 2026 by [http://delcode.delaware.gov/sessionlaws/ga145/chp451.shtml S.S. 1 for S.B. 119] enacted in July 2010. The PV target began at 0.011% for the June 2008 - May 2009 compliance year (CY 2009) and accelerates slowly over time towards an ultimate target of 3.5% for compliance year 2025-2026. The RPS applies to the state's investor-owned utilities, retail electricity suppliers, municipal utilities, and rural electric cooperatives. Municipal utilities and rural electric cooperatives are allowed to opt out of the RPS requirements if they establish a comparable RPS program for their own ratepayers by 2013, and establish a green energy fund.<br> <br> Under Delaware law, a solar renewable energy credit (SREC), is equivalent to one megawatt-hour (MWh) of retail electricity sales in the state that is derived from a qualifying PV resource. Electricity suppliers must purchase SRECs in order to meet their compliance obligations under the law, or pay a Solar Alternative Compliance Payment (SACP) for any shortfalls in SREC purchases. The SACP operates as a ceiling on the price that a supplier would pay for SRECs used for compliance with the Delaware RPS. In general, the SACP is initially set at $400 per MWh, but increases to $450 per MWh if the electricity supplier has opted for the ACP in any previous year, and then increases to $500 for subsequent years. The Delaware Energy Office has the authority to review and adjust the ACP and SACP given certain market conditions. As of October 2014, sales of Delaware-sourced SRECs tracked on the [http://www.srectrade.com/ SRECTrade] averaged $55 per MWh. <br> <br> Under this system SRECs represent a potentially significant source of revenue for owners of qualifying PV facilities with a value determined by demand in the trading market. In Delaware, net metering customers retain ownership of SRECs (or RECs) for energy produced and consumed by the customer. A generator remains eligible to generate SRECs for as long as the facility remains certified as an eligible generator. SRECs submitted for compliance with the RPS must have been created no more than three years prior to the year in which they are used for compliance. In other words, an SREC may generally be used for compliance by an obligated electricity supplier for the compliance year during which it was generated or the two subsequent compliance years.* An obligated entity may use an SREC to comply with the PV carve-out of the RPS or with the general renewables requirement. For the purposes of compliance, an SREC generated by a customer-sited facility physically located within Delaware and installed on or before December 31, 2014 is granted a 300% multiplier if used to fulfill the general renewables requirement. Thus, one SREC equals one SREC for the PV carve-out, but three RECs used to fulfill the general renewables requirement.*<br> <br> In order to begin producing Delaware-eligible SRECs, generators must be certified by the Delaware Public Service Commission (PSC) as an eligible generator. In order to qualify as an eligible generator, customer-sited facilities (i.e., behind the meter facilities) must be physically located within the state of Delaware. Generation from other facilities qualifies for Delaware's standard if the generator is located within the PJM footprint, or if the electricity is imported into the PJM and tracked through the PJM Market Settlement System. When the generator has been issued a certification number, they may create an account with the PJM-EIS Generation Attribute Tracking System (GATS). The GATS is used to track the generation and transfer of SRECs from an eligible facility. SRECs are created in the GATS based on energy production meter readings uploaded to the system by the generator. Unlike some other states, Delaware does not allow small generators to use engineering estimates of energy production as the basis for creating SRECs. <br> The passage of [http://www.legis.delaware.gov/LIS/lis146.nsf/vwLegislation/SB+124/$file/legis.html?open S. B. 124 ]in July of 2011 amended the Delaware RPS to allow energy output from a Qualified Fuel Cell Provider Project in fulfilling a portion of the requirements under the RPS Act. A qualified fuel cell provider project is a fuel cell power generation project located in Delaware owned and/or operated by a Qualified Fuel Cell Provider. A qualified provider is defined in S.B. 124 as a commercial operation which manufactures fuel cells capable of being run on renewable fuels and is designated as an economic development opportunity by the Delaware Economic Development Office and the DNREC. The energy produced by such projects shall fulfill the commission-regulated electric company's state-mandated REC and SREC requirements. The fulfillment of the equivalent of 1 REC is equal to each MWh of energy. These projects will fulfill no more than 30% of the SREC requirements at a ratio of 6 MWh of RECs per 1MWh of SRECs.<br> <br> ''* The Delaware Sustainable Energy Utility (SEU) is required to act as a REC aggregator for customer-sited renewable energy facilities. The three-year REC lifetime is "tolled", or suspended, during any period in which a REC is held by the SEU.<br> <br> ** Delaware also has allows a small credit bonus of 10% for solar electricity produced by solar (or wind) installations for which at least 50% of the equipment (on the basis of cost) is manufactured in Delaware, or for which 75% of the labor and construction is performed by an in-state workforce.''
    n is performed by an in-state workforce.''  +
  • '''''Applications are now being considered
    '''''Applications are now being considered on a case-by-case basis. School districts interested in applying for loans should contact Ron Graham, Executive Director of the Energy Efficient Schools Initiative, directly.''''' The Energy Efficient Schools Initiative (EESI) was created in May 2008 to provide [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=TN56F&re=1&ee=1 grants] and loans to Tennessee school systems for capital outlay projects that meet energy efficient design and technology guidelines for school facilities. All school systems in Tennessee are eligible to apply. Possible projects include lighting upgrades, HVAC upgrades, and other projects that meet pre-determined energy use objectives. The maximum loan is $66/student (at the district level). School districts that already executed loans totaling less than $1 million cannot refinance existing loans, but they can apply for an additional loan as long as the combined total does not exceed $1 million. In addition, the Technical Advisory Committee will review $30 million worth of loans, which have a $5 million cap per school district. The committee will submit its choices to the EESI Council. State government appropriated the original funding ($90 million) with a onetime transfer from the Lottery for Education Account reserve and Lottery for Education special reserve account for K-12 capital outlay. Additional money to the fund comes from interest earnings and other funds secured by the Energy Efficient Schools Council. The Council is part of the Department of Education.
    il is part of the Department of Education.  +
  • '''''Applications for grants under the 201
    '''''Applications for grants under the 2011 solicitation were due by 2:00 PM on April 4, 2011.''''' The North Carolina Green Business Fund, created in 2007, provides funding to North Carolina small and mid-size businesses, nonprofit organizations, state agencies and local governments to encourage the development and commercialization of "promising" renewable energy and green building technologies. Grants of up to $500,000 are available for the development of commercial innovations and applications in the biofuels industry, sustainable building practices and private sector investment in renewable energy technologies. North Carolina-based businesses and nonprofits with fewer than 100 employees, as well as state and local governmental entities, are generally eligible. Grants in the green building sector may be awarded for innovation in areas of installation, certification or distribution of green building materials; energy audits; workforce development; and marketing and sales. For private sector investment in clean technologies, grants may target renewable energy deployment, biomass energy projects, waste reclamation for energy, implementation of energy efficiency technologies and clean distributed generation infrastructure improvements. Grants are also available for the development, production and distribution of biofuels in North Carolina. The 2011 solicitation had a total of $3 million. This solicitation is now closed.
    million. This solicitation is now closed.  +
  • '''''As of 12/7/2010, funding for this pro
    '''''As of 12/7/2010, funding for this program is fully reserved. Applications received after this date will be placed on a waiting list in case additional funding becomes available.''''' The Minnesota Small Wind Turbine Rebate program provides financial support to commercial businesses that install Small Wind Turbine systems. Here, Small Wind Turbine systems are those with rated capacities at or less than thirty five kilowatts (35 kW) at 24.6 miles per hour (mph). Eligibility is determined by nature and size of the business, site designated for installation and equipment selected. The rebate amount is 35% of eligible system and installation costs, up to $ 25,000. Rebates will be awarded on a first-come, first-served basis until all available funds have been reserved. A rebate application must be approved by the Minnesota Office of Energy Security before any equipment is ordered, purchased, or installed. A Rebate Confirmation Form and Rebate Claim Form will be mailed to the applicant upon application approval. Visit the [http://www.state.mn.us/portal/mn/jsp/content.do?id=-536893811&subchannel=null&sc2=null&sc3=null&contentid=536920558&contenttype=EDITORIAL&programid=536917401&agency=Energy Minnesota Small Wind Commercial Rebate webpage] to obtain more further information on rebate application steps '''Participant Eligibility''' Small businesses with 20 or fewer full-time employees are eligible. A facility owned by a non-profit organized under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code is eligible provided that the facility is used for a commercial activity. '''Commercial Site Requirements''' The location for installation must be within the state borders of Minnesota. In addition, the site must register a minimum of 12 mph at wind system hub height. See the [http://www.state.mn.us/portal/mn/jsp/content.do?id=-536893809&subchannel=-536895045&sc2=null&sc3=null&contentid=536919721&contenttype=EDITORIAL&programid=536917287&agency=Energy Minnesota OES Wind Speed Verification Tool] in order to determine your location’s average annual wind speed: Wind Speed Verification Tool '''Qualifying Installation and Technology''' The wind system must have a minimum average wind speed of 12.0 mph at hub height. Eligible wind system models are listed on the MN OES Commercial Small Wind Rebate website. The small wind system must be installed by a bonded and/or licensed contractor, as applicable to state and local ruling. The installation must be finished within 180 days of rebate application approval.
    n 180 days of rebate application approval.  +
  • '''''As of 12/7/2010, funding for this pro
    '''''As of 12/7/2010, funding for this program is fully reserved. Applications received after 12/7/2010 will be placed on a waiting list in case funding becomes available.''''' The Minnesota Office of Energy Security (OES) is offering rebates to offset the up-front cost of installing small wind energy generation devices at existing primary residences in Minnesota. Systems are limited to a maximum rated capacity of 35 kilowatts (kW) at a wind speed of 24.6 mph. Qualifying systems are eligible for a rebate of 35% of installed system costs up to a maximum rebate of $10,000 and incentive amounts may not exceed the total cost of the system minus the cost of any federal, utility, or other incentives. Although the program opened in May 2010, systems installed on or after July 1, 2009 that meet the program requirements are eligible for incentives. For systems beginning construction after April 30, 2010, participants must submit an application to reserve funding prior to installing the system. The system must be installed within 180 days of receiving a reservation confirmation in order to qualify for a rebate. Both grid-connected and off-grid systems are eligible for incentives. However, system eligibility is limited to a list of specific wind turbine models contained in the program application and a variety of additional equipment, installation, and warranty requirements apply to systems and major components. Notably, applicants must demonstrate that the site wind resource is sufficient for wind generation (minimum 12 mph at hub height) and tower heights must be at least 80 feet unless the applicant can demonstrate that the minimum wind speed is available at a lower height. This requirement can be met using the Minnesota Wind Verification Tool on the program web site, or through a site assessment report from a Midwest Renewable Energy Association (MREA) certified site assessor. The OES also suggests that prospective participants explore options for improving the energy efficiency of their home prior to installing a wind energy system. A total of $500,000 is available under this program, funded from State Energy Program (SEP) funds under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Applications will be accepted on a first-come, first-served basis until available funding is exhausted. Please see the program web site and rebate application for additional details.
    rebate application for additional details.  +
  • '''''As of March 24, 2010, the reservation
    '''''As of March 24, 2010, the reservation period for the second round of funding is closed. Additional rounds of funding are not anticipated.''''' The Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals, and Energy (DMME) is utilizing up to $15 million over three years to provide rebates on solar thermal heating, solar photovoltaic (PV) installations (up to 10 kW for residential), and for small wind systems (up to 10 kW for residential). The funding was made available from the State Energy Program allocation from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The two-step application includes a rebate reservation request. This request is made via the online submission portal found at the DMME's website. Rebate recipients are subject to audits and certification. Applicants will be required to submit documentation of work in addition to the completed reservation form and rebate application. In general, all applicants are required to comply with local, state and federal building, fire and safety codes and are responsible for obtaining building permits (as required) or other permits/documentation that may be required (in the case of historical structures). Interested applicants must read through the [http://www.dmme.virginia.gov/DE/ARRA-Public/RenewableEnergyRebateTerms.pdf Terms and Conditions] carefully, as there are many additional requirements and stipulations to consider. ''*CEC-AC is a system's capacity rating based on PVUSA Test Conditions (PTC) and inverter efficiency.''
    onditions (PTC) and inverter efficiency.''  +
  • '''''As of March 24, 2010, the reservation
    '''''As of March 24, 2010, the reservation period for the second round of funding is closed. Additional rounds of funding are not anticipated.''''' The Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals, and Energy (DMME) is utilizing up to $15 million over three years to provide rebates on solar thermal heating, solar photovoltaic (PV) installations and small wind systems. The funding was made available from the State Energy Program allocation from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The two-step application includes a rebate reservation request. This request is made via the online submission portal found at the DMME's website. Rebate recipients are subject to audits and certification. Applicants will be required to submit documentation of work in addition to the completed reservation form and rebate application. In general, all applicants are required to comply with local, state and federal building, fire and safety codes and are responsible for obtaining building permits (as required) or other permits/documentation that may be required (in the case of historical structures or in the case that their project will be subject to review under the National Environmental Policy Act). Interested applicants must read through the [http://www.dmme.virginia.gov/DE/ARRA-Public/RenewableEnergyRebateTerms.pdf Terms and Conditions] carefully, as there are many additional requirements and stipulations to consider. ''*CEC-AC is a system's capacity rating based on PVUSA Test Conditions (PTC) and inverter efficiency.''
    onditions (PTC) and inverter efficiency.''  +
  • '''''As of March 26, 2010, the Virginia De
    '''''As of March 26, 2010, the Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals, and Energy is no longer accepting reservations. This program is fully subscribed and the information here is for informational purposes only.''''' The Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals, and Energy (DMME) are providing rebates for a variety of energy efficiency upgrades. In all cases, the energy efficient equipment must replace older, less efficient, in-use equipment. The second round of funding has up to $6.5 million for rebates for residents that invest in energy efficiency improvements, retrofits, or replacement of old inefficient equipment with approved energy efficient equipment in their homes.* For a list of energy efficiency technologies and services eligible for rebates, review DMME's [http://www.dmme.virginia.gov/DE/ARRA-Public/EEMeasuresRequirements.shtml list]. The application is a two-step process. Residents MUST first submit a reservation application to be eligible for a rebate. Equipment purchased on or after June 26, 2009 is eligible. In most cases, applicants will be required to submit a Manufacturer's Certification Statement and in some cases, the contractor will be required to calculate estimated or expected energy savings of the efficiency upgrades. Applicants should read DMME's [http://www.dmme.virginia.gov/DE/ARRA-Public/EEGenTermsConditions.shtml Terms and Conditions] carefully as well as see the Frequently Asked Questions, which provide additional guidance. *''This $6.5 million is the total available to fund both residential and commercial rebates.''
    both residential and commercial rebates.''  +
  • '''''As of March 26, 2010, the Virginia De
    '''''As of March 26, 2010, the Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals, and Energy is no longer accepting reservations. This program is fully subscribed and the information here is for informational purposes only.''''' The Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals, and Energy (DMME) are providing rebates for a variety of energy efficiency upgrades. In all cases, the energy efficient equipment must replace older, less efficient, in-use equipment. The second round of funding has up to $6.5 million for rebates for commercial, agricultural, and "light industrial" businesses that invest in energy efficiency improvements, retrofits, or replacement of old inefficient equipment with approved energy efficient equipment in their businesses. For a list of energy efficiency technologies and services eligible for rebates, review DMME's [http://www.dmme.virginia.gov/DE/ARRA-Public/EEMeasuresRequirements.shtml list]. The application is a two-step process. Businesses MUST first submit a reservation application to be eligible for a rebate. Equipment purchased on or after June 26, 2009 is eligible. In most cases, applicants will be required to submit a Manufacturer's Certification Statement and in some cases, the contractor will be required to calculate estimated or expected energy savings of the efficiency upgrades. Applicants should read DMME's [http://www.dmme.virginia.gov/DE/ARRA-Public/EEGenTermsConditions.shtml Terms and Conditions] carefully as well as see the Frequently Asked Questions, which provide additional guidance.
    stions, which provide additional guidance.  +
  • '''''As of October 23, 2008, this program
    '''''As of October 23, 2008, this program is suspended until further notice. More details will be provided on the program website as they become available.''''' Arizona Public Service (APS), an investor-owned utility, has partnered with the Electric and Gas Industries Association (EGIA) and participating contractors to help facilitate unsecured financing through the GEOSmart® Sustainable Financing Solutions program. Under this program, APS customers may receive a loan of up to $50,000, with interest rates as low as 7.99%, for a solar-energy system. The loan may be combined with the APS [http://www.dsireusa.org/library/includes/incentive2.cfm?Incentive_Code=AZ04F&state=AZ&CurrentPageID=1&RE=1&EE=1 Renewable Incentive Program]. Customers can choose from three basic financing plans; more details are available on the program web site. At this time, loans may be used to install photovoltaic (PV) systems and solar water heaters. Eventually, APS plans to provide financing for solar space heating and small wind systems as well. Note that other financing or lease options may also be available from installers or other financial institutions.
    nstallers or other financial institutions.  +
  • '''''As part of Ohio’s Tax Reform personal
    '''''As part of Ohio’s Tax Reform personal property tax will be phased-out by 2009 and corporate franchise tax will be phased-out by 2010 for most taxpayers.''''' Ohio may provide an exemption for certain property from real and personal property taxation,* state sales and use taxes, and the state's corporate franchise tax where applicable. The exemption applies to property used in energy conversion, thermal-efficiency improvements and the conversion of solid waste to energy. Generally, "energy conversion" refers to the replacement of fossil-fuel resources with alternative fuels or technologies; "thermal efficiency improvements" refers to the recovery of waste heat or steam produced in any commercial or industrial processes; and "solid waste conversion" refers to the use of waste to produce energy and the utilization of such energy. Eligible technologies may include solar-thermal systems, photovoltaic systems, wind, biomass, landfill gas and waste-recovery systems. Upon receipt of certification from the tax commissioner, such property is exempt from Ohio's sales and use tax. In addition, such property is not considered to be an improvement on the land for purposes of real property taxation or as 'used in business' for purposes of personal property taxation.* Such property is also not considered in the assessment of Ohio's corporate franchise tax. These provisions have been in effect since 1978. Contact the Department of Taxation for more information. The Application for Energy and Solid Waste Energy Conversion and Thermal Efficiency Improvement Facility is found at on the Ohio Department of Taxation [http://dw.ohio.gov/tax/dynamicforms/searchresults.asp website] (form number ECF). *''It should be noted that Ohio's personal property taxes for general business filers have been phased out. See the Department of Taxation [http://tax.ohio.gov/divisions/communications/publications/annual_reports/2008_Annual_Report/property_tax_tangible_personal_property.pdf.pdf fact sheet] on this subject. It should be noted that public utilities are not considered "general business filers" and personal property of public utilities is still taxed. Furthermore, for tax purposes, a business that produces electricity and sells excess electricity to others will be subject to personal property taxes as well. See the Department of Taxation's [http://tax.ohio.gov/divisions/communications/publications/annual_reports/2008_Annual_Report/property_tax_public_utility_property.pdf.pdf fact sheet] for more information. ''
    f.pdf fact sheet] for more information. ''  +
  • '''''As part of Ohio’s Tax Reform, persona
    '''''As part of Ohio’s Tax Reform, personal property tax was phased-out by 2009 and corporate franchise tax was phased-out by 2010 for most taxpayers.''''' Ohio may provide an exemption for certain property from real and personal property taxation*, state sales and use taxes, and the state's corporate franchise tax where applicable. The exemption applies to property used in energy conversion, thermal-efficiency improvements and the conversion of solid waste to energy. Generally, "energy conversion" refers to the replacement of fossil-fuel resources with alternative fuels or technologies; "thermal efficiency improvements" refers to the recovery of waste heat or steam produced in any commercial or industrial processes; and "solid waste conversion" refers to the use of waste to produce energy and the utilization of such energy. Eligible technologies ''may'' include solar-thermal systems, photovoltaic systems, wind, biomass, landfill gas and waste-recovery systems. Upon receipt of certification from the tax commissioner, such property is exempt from Ohio's sales and use tax. In addition, such property is not considered to be an improvement on the land for purposes of real property taxation or as 'used in business' for purposes of personal property taxation.* Such property is also not considered in the assessment of Ohio's corporate franchise tax. These provisions have been in effect since 1978. Contact the Department of Taxation for more information. The Application for Energy and Solid Waste Energy Conversion and Thermal Efficiency Improvement Facility is found at on the Ohio Department of Taxation [http://dw.ohio.gov/tax/dynamicforms/searchresults.asp website] (form number ECF). *''It should be noted that Ohio's personal property taxes for general business filers have been phased out. See the Department of Taxation [http://tax.ohio.gov/divisions/communications/publications/annual_reports/2008_Annual_Report/property_tax_tangible_personal_property.pdf.pdf fact sheet] on this subject. It should be noted that public utilities are not considered "general business filers" and tangible personal property of public utilities is still taxed. Furthermore, for tax purposes, a business that produces electricity and sells excess electricity to others will be subject to personal property taxes as well. See the Department of Taxation's [http://tax.ohio.gov/divisions/communications/publications/annual_reports/2008_Annual_Report/property_tax_public_utility_property.pdf.pdf fact sheet] for more information.''
    df.pdf fact sheet] for more information.''  +
  • '''''Burbank Water and Power (BWP) '''''''
    '''''Burbank Water and Power (BWP) ''''''''''accepted applications for photovoltaic (PV) rebates throughout July 2013. Winners were determined through a lottery on August 12, 2013. ''''''''''Only systems under 30 kW were accepted for this round. ''''''''''See web site above for more information. ''''' Burbank Water and Power (BWP) offers customers either an up-front capacity-based rebate for photovoltaic (PV) systems, or a production-based incentive (PBI) with a maximum payment of $400,000 per year. These incentives decline over time as defined capacity goals are met, eventually declining to zero by the end of 2016. The program may change at any time to address market conditions. Current incentive levels and program details are posted on BWP's [http://www.burbankwaterandpower.com/index.php/incentives-for-all-customers/solar-photovoltaic-power solar web site].<br> <br> The highest rebate, Tier 3, is for schools, non-profits, and affordable housing and is available for only one project per fiscal year. Otherwise, these projects will qualify for the commercial rebate structure. Owners of systems smaller than 30 kW CEC-AC in capacity have the option to receive a one-time up-front payment (EPBB) based on the expected performance determined by BWP's PowerClerk rebate application software. Otherwise, these customers may elect to receive the PBI for five years of monthly payments, based on production. PV systems over 30 kW CEC-AC in size are only eligible to receive the PBI. Incentives for systems over 30 kW, however, have been suspended through August 2013.<br> <br> Beginning January 1, 2010, all PV systems must include a BWP-provided performance meter. PBI customers must pay for the meter and any other meter-related equipment. Also beginning January 1, 2010, customers may use approved leasing as a financing option. In addition, leases less than 20 years are subject to a pro-rated rebate.<br> <br> All customers applying for a BWP solar incentive are required to first conduct an energy-efficiency audit of the building where the solar system would be installed. Newly constructed residential and commercial buildings must achieve at least a 15% reduction in the building’s combined space heating, space cooling and water heating energy compared to Title 24 standards. Lighting is also included in this comparison for commercial buildings. Additionally, each appliance and any equipment provided by the builder must meet Energy Star criteria if this designation is applicable for that appliance or equipment. There is a limit of one solar rebate per customer for the life of the program. Click [http://www.burbankwaterandpower.com/incentives-for-residents/residential-rebates-home-rewards here ]to read about BWP's rebates for residential solar water heaters.
    bates for residential solar water heaters.  +
  • '''''City of North Port loan funds have be
    '''''City of North Port loan funds have been fully committed and are no longer available to residents. Residents of Unincorporated Sarasota County will be put on a waiting list and will be notified when their application will be accepted.''''' Sarasota County offers the Get Energy Smart Retrofit Loan Program to residents of Sarasota County and the City of North Port. In order to qualify for a loan, the total household income of the residents of the home must be less than 140% of median income for Sarasota County. [http://www.ohcd.sarasotagov.com/Get%20Energy%20Smart/Get%20Energy%20Smart%20Income%20Guidelines.pdf Income guidelines] are based on the number of people in the home. A full list of eligibility requirements can be found in the [http://www.ohcd.sarasotagov.com/Get%20Energy%20Smart/guidelines.pdf program guidelines]. Funds can be used for lighting retrofits, Energy Star appliances, insulation, duct repair and sealing, high efficiency air conditioners and heat pumps, solar attic fans, and solar water heaters, and any other items recommended by a home energy auditor. Interested, qualified residents should [http://www.ohcd.sarasotagov.com/Get%20Energy%20Smart/Energy%20Program%20Loan%20Application.pdf apply online]. Once approved, the applicant must obtain three informal bids or estimates from [http://www.scgov.net/retrofit/ParticipatingContractors.asp Participating Contractors], select an auditor, and have an audit performed. Qualified applicants can receive up to a $500 rebate to help with the cost of the audit. Funds are distributed on a first-come, first-served basis.
    buted on a first-come, first-served basis.  +
  • '''''Contact Peoples Gas for information o
    '''''Contact Peoples Gas for information on limited-time bonus incentive offerings. Bonus incentives of $250 - $450 are available for eligible purchases made before May 31, 2013.''''' The Peoples Gas Natural Gas Savings Program offers incentives to encourage customers to make energy-efficient improvements to their homes and apartment buildings. Rebates are available on energy efficient furnaces, boilers, water heaters, controls and insulation. To qualify, gas furnaces, boilers, and water heaters must be installed by professional contractors. Property owners of multifamily units may also participate in this program. A full list of eligible models and insulation and instructions on how to apply for the rebates can be found on the Natural Gas Savings Program web site. Applications must be made no later than 60 days after the equipment purchase date. The Natural Gas Savings Program is funded by customers of Peoples Gas, through a line item on the bill called the Enhanced Efficiency Program. The Program is guided by Peoples Gas, the Citizen's Utility Board, the City of Chicago Department of Environment, the Environmental Law and Policy Center, and the Illinois Attorney General's Office.
    nd the Illinois Attorney General's Office.  +
  • '''''DMME is currently developing criteria
    '''''DMME is currently developing criteria, guidelines, and requirements for loan interest to be charged thereon, the collateralization of loaned<br> funds, the payment of fees and costs incurred by DMME in the making of loans, and such other matters as DMME deems appropriate to ensure the sound conduct of a revolving loan program'''''. The Voluntary Solar Resource Development Fund is a revolving loan fund administered by the Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals and Energy (DMME). The Fund will be fueled primarily by donations from customers of investor-owned electric utilities, other citizens and groups. DMME is will begin issuing loans after July 1, 2012. Eligible projects include the acquisition, installation, and operation of eligible solar equipment at residences, structures operated by nonprofit organizations, or commercial establishments. The Code of Virginia defines the eligible devices as follows: "Photovoltaic device" means a device made in the United States that uses a solar photovoltaic process to generate electricity. "Solar space heating device" means a device made in the United States that, when installed in connection with a structure, uses solar energy for the purpose of heating the interior of the structure, which device moves the sun's heat from one or more collectors to interior areas through the use of a pump and piping or fans and ductwork, and a heat exchanger. "Solar space heating device" does not include a passive solar device. "Solar water heating device" means a device made in the United States that, when installed in connection with a structure, uses solar energy for the purpose of providing hot water for use within the structure.
    ng hot water for use within the structure.  +
  • '''''Due to fund depletion, the program cl
    '''''Due to fund depletion, the program closed to new applications on Friday, April 13, 2012. Purchases made after Thursday, April 12, 2012 will not qualify for a rebate.''''' '''''Note: Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is providing a total of $300 million to U.S. states, U.S. territories and the District of Columbia to establish rebate programs for new energy-efficient appliances that replace existing appliances in homes. Each state and territory has designed its own program. Rebates will be available until the state or territory program's funding is exhausted. Be sure to confirm that rebate funds are still available in your state or territory before making purchasing decisions.''''' Beginning on March 15, 2010, Arkansas's Residential Energy-Efficient Appliance Rebate Program is offering rebates for select Energy Star appliances installed in households in Arkansas. This program is administered by the Arkansas Energy Office. These rebates are available for Energy Star refrigerators, clothes washers, gas condensing water heaters, gas storage water heaters, gas tankless water heaters, and electric heat pump water heaters. These appliances must replace an existing appliance. After purchasing the eligible Energy Star appliances, individuals must apply for the rebate within 30 days. Equipment purchased online is not eligible to receive rebates. Information on the availability of funds can be obtained at the [http://recovery.arkansas.gov/ Arkansas Recovery web site] by calling 1-800-558-2633.
    overy web site] by calling 1-800-558-2633.  +
  • '''''Due to new federal banking and financ
    '''''Due to new federal banking and finance regulations, Coast Electric Power Association can not currently originate loans through this program. A new loan origination format will be available in the near future. Check the program web site above for program status.''''' Coast Electric Power Association (CEPA) offers an Energy Efficiency Finance Program for their residential customers. Mobile homes are not eligible for this loan. The loan can be from $1,000 to $15,000 with a fixed interest rate of two points above the prime rate, with a maximum payback period of 120 months. Loans are available for conservation measures in already existing structures, new construction does not apply. The Loan can cover the installed cost of a complete air-source or geothermal heat pump system, including wiring, duct work, and other associated costs. Certain weatherization measures are also eligible, such as electric water heaters, storm windows and doors, structural insulation, caulking and weather-stripping, and generators. Customers should contact a CEPA Marketing Representative to find out which measures are applicable for their home. For more information, customers can refer to the [http://www.coastepa.com/documents/CAFinanceFactSheet.pdf Comfort Advantage Finance Fact Sheet].
    pdf Comfort Advantage Finance Fact Sheet].  +
  • '''''Federal guidelines have prompted Boul
    '''''Federal guidelines have prompted Boulder County to examine their residential program to ensure it adheres to the new requirements. The ClimateSmart Loan program is on hold for residential loans while County officials review the guidelines. The program is also on hold for commercial projects.''''' Voters in Boulder approved [http://www.bouldercounty.org/newsroom/articlefiles/1304-2008-99%20Resolution%20for%201A%20-%20Clean%20Energy%20Options.pdf Ballot Issue 1A] in November 2008, authorizing Boulder County to issue bonds for the purpose of providing special financing options for renewable energy and energy efficiency improvements to homes in the county. All of the local governments in Boulder County have authorized the city to provide loans to home owners which will then be repaid through a special assessment on their property tax bills. Tax payers can pay two equal half payments due on the last day of February and on June 15th, or the whole payment on April 30th. Either the amount due for the year or the entire loan amount can be paid at these times. After a successful first round of residential funding, Boulder is making plans for the second round of residential funding, and applications are expected to be available in mid-April 2010. Additionally, Boulder launched its first round of commercial funding in January 2010. Property owners can apply for funding for a maximum of 20% of the statutory actual value of the property on which the equipment will be installed, or $50,000 for residential systems and $210,000 for commercial systems, whichever is less. $15,000 is available for income qualified loans, which can be supplemented with open category loans, subject to the $50,000 maximum. The loan can be used to finance a wide variety of efficiency and renewable energy projects on homes in Boulder County. Residential applicants must pay a $75 non-refundable application fee, and obtain written estimates or bids with a "not to exceed" clause prior to applying. Income qualifying loans, for those making up to 115% of area median income, are restricted to primary residences and will receive lower interest rates and annual assessments.
    wer interest rates and annual assessments.  +
  • '''''Fort Pierce Utilities Authority has s
    '''''Fort Pierce Utilities Authority has suspended the Solar Water Heating rebate program until 2013. Contact the utility for more information on these offerings.''''' Fort Pierce Utilities Authority is offering a Solar Water Heating rebate program. Flat rebates of $450 are now available to residential customers toward the installation of new solar water heating units. Systems must be certified by the Florida Solar Energy Center and installed by a licensed Florida contractor to qualify. Rebates are limited to one per household. Rebate applications can be found [http://www.fpua.com/customer_service/index.php here].
    fpua.com/customer_service/index.php here].  +
  • '''''Funding for Block II is fully subscri
    '''''Funding for Block II is fully subscribed. No additional applications are being accepted. Awards were announced in June: see the Energy and Environmental Affairs [http://www.mass.gov/?pageID=eoeeapressrelease&L=3&L0=Home&L1=Energy%2c+Utilities+%26+Clean+Technologies&L2=Renewable+Energy&sid=Eoeea&b=pressrelease&f=100629_ene_commsolar&csid=Eoeea June 29, 2010 Press Release]''''' Commonwealth Solar Stimulus, administered by the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) and funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), provides rebates for the installation of grid-tied photovoltaic (PV) systems at commercial, industrial, institutional and public facilities. Commonwealth Solar Stimulus rebates are available to electricity customers served by Massachusetts investor-owned electric utilities and municipal lighting plant (MLP) utilities. Projects are eligible for rebates for PV projects greater than 10 kilowatts (kW) and less than or equal to 200 kW in capacity. For residential projects and projects 10 kW or smaller, see the [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=MA71F&re=1&ee=1 Commonwealth Solar II] rebate program. Ground mounted systems up to 60 kW are eligible. Rebate amounts are based on the total PV system size per building, regardless of the number of electric meters in use and certain other characteristics of the project. The Commonwealth Solar Stimulus rebate tiers are: * For first 1 to 25 kW: $1.50/watt * For greater than 25 to 100 kW: $1.00/watt * For greater than 100 to 200 kW: $0.50/watt The rebate is available to the system owner, which may or may not be the host customer. Solar renewable-energy credits (SRECs) associated with system generation belong to the system owner and may be sold. MassCEC reserves the right to conduct post-installation inspections of PV projects prior to approval for payments. System installers are responsible for the application process and securing necessary permits. MassCEC has developed an online application system (called PowerClerk) for pre-approved installers. An energy-efficiency audit is generally required. Required documentation generally includes electric utility interconnection approval, an energy-efficiency audit, paid invoices or equivalent, and, if applicable, evidence that automated reporting is functional. All installers must comply with the minimum insurance requirements established by MassCEC. It is recommended, but not required, that installers or their subcontractors obtain or seek to obtain North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners (NABCEP) PV installer certification. There are additional compliance requirements because the funding for this rebate comes from Federal stimulus (ARRA) money. This summary does not capture all of the requirements of the Commonwealth Solar Stimulus program. MassCEC provides program manuals as well as appendices with full program requirements.
    appendices with full program requirements.  +
  • '''''Funding for this program is currently
    '''''Funding for this program is currently exhausted through 2013. The summary below describes incentives as they were previously available. Incentive levels for the next funding round are still unknown. Contact the utility for more information. ''''' City of Gridley is providing rebates of $2.80/W for their customers installing PV systems. Individual rebates are limited to $5,600 per system, and the utility will award a total of $41,700 in rebates per year. Systems must meet all the requirements specified in the program guidelines and interested customers can contact Efficiency Services for more information.
    Efficiency Services for more information.  +
  • '''''IID accepted applications for the 201
    '''''IID accepted applications for the 2013 PV'''''''''' Solutions Program''''' '''''from Jan. 2, 2013 – Jan. 31, 2013. Winners were determined via lottery. The program is now closed for the remainder of 2013, but another funding round is expected in 2014. ''''' Through the PV Solutions Rebate Program, Imperial Irrigation District (IID) provides rebates to its residential and commercial customers who install grid-tied photovoltaic systems. Systems less than 30 kilowatts (kW) can receive an upfront incentive based on the expected performance of the system. For 2013 the expected performance based incentive is $1.95 per watt, but may be reduced based on expected performance. <br> <br> Systems 30 kW or larger will receive a performance based incentive. System owners will receive payments over a 5 year period based on the actual output of their system. The performance based incentive for systems installed in 2013 is $0.18 per kilowatt-hour (kWh). Systems up to 1 megawatt (MW) can participate in the program, but commercial systems over 300 kW and government/non-profit systems over 400 kW will receive a prorated incentive. These payments will be prorated based on the ratio of 300 kW or 400 kW to the size of the site. For example, an 800 kW system owned by a non-profit will receive a payments based on half of the system's output. Incentive payments are capped at $550,000 for the 5-year period ($110,000/year).
    000 for the 5-year period ($110,000/year).  +
  • '''''Illinois Department of Commerce is no
    '''''Illinois Department of Commerce is no longer accepting Program Year 2 applications. Program Year 3 officially begins June 1, 2010. Program materials are available for Program Year 3. This entry includes information about Program Year 3 and for reference, Program Year 2 (below).''''' The Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO) Bureau of Energy and Recycling administers the public sector energy efficiency programs required by the Illinois Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard (EEPS). Standard rebates and grants are available for many lighting, refrigeration, HVAC, and motor efficiency improvements. Custom rebates and grants are available for some measures not covered by the standard rebates. Pre-approval is required for all grants, custom rebates, and some standard rebate applications. The DCEO encourages all applicants to submit pre-approval applications in order to verify project eligibility and reserve funding. The program is available to local, state, and federal governments; public school districts; community colleges; and universities that receive electricity distribution service from Commonwealth Edison (ComEd) or Ameren affiliated utilities (AmerenCILCO, AmerenIP, and AmerenCIPS). This includes customers that purchase energy through an alternative supplier. It should be noted that incentives $50,000 or less are provided in the form of a rebate and incentives of $50,000 or more are provided as grants. '''<u>Program Year 3 (June 1, 2010 to May 31, 2011)</u>''' Standard incentive amounts vary according to equipment type, size, and relative level of energy efficiency. Custom incentives are based on the amount of energy that a given improvement saves annually and are different depending on the type of "public" entity applying. Local government, public schools, and community colleges are eligible for higher incentive amounts: up to $0.12/kilowatt-hour (kWh) or $0.30/kWh for exterior induction, LED lights. Custom measures must have a payback period of between one and seven years. Incentive totals may not exceed 100% of the incremental measure cost or 75% of the project cost. In addition, rebates may not exceed $50,000 and grants will not exceed $300,000. Public universities, state and federal government are eligible for the following incentive amounts: up to $0.09/kilowatt-hour (kWh) or $0.23/kWh for exterior induction, LED lights. Custom measures must have a payback period of between one and seven years. Incentive totals may not exceed 100% of the incremental measure cost or 75% of the project cost. In addition, rebates may not exceed $50,000 and grants will not exceed $300,000. '''NOTE''': There are separate application guidelines and incentive calculation spreadsheets for local government, public school, and community college entities and public universities, state and federal government entities. Projects involving only equipment that qualifies for a standard incentive are not eligible for custom incentives. However, projects that involve a combination of standard measures and measures not eligible for standard incentives are permitted to apply under the custom program. In addition, projects involving standard measures with operating hours substantially greater than the typical operation may apply under the custom program. The following measures are specifically defined as ineligible to receive incentives: * Fuel switching * Projects that replace existing equipment with like equipment * Demand response measures that do not lower overall energy consumption * Measures installed or receiving funding under another utility, DCEO, or Clean Energy Community Foundation incentive program * Custom projects with paybacks longer than the equipment life * Used equipment The program is in its third year (June 1, 2010 to May 31, 2011). The incentive amounts were increased during the third year. Measures installed or costs incurred outside of this time period are not eligible for incentives. Please consult the program website for additional details on program eligibility and application requirements. '''<u>Program Year 2 (June 1, 2009 to May 31, 2010. Funded for Program Year 2 is exhausted.)</u>''' Standard incentive amounts vary according to equipment type, size, and relative level of energy efficiency. Custom incentives are based on the amount of energy that a given improvement saves annually, up to $0.08/kilowatt-hour (kWh). Custom measures must have a payback period of between one and seven years. Incentive totals may not exceed 100% of the incremental measure cost or 75% of the project cost. In addition, rebates may not exceed $50,000 and grants will not exceed $200,000. Over $27 million has supported this incentive during the first two program years ($7.4 million from June 1, 2008 - May 31, 2009, approximately $15 million from June 1, 2009 - May 31, 2010, plus $5 million ARRA stimulus funding from August 2009 to Oct 2009).
    lus funding from August 2009 to Oct 2009).  +
  • '''''Interested customers must contact Mar
    '''''Interested customers must contact Marblehead directly to apply and confirm incentive availability before starting any projects. This incentive may change or be canceled at any time.''''' <br> <br> Marblehead Municipal Light Department offers eligible customers a rebate for solar photovoltaics (PV) installations. The eligibility criteria and incentive were designed to mirror the eligibility and incentives offered under the state's Commonwealth Solar rebate program and changes when the Commonwealth Solar II program changes.* Marblehead Municipal Light Department is not required under law to contribute to the Massachusetts Renewable Energy Trust (Trust), and therefore its customers are not eligible to receive rebates through the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center programs. Marblehead accepts proposals from its customers who are interested in a solar rebate. Program availability is subject to change and/or cancellation without warning. <br> <br> *''The Commonwealth Solar II is administered by the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center.''
    y the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center.''  +
  • '''''NOTE: ''''''''''Application targets f
    '''''NOTE: ''''''''''Application targets for fiscal year 2013 have been met for the GRU Solar PV Rebate Program. The next round of applications are scheduled to open on October 1, 2013 pending approval of the GRU budget by the Gainesville City Commission.''''' Gainesville Regional Utilities (GRU) offers its customers a rebate to install photovoltaic (PV) systems. Systems with solar windows of 80% or more receive a $1.00/watt rebate. The GRU PV rebate is not available for solar windows lower than 79%. The current maximum rebate is $5,000 for residential customers. GRU must perform a pre-inspection of the applicant's site; results of the pre-inspection will determine rebate eligibility. The final rebate level will be determined following verification of the installed system by a GRU solar field inspector. The rebate only applies to locations within the GRU electric service territory. The rebate offer may not exceed the purchase price of the PV system.<br> <br> PV modules must be UL-listed or ETL-listed to qualify for the rebate. All PV systems installed must carry at least a five-year warranty from the manufacturer and installer. The contractor must be currently certified to install PV systems by the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation Construction Industry Licensing Board. Licensed electrical contractors must obtain all necessary permits and perform all electrical interconnections. The customer must carry and maintain $100,000 in liability insurance.<br> <br> All PV systems connected to GRU's electrical grid must comply with current City of Gainesville guidelines governing interconnection with GRU's electric system, and any subsequent revisions to these guidelines. Deed restrictions must not prohibit the installation of a PV system on property per Florida's solar-access law. Customers receiving rebates from GRU must transfer all renewable-energy credits (RECs) and other environmental attributes from power generated by PV systems to GRU.<br> <br> Unless otherwise specified by GRU, PV systems receiving rebates will be dual metered. Under this arrangement, customers will be paid for the electricity they generate that is not used onsite at the time of production.<br> <br> GRU retains the right to deny rebates based on inadequate solar window or poor orientation of the solar array.
    ow or poor orientation of the solar array.  +
  • '''''NOTE: All HERO program funding has be
    '''''NOTE: All HERO program funding has been allocated as of December 6, 2012. Important dates related to the closure of the program have been announced. Please see summary below for more information. ''''' The Home Energy Rebate Option (HERO) - [http://dnr.louisiana.gov/assets/TAD/programs/residential/hero/HERO_Applicant_Guidelines_Original.pdf Existing Homes Program] is offered by the Louisiana Department of Natural Resources (DNR) for residents to receive cash rebates for energy efficient improvements to existing homes that achieve a minimum of 30% energy reduction. The incentive amount is based on two factors, either the Cost of Energy Savings determined by comparing the pre-improved home to the post-improved home over the useful life of the added improvements* or the cost of the energy efficiency improvements. The cash rebate is 20% of the lesser of the two amounts up to a maximum rebate of $2,000. Owners of an existing single-family homes and two-unit residences, are eligible to apply under this program. In order to qualify, residents must make improvements that result in an annual energy savings of at least 30%. Each residence must be metered separately. In addition, certain improvements are assigned point values, which are listed on the program web site. In order to qualify, residents must incorporate any of these improvements with point values that add up to 2 to participate and 6 to receive the maximum rebate incentive. All applications must be submitted prior to the start of any renovation. The homeowner contacts a certified home energy rater listed on the Louisiana DNR site and, pending funding, gets a preliminary rating containing proposed improvements. After the home has been rated, the homeowner must make the improvements within six months. Following a final verification rating by the home rater, the HERO Program will issue a rebate to the homeowner. HERO Program rebates are taxable and Participants will receive a 1099-MISC, Miscellaneous Income Form from the State of Louisiana for the year in which the rebate is received. While the HERO Program is currently ongoing, it is scheduled to sunset over the course of 2013. Please see the list of important dates below for impending deadlines. *December 6, 2012 - last day to submit a preliminary rating that has a (6) month guarantee of funding *December 7, 2012 - preliminary ratings submitted from this date through May 2013 are only guaranteed funding until June 10, 2013 *June 10, 2013 - last day to submit finals under the HERO Program *June 11, 2013 - HERO Program ends ''*This amount is based upon an Energy Efficiency Premium HERS Rating system.'' '' **A homeowner cannot participant in both the Louisiana [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=LA06F&re=0&ee=0 Home Energy Loan Program (HELP)] and the HERO program at the same time, and can only participate one time per property. See guidelines on maximum times of participation.''
    lines on maximum times of participation.''  +
  • '''''NOTE: Applications are due by August
    '''''NOTE: Applications are due by August 19, 2011 and systems must be installed by December 31, 2011.''''' CT Solar Lease allows homeowners to lease a photovoltaic (PV) system, with fixed monthly payments, for a term of 20 years. This program, which takes advantage of federal tax credits for solar energy, is available to owners of one- to four-family homes with a household income not greater than 200% of the area's median income. No down-payment is required.* Homeowners may choose an eligible installer to design and price a PV system. All electricity generated by a leased PV system reduces the homeowner's electric bill. At the end of the 15th year, the homeowner may (1) buy the system at a reduced cost, (2) extend the lease for another five years at a reduced monthly payment, or (3) remove the system -- at the homeowner's expense -- and return the system to the program operator. At the end of the full 20 year term, the homeowner would have options (1) and (3) above. If a participating homeowner decides to sell the home, the lease must be assumed by the new homeowner, or the initial homeowner must continue to abide by the terms of the lease. The homeowner is responsible for paying all repairs and maintenance during the lease, as well as insurance. However, the CT Solar Lease program requires PV installers to warranty labor for the system for five years, and manufacturer warranties are required for the PV modules (20 years) and inverters (five years). The program assumes ownership of the renewable energy credits (RECs) associated with a PV's systems electricity generation. A portion of the value of these RECs will be set aside for the benefit of the homeowner (''Solar Dividends TM'') to be used to cover operation and maintenance expenses associated with the system, including inverter replacement as well as the cost to purchase or return the system. The CCEF, which is investing $38.6 million in this program, aims to support up to 900 PV installations through 2011. CT Solar Leasing, LLC, a non-bank subsidiary of U.S. Bancorp, will finance the purchase and installation of the systems. AFC First Financial Corporation is a partner in the development of CT Solar Lease Program and manages the application and approval processes for residents and handles the lease payments. Gemstone Lease Management, LLC is a partner in the development of the program and manages the day to day operations of CT Solar Leasing, LLC. According to AFC First Financial, the program has installed upwards of 5.4 megawatts via 800 PV installations as of July 2011. See the program web site for more details, to view a list of eligible installers, and to access an application. ''* Depending on the cost and efficiency of the leased system, the cost of electricity generated from the leased solar system might initially exceed the cost of conventional electricity. However, the program provides for an effective fixed price of electricity for up to 20 years and the Connecticut Clean Energy Fund (CCEF) expects that Connecticut homeowners will experience a significant financial benefit as a result.''
    gnificant financial benefit as a result.''  +
  • '''''NOTE: Applications for the 2010 grant
    '''''NOTE: Applications for the 2010 grant cycle are now closed. The next funding cycle will be in Spring 2011.''''' The Seattle/King County Built Green Grant Program provides periodic competitive grants for single-family residential and community development projects to help offset the cost of certifying and designing innovative green projects throughout Seattle and King County. The grants are funded through the Department of Natural Resources and Parks, Water and Land Resource Division and Seattle Public Utilities. To be eligible for this grant, buildings need to achieve either Built Green 4-star or 5-star certification. Built Green is an environmentally-friendly, non-profit, residential building program of the Master Builders Association of King and Snohomish Counties, developed in partnership with King County, Snohomish County, and other agencies in Washington State. Certification under Built Green requires achievements in energy efficiency, indoor air quality, the conservation of natural resources and water quality. Single-family homes which are certified at the 4-Star level can receive a grant of $2,500, or $5,000 if they are certified at the 5-Star level. Single-family developments of 4 or more units can receive $5,000 or $10,000 if they achieve 4-Star or 5-Star certification respectively. Community developments and multi-family developments of 10 or more units can receive $10,000 or $20,000.
    more units can receive $10,000 or $20,000.  +
  • '''''NOTE: As of December 1, 2011, this pr
    '''''NOTE: As of December 1, 2011, this program is no longer accepting applications. It is closed for the remainder of 2011. This program is not scheduled for renewal in 2012. This information is for reference only.''''' The Discretionary Grant Program, administered by the Virgin Islands Energy Office is designed to assist community groups and civic organizations with not-for-profit status, to successfully implement energy efficiency and renewable energy projects. Grants of up to $50,000 are available to help increase the energy efficiency of existing buildings. New construction projects are ineligible for this grant. Grant awardees are required to provide at least 5 percent of the grant amount requested in the form of either in-kind or cash cost-share. Projects to receive funding will be selected based on the following criteria: * Job Creation and/or Retention * Energy Savings * Innovation * Community Benefit/Collaboration * Willingness to share with public through outreach/education * Maintenance Plan * Financial Sources/Accountability The Discretionary Grant Program also provides funding for energy education outreach, solar outdoor lighting, and energy education mini-grants. The grant has been increased with funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, and additional reporting requirements will apply. See the program [http://energy.vi.gov/menubar/DGP%20%20Application%20update%20August.pdf application] for more information. Additional information is available on the Virgin Islands Energy Office web site (look under "grants").
    rgy Office web site (look under "grants").  +
  • '''''NOTE: As of October 2014, Senate Bill
    '''''NOTE: As of October 2014, Senate Bill S0746A extended the compliance period to obtain tax abatement for solar electric generating systems until December 31<sup>st</sup>, 2016. ''''' In August 2008 the State of New York enacted legislation allowing a property tax abatement for photovoltaic (PV) system expenditures made on buildings located in cities with a population of 1 million or more people. This limits the abatement to systems installed within New York City. Eligible buildings include all real property except utility real property. As originally enacted the in-service deadline for eligible systems was December 31, 2012. However, in August 2012 the abatement was extended to systems placed in service through December 31, 2014 at a reduced rate. In October 2014, the Senate Bill S0746 extended the compliance period for systems till 2016.<br> <br> The abatement allows building owners to deduct from their total real property taxes* a portion of the expenditures associated with installing a PV system on an eligible building. Systems placed in service between August 5, 2008 (the effective date) and December 31, 2010 were eligible for an abatement of 8.75% of eligible expenditures annually for four years. Systems placed in service between January 1, 2011 and December 31, 2012 are eligible for an abatement of 5.0% of eligible expenditures annually for 4 years. Systems placed in service between January 1, 2013 and December 31, 2013 are eligible for an abatement of 2.5% of eligible expenditures annually for 4 years. Systems placed in service between January 1<sup>st</sup>, 2014 and December 31, 2016 are eligible for abatement of 5% of eligible expenditures for 4 years. Thus the total property tax benefit can amount to either 35%, 20%, or 10% of the installed system cost depending on when it is built.<br> <br> The maximum abatement during a year is $62,500 or the amount of real property taxes owed during the year. Unused balances may not be carried forward to subsequent years. Eligible expenditures include reasonable expenditures for materials and labor associated with planning, designing, and installing the system. Expenditures incurred using a federal, state, or local grant are not eligible, nor are interest or finance charges. However, the amount of eligible expenditures is not reduced by federal, state or local tax credits, tax abatements, tax exemptions or tax rebates.<br> <br> The abatement program is administered by the Department of Finance in cooperation with the Department of Buildings. Applications for the abatement must be filed by March 15 in order to be eligible for a tax credit during the year the application is submitted. Applications submitted after this deadline can be applied to taxes owed for the following fiscal year. It is important to note that claiming the abatement does not affect whether a building owner can claim New York's [http://www.dsireusa.org/library/includes/incentive2.cfm?Incentive_Code=NY07F&state=NY&CurrentPageID=1&RE=1&EE=1 real property tax exemption] on the value added by solar, wind, and farm-based biogas energy systems.<br> <br> <br> *This incentive is similar to an investment tax credit for renewable energy systems, which are frequently applied to personal or corporate income taxes. It is unique in that the tax benefits are recouped through reduced property taxes on the host building instead of through reduced income taxes.
    g instead of through reduced income taxes.  +
  • '''''NOTE: As of September 2013, this prog
    '''''NOTE: As of September 2013, this program is no longer accepting any new applications. ''''' In August 2010 New Jersey enacted legislation ([http://www.njleg.state.nj.us/2010/Bills/AL10/57_.PDF S.B. 2036]) creating an offshore wind resource requirement within the [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=NJ05R&re=1&ee=1 state renewables portfolio standard (RPS)] and tax incentives for certain businesses engaged in manufacturing wind energy equipment. The term "business" is defined to include corporations subject to the state franchise tax, corporations subject to the state's insurance premiums tax, as well as partnerships, S-corporations, and limited liability corporations. The allowable tax credit is equal to 100% of the qualified capital investment made by a business. The applicant must demonstrate the state's financial support of the facility will yield a net positive benefit for the state. The program is administered by the New Jersey Economic Development Authority (EDA).<br> <br> In order to qualify for the tax credit, a business must make a minimum capital investment of $50 million in a qualifying wind energy facility which employs at least 300 new full-time employees. A tenant occupying a leased area within a qualifying wind energy facility must meet a minimum investment threshold of $17.5 million. The term qualifying wind energy facilities is defined as "any building, complex of buildings, or structural components of buildings, including water access infrastructure, and all machinery and equipment used in the manufacturing, assembly, development or administration of component parts that support the development and operation of a qualified offshore wind project, or other wind energy project* as determined by the authority, and that are located in a wind energy zone." A "wind energy zone" is defined as property within the South Jersey Port District.<br> <br> The offshore wind portion of this tax credit operates as an addition to 2007 legislation creating the Urban Transit Hub Tax Credit. Tax credits for qualifying wind facilities are generally limited to $100 million in aggregate, although the EDA has discretion to allocate tax credits that exceed this cap to "meritorious" projects if sufficient tax credit volume is available. In total, the EDA may not allocate Urban Transit Hub Tax Credits exceeding $1.75 billion. Businesses must apply for a tax credit to the EDA by January 13, 2013 (five years after the effective date of the original Urban Transit Hub Tax Credit Act), and submit documentation for approval of the credit amount by January 13, 2016 (eight years after the original effective date).<br> <br> Businesses may take the tax credit in equal increments over a 10-year period, beginning with the tax period for which the business is first approved as having met the required investment and employment qualifications. In lieu of taking the tax credit, a business may apply to the EDA for a certificate that allows them to transfer the tax credit to another party. Any tax credit sales that take place under this allowance must be for at least 75% of the face value of the credit.<br> <br> <br> ''*While most sections of S.B. 2036 apply to specifically to offshore wind energy, it appears that based on this definition, wind energy manufacturing facilities in general qualify for tax credits.''
    ties in general qualify for tax credits.''  +
  • '''''NOTE: Beginning from October 17, 2014
    '''''NOTE: Beginning from October 17, 2014, NY-Sun loan program has added Solar Thermal as an eligible resource for financing. Financing structure for Solar Thermal equipment are as same as offered for Solar PV systems. Additional financial incentives for Solar Thermal systems can be accessed [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=NY87F&re=0&ee=0 here.]''''' NY-Sun loan program is part of broader [http://dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=NY10F&re=0&ee=0 NY-Sun Initiative] program to accelerate the use of solar PV across the State. In addition to standard block-rebate incentive, NY-Sun Initiative also provides State sponsored low-interest standard and on-bill financing options for eligible customers. The PV installations up to 200 kW should be performed by a participating Solar Electric Installer. List of participating installers is available ''[http://ny-sun.ny.gov/Get-Solar/Find-A-Solar-Electric-Installer.aspx here].'' '''Residential ''' Residential customers can quality up to $13,000, or up to $25,000 with higher cost-effectiveness standards. The repayment periods can be 5, 10, or 15 years and should be within the expected life of the installation. Residential customers can choose between a standard loan or a On-Bill financing loan. These loans are provided by the [http://www.energyfinancesolutions.com/main/homeownersnyphotovoltaic/title/New%20York Energy Finance Solutions (EFS)] on behalf of NYSERDA. ''Residential Smart Energy Loan'' This loan provides a standard loan at interest rate* of 3.99%, or 3.49% if repaid through automatic bank withdrawals. In case of transfer or sale of the property, the customer remains responsible for the outstanding balance of the loan which cannot be assigned. ''Residential On-Bill Recovery Loan'' This loan provides the convenience of repayment through a regular charge on the customer’s utility bill. The payments appear as a separate item on the utility bill and is financed at a current interest rate* of 3.49%. The monthly payments may not exceed the estimated cost savings from the improvements over the loan term. In case of sale of the property, the payments can be transferable. '''Small Business and Not-For-Profit Organizations''' Small business and Not-For-Profit organizations can obtain low interest standard loan up to $100,000, or On-Bill Recovery loans up to $50,000. In addition to PV installation, the funds may also be used to finance certain eligible energy efficiency improvements in the building. More information about financing options for Small business and Not-for-Profit customers can be accessed ''[http://www.nyserda.ny.gov/Governor-Initiatives/Green-Jobs-Green-New-York/Small-Business-and-Not-for-Profits/Small-Business-Financing/Applicants.aspx here.]'' *Interest rates are subject to change
    ' *Interest rates are subject to change  +
  • '''''NOTE: Due to changes in the Rhode Isl
    '''''NOTE: Due to changes in the Rhode Island Personal Income Tax in 2010, the Renewable Energy Tax Credit is not available for systems installed in 2011, unless proposed legislation reinstates the tax credit. Be sure to contact the Rhode Island Energy Office for the latest information on this tax credit.''''' Rhode Island offers a personal tax credit for photovoltaic systems (on-grid and off-grid), solar hot-water systems, active solar-heating systems, wind-energy systems and geothermal-energy systems. The tax credit is equal to 25% of the system cost ''and applies only to residential installations''. The credit is available to the resident or business that pays for the system. Photovoltaic (PV) systems must have a minimum module size of 24 square feet, and must either be connected to the grid or to a battery-storage system. PV systems up to $15,000 are eligible for the full 25% credit. (A resident or business that pays for a PV system that exceeds $15,000 in cost will receive a credit based on a $15,000 system cost.) Solar hot-water systems must have a minimum collector area of 34 square feet and must include a storage tank that holds at least 80 gallons. Solar hot-water systems up to $7,000 are eligible for the full 25% credit. (A resident or business that pays for a solar hot-water system that exceeds $7,000 in cost will receive a credit based on a $7,000 system cost.) Active solar-heating systems must have a minimum collector area of 125 square feet, and must include a system for storing and/or distributing heat to the living area of a house. Active solar-heating systems up to $15,000 are eligible for the full 25% credit. (A resident or business that pays for an active solar-heating system that exceeds $15,000 in cost will receive a credit based on a $15,000 system cost.) Wind-energy systems must have a rotor diameter of at least 44 inches and a minimum factory-rated output of at least 250 watts (W) at 28 miles per hour. Wind-energy systems up to $15,000 are eligible for the full 25% credit. (A resident or business that pays for a wind-energy system that exceeds $15,000 in cost will receive a credit based on a $15,000 system cost.) Geothermal systems must have either a minimum coefficient of performance of 3.4, or an efficiency ratio of 16 or greater. All geothermal systems must have a commissioning sign-off by the manufacturer or distributor of the equipment to verify the proper installation and performance of the system. In addition, all geothermal systems must meet the following standards: * ARI/ASHRAE/ISO-13256-1 for water-to-air geothermal systems * ARI/ASHRAE/ISO-13256-2 for water-to-water geothermal systems * ARI/ASHRAE/ISO-13256 GWHP for groundwater heat pumps * ARI/ASHRAE/ISO-13256 GLHP for closed-loop heat pumps Geothermal systems up to $7,000 are eligible for the full 25% credit. (A resident or business that pays for a geothermal system that exceeds $7,000 in cost will receive a credit based on a $7,000 system cost.) The following systems are ''not'' eligible for the credit: passive solar space-heating systems, passive solar hot-water systems, sunspaces, solar greenhouses, PV and wind systems on boats or recreational vehicles, solar collectors for pools, existing renewable-energy systems, used renewable-energy equipment, and repairs and replacements of existing renewable-energy systems. To apply for the tax credit, taxpayers must first obtain a system approval from the Rhode Island Office of Energy Resources (RI OER), which is to be attached to the income tax filing. The RI OER website provides details on the criteria and application for system approval. Although the statute contains a provision for RI OER to certify contractors in lieu of requiring system certification, contractor certification procedures are not in place at this time.
    procedures are not in place at this time.  +
  • '''''NOTE: Electric Generation Tax expired
    '''''NOTE: Electric Generation Tax expired on October 1, 2013. Electric generation facilities are no longer required to pay generation tax.''''' In 2011, Connecticut created a new tax requiring electric power plants in the state that generate and upload electricity to the regional bulk power grid to pay $2.50 per megawatt hour. Renewable energy facilities, resource recovery facility, and customer-sited facilities are exempt from the tax. The tax and related exemptions are scheduled to sunset October 1, 2013.
    s are scheduled to sunset October 1, 2013.  +
  • '''''NOTE: Funding for this program has ex
    '''''NOTE: Funding for this program has expired, this program is now closed.''''' Klickitat PUD offers a solar PV rebate of $400 per kW-DC of installed capacity, up to a maximum amount of $1,200. This program is part of the Conservation Rate Credit program (CRC) available through the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Grid-tied residential and commercial customers are eligible. Klickitat also offers a [http://dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=WA25F&re=1&ee=1 loan program] that may be used by any installation that qualifies for a rebate.
    installation that qualifies for a rebate.  +
  • '''''NOTE: Funding is no longer available
    '''''NOTE: Funding is no longer available for this loan program.''''' Loans of up to $10,000 are available at 4.9% fixed APR with a repayment period of up to seven years. Homes must be existing residences with electric heat. Participants must have 12 months good payment history with Klickitat and must own or be purchasing the land the home sits on. Loans are secured with a lien. Payments appear on the customer's electric bill as a separate line item.
    r's electric bill as a separate line item.  +
  • '''''NOTE: HB 2893, enacted in May 2013, i
    '''''NOTE: HB 2893, enacted in May 2013, increased the capacity of the Solar Incentive Rate Pilot Program and extended the program through March, 2016, or until program capacity is filled. The most recent enrollment window (April 1, 2014), has closed. Portland General Electric, PacifiCorp, and Idaho Power are not currently accepting applications for the volumetric incentive program. There are currently no plans for an enrollment window in the fall of 2014, but a window will open May 1, 2015 to fill any remaining program capacity. ''''' In June 2009, Oregon established a pilot solar volumetric incentive rate and payment program.* Under this incentive program, systems of up to 500 kilowatts (kW) are paid for the kilowatt-hours (kWh) generated over a 15 year period, at a rate set at the time a system is initially enrolled in the program. The Public Utilities Commission (PUC) established rates and rules in May 2010. This program must be offered by the three investor-owned utilities in Oregon and will be administered by the utilities, though the PUC will periodically re-evaluate rates. The program costs are recoverable in utility rates and utility-owned systems are not allowed to receive the incentive. In May 2013, the program cap was increased from 25 megawatts (MW) to 27.5 MW, and the deadline for the program was extended to March 31, 2016. The original 25 MW aggregate program cap was divided by utility based on 2008 retail sales revenue, with specific sub-allocations for small, medium, and large scale systems. Portland General Electric (PGE) had a total allocation of 14.9 MW, Pacific Power had 9.8 MW, and Idaho Power had 0.4 MW (limited to residential systems under 10 kW). The additional 2.5 MW capacity added in 2013 has been allocated as follows: * PGE: 1,433 kW (860 small/573 medium) * Pacific Power: 1,012 kW (607 small/405 medium) * Idaho Power: 55 kW (all small) Rates differ by system size and geographic zone, and are re-evaluated for every enrollment window. Small- and medium-scale systems participate in a program that is modeled after net metering, where customers are paid for the amount of utility electric load consumption that is offset by on-site solar photovoltaic generation. The incentive paid to the customer is the volumetric incentive rate minus the retail rate. Participating PV systems must be sized no larger than 90 percent of historical energy usage for a home or business, must be grid-connected, metered, and meet all applicable codes and regulations. Systems must be "permanently installed" and must remain in service for the entire useful life. After the 15 year contract ends, systems may continue to be paid for electricity generation, with the rate based on the "resource value." As defined by the legislation, the resource value is determined by the avoided cost of energy and the avoided cost of transmission and distribution. Systems receiving the incentive payment may have reduced eligibility for some other state incentives. Systems may either take the incentive payment or the state tax credit and Energy Trust rebate; systems are not eligible for the incentive payment and the tax credit and rebate. Enrollment in the pilot program will be closed when the 27.5 MW cap is reached, or on March 31, 2016, whichever is earlier. '''Small Systems''' The original program did not specify a minimum size for eligible systems, but HB 2893 specifically refers to systems with a nameplate capacity between five and 100 kW; therefore, all projects receiving incentives in 2014 and later must be greater than 5 kW. While initially program capacity for small and medium system was allocated on a first-come, first-served basis, it is now done by lottery for small systems. Current Volumetric Incentive Rates for Small Systems (5-10 kw) are as follows: <div style="text-align: center; {
    nter; {  +
  • '''''NOTE: HB 733 did not define eligible
    '''''NOTE: HB 733 did not define eligible renewable energy or energy efficiency technologies. The LA Department of Revenue will be releasing more information about this program in the coming months and will likely establish a list of technologies eligible for these incentives. This program will use federal funding under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA).''''' In July 2009, Louisiana enacted HB 733, creating a tax credit to encourage and support the development of energy efficiency and renewable energy industries. This legislation enacted a refundable and transferable tax credit that will be provided to companies for green jobs industries, including energy efficient building, construction and retrofit industries, the renewable energy power industry, manufacturing of sustainable products, and energy efficiency and renewable energy projects. This tax credit applies broadly to projects that create green jobs and and also applies to projects for construction, repair or renovation of state-certified green projects. The tax credit awarded depends on the base investment a company makes. For base investments of greater than $100,000 and less than or equal to $300,000, companies will get a 10% tax credit. For base investments of greater than $300,000 and less than or equal to $1 million, companies will get a 20% tax credit. For base investments of greater than $1 million, companies will get a 25% tax credit. If the base investment is used for the payroll for Louisiana residents or graduates from certain Louisiana schools, then additional tax credits may be awarded. The maximum amount a company can receive in tax credits is $1 million. In total, $5 million per year is availalble on a first-come, first-served basis for a minimum of three years. Funding for this program will come from federal funding sources to support green jobs. Taking this tax credit may reduce a company's ability to take state rebates or other incentives. This tax credit can be taken against either individual or corporate income tax. Credits can be earned once 25% of expenditures have been made. The Louisiana Department of Economic Development will certify projects for this tax credit.
    will certify projects for this tax credit.  +
  • '''''NOTE: In 2010, the Federal Housing Fi
    '''''NOTE: In 2010, the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA), which has authority over mortgage underwriters Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, [http://www.fhfa.gov/Media/PublicAffairs/Pages/FHFA-Statement-on-Certain-Energy-Retrofit-Loan-Programs.aspx directed] these enterprises against purchasing mortgages of homes with a PACE lien due to its senior status above a mortgage. Most residential PACE activity subsided following this directive; however, some residential PACE programs are now operating with loan loss reserve funds, appropriate disclosures, or other protections meant to address FHFA's concerns. Commercial PACE programs were not directly affected by FHFA’s actions, as Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac do not underwrite commercial mortgages. Visit [http://pacenow.org/ PACENow] for more information about PACE financing and a comprehensive list of all PACE programs across the country.''''' Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing effectively allows property owners to borrow money from the local government to pay for energy improvements. The amount borrowed is typically repaid via a special assessment on the property over a period of years. Connecticut has authorized local governments to establish such programs, as described below. (No local governments in Connecticut currently offer residential PACE financing.) In July 2011, Connecticut passed omnibus energy legislation. In section 100, the state authorizes municipalities to create "Sustainable Energy Programs" within their respective jurisdictions (known as PACE). Municipalities that wish to establish Sustainable Energy Programs must first declare the public need for a program, then publish its intention to create a program via public notice and solicit and consider public comment. Once a program is established, the municipality is authorized to enter into a contractual assessment on the property for the amount required to complete the requested energy upgrades. The assessment is considered a lien on the property and the municipality may collect payments in a manner consistent with how the municipality collects property taxes. To finance the programs, municipalities may issue bonds, secure private funding, or state or federal funds (or a combination of these). In June 2012, Connecticut passed the Commercial PACE or "C-PACE," which is specific to non-residential property owners. The Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority is working to administer the [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=CT98F&re=0&ee=0 C-PACE financing program].
    p;re=0&ee=0 C-PACE financing program].  +
  • '''''NOTE: In 2010, the Federal Housing Fi
    '''''NOTE: In 2010, the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA), which has authority over mortgage underwriters Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, [http://www.fhfa.gov/Media/PublicAffairs/Pages/FHFA-Statement-on-Certain-Energy-Retrofit-Loan-Programs.aspx directed] these enterprises against purchasing mortgages of homes with a PACE lien due to its senior status above a mortgage. Most residential PACE activity subsided following this directive; however, some residential PACE programs are now operating with loan loss reserve funds, appropriate disclosures, or other protections meant to address FHFA's concerns. Commercial PACE programs were not directly affected by FHFA’s actions, as Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac do not underwrite commercial mortgages. Visit [http://pacenow.org/ PACENow] for more information about PACE financing and a comprehensive list of all PACE programs across the country.''''' In June 2012, Connecticut passed legislation enabling Commercial Property Assessed Clean Energy financing (C-PACE), targeting commercial, industrial and multifamily property owners. C-PACE is a financial policy tool that allows property owners to finance qualifying energy efficiency and clean energy improvements on their properties through a special assessment on the property tax bill, which is repaid over a period of years (up to 20 years). Connecticut's C-PACE program is “owner-arranged,” meaning the property owner contracts directly with a private capital provider to obtain financing. The special assessment (also called a lien) on the property automatically transfers to the next owner in the event of a sale or transfer of ownership. The lien is senior to a mortgage, although it is non-accelerated, meaning in the event of default, only the payments in arrears would come due. To participate in C-PACE financing, interested property owners must: * Be located in a participating municipality. C-PACE maintains a list of [http://www.c-pace.com/site/page/view/resources#content-participating-municipalities participating municipalities]. Interested property owners should contact CEFIA if their municipality is not on the list of participating municipalities. * Work with an approved energy professional (such as an auditor or contractor) to identify eligible projects. CEFIA will maintain a list of approved contractors. In general, improvements must be permanently affixed to the property and should either lower the building’s energy consumption or produce clean energy. * Apply for financing via CEFIA's C-PACE web site. If approved, CEFIA will place a lien on the property and financing will become available. Property owners repay the financing via the local property tax bills over the course of 20 years. * Obtain written consent of existing mortgage holders. While there is no financing minimum, PACE financing is best suited for capital improvements above $150,000, due to transaction costs. Please see [http://www.cpace.com/assets/pdf/Program_Guidelines.pdf C-PACE Program Guidebook] for more information about the program.
    k] for more information about the program.  +
  • '''''NOTE: In June 2011, the Oregon State
    '''''NOTE: In June 2011, the Oregon State Legislature passed [http://www.leg.state.or.us/11reg/measures/hb3600.dir/hb3672.en HB3672], making significant changes to the Business Energy Tax Credit program. This program is no longer available. This record is for informational purposes only.''''' Oregon's Business Energy Tax Credit (BETC) is for investments in energy conservation, recycling, renewable energy resources, sustainable buildings, and less-polluting transportation fuels. Any Oregon business may qualify, including, but not limited to, manufacturing plants, stores, offices, apartment buildings, farms, and transportation. The tax credit can cover costs directly related to the project, including equipment cost, engineering and design fees, materials, supplies and installation costs. Loan fees and permit costs also may be claimed. However, replacing equipment at the end of its useful life or equipment required to meet codes or other government regulations are not eligible. Maintenance costs are also not eligible. All projects must meet the applicable BETC [http://www.oregon.gov/ENERGY/CONS/BUS/tax/BETC-Renewables.shtml technical requirements] to qualify. Projects that use solar, wind, hydro, geothermal, biomass or fuel cells (renewable fuels only) to produce energy, displace energy, or reclaim energy from waste may qualify for a tax credit. Renewable resource projects must replace at least 10% of the electricity, gas or oil used. The energy can be used on site or sold. Solar arrays that take BETC must be used solely for business purposes, unless being installed by a homebuilder or on a rental dwelling or high performance home. Solar systems that are taking advantage of [http://dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=OR134F&re=1&ee=1 Oregon's Pilot Solar Volumetric Incentive Rates and Payments Program] are not eligible for BETC. The tax credit for facilities using or producing renewable energy resources is capped at $300 million for systems pre-certified from July 1, 2009 to June 30, 2011 and $150 million for systems pre-certified between July 1, 2011 and June 30, 2012. Projects must receive final certification before July 1, 2012, to use the tax credit. Renewable energy equipment manufacturing facilities must receive preliminary certification before January 1, 2014, in order to use the tax credit. The tax credit is also available to homebuilders who install renewable energy systems on the homes they construct. The maximum tax credit for a homebuilder is $9,000 per single-family home, or $12,000 if the system is installed on a certified high-performance home. To be considered a high-performance home, the dwelling must be certified through the Northwest Energy Star Homes Program, and meet additional requirements outlined in the technical requirements. General retrofit projects, in addition to those for lighting, and weatherization projects for rental property may be eligible for the program, as well as new construction projects, including energy efficiency and lighting. Retrofit projects must be 10% more energy efficient than the existing installation; lighting retrofits must be 25% more efficient than existing lighting. For new buildings, all measures must reduce energy use by at least 10% compared to a similar building that meets the minimum requirements of the state energy code. Cogeneration projects may also be eligible. Projects that develop new markets for recycled materials or recycle materials not required by law may be eligible for the tax credit. Projects that reduce employee commuting (or work-related travel) and investments in cleaner-burning fuels may qualify. Different cost caps and percentage caps apply to different technologies. Generally, the maximum allowable credits are as follows: * Renewable energy equipment manufacturing: 50% of certified project costs, distributed over five years (10% per year), up to $20 million; * Renewable energy generation, high efficiency combined heat and power: 50% of certified project costs, distributed over five years (10% per year), up to $10 million; * Wind projects over 10 MW: 50% of certified project costs (though only 5% of total project costs are certified costs), up to $2.5 million*; * All other projects: 35% of certified project costs, distributed over five years (10% in the first and second years, 5% each year thereafter), up to $3.5 million; and * Credit to homebuilder: $9,000 per single-family home, or $12,000 if the system is installed on a certified high-performance home. Under the pass-through option, a project owner may transfer a tax credit to a pass-through partner in return for a lump-sum cash payment (the net present value of the tax credit) upon completion of the project. The pass-through option allows non-profit organizations, schools, governmental agencies, tribes, and other public entities and businesses without tax liability to use the Business Energy Tax Credit by transferring their tax credit for an eligible project to a partner with a tax liability. As of January 1, 2010, the pass-through rate "is determined by taking the total tax credit amount divided by the sum of one plus three times the five year United States Treasury Note minus the average of the net change for the three previous calendar years of the urban Consumer Price Index (CPI) for the west region based on the index published on the first day of the calendar quarter and the first day of the same calendar quarter for the previous three calendar years exponentially raised by 5." Applications and instructions are available on the program web site. The ODOE has published a [http://egov.oregon.gov/ENERGY/CONS/BUS/docs/betcbro.pdf brochure] to explain how the tax credit works. '''History:''' Since the Business Energy Tax Credit was originally created, several pieces of legislation have modified the credit and these caps. In 2001, the Oregon Legislature added sustainable buildings to the list of measures and systems eligible for the tax credit. This addition became effective October 8, 2001, and is retroactive to January 1, 2001. In addition to several requirements set forth by the ODOE, the building must meet established standards set by the U.S. Green Building Council's Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) for Silver Certification. [http://www.leg.state.or.us/07reg/measpdf/hb3200.dir/hb3201.en.pdf HB 3201], enacted in July 2007, increased the tax credit to 50% of the total cost for renewable energy, high efficiency combined heat and power, and renewable energy equipment manufacturing facilities, with a maximum credit of $10 million. The tax credit for all other projects remains at 35% of eligible project costs. The 50% tax credit is taken over five years -- 10% each year. Any unused credit may be carried forward up to eight years. Those with eligible project costs of $20,000 or less may take the tax credit in one year. These changes were retroactive to include projects beginning on or after January 1, 2007. This legislation also created a sunset date of January 1, 2016, though this sunset date has since been modified. In March 2008, [http://www.leg.state.or.us/08ss1/measpdf/hb3600.dir/hb3619.en.pdf HB 3619] increased the maximum credit just for manufacturers of renewable energy equipment to $20 million (50% of a $40 million facility). HB 3619 also requires the Oregon Department of Energy (ODOE) to set standards related to what constitutes a manufacturing facility, as well as the facility’s minimum level of increased employment, financial viability, and the influence that the BETC would have on a manufacturer locating in Oregon. ODOE can apply those standards to certify a lesser amount of costs than applied for, including zero costs. HB 3619 also requires ODOE to consider criteria relating to the state’s general fund before determining the amount of costs eligible for the BETC. In November 2009, the Oregon Department of Energy adopted temporary administrative rules (effective from November 3, 2009, to May 1, 2010) that more stringently define criteria for separate and distinct facilities for the purpose of applying for multiple credits. The new rules also allow the Oregon Department of Energy to revoke certificates and recapture the tax credit if a project does not produce the amount of energy, jobs, or conservation described in the application. Any projects that were not pre-certified by November 3, 2009, were subject to the new rules. In March 2010, HB 3680 was signed by the governor, reducing the maximum credit available to wind facilities that have an installed capacity of more than 10 MW. These facilities are eligible for a tax credit of 50% of certified costs (though only 5% of total costs may be included in certification costs), up to $3.5 million for projects pre-certified between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2010. Systems pre-certified between January 1, 2011 and December 31, 2011, are eligible for a tax credit up to $2.5 million. Systems pre-certified on or after January 1, 2012, are eligible for a tax credit up to $1.5 million. This bill also created a maximum cap on the number of tax credits awarded. The tax credit for facilities using or producing renewable energy resources is capped at $300 million for systems pre-certified from July 1, 2009 to June 30, 2011, and $150 million for systems pre-certified between July 1, 2011 and June 30, 2012. Finally, this bill increased the discretion the Oregon Department of Energy has in issuing tax credits. The changes made by this bill were incorporated into the temporary administrative rules issued May 21, 2010. The temporary rules were effective until permanent rules replaced them on November 23, 2010. These new rules are in effect for all preliminary and final applications received on or after July 1, 2009. ''* These facilities are eligible for a tax credit of 50% of certified costs, up to $3.5 million for projects pre-certified between January 1, 2010, and December 31, 2010. Systems pre-certified between January 1, 2011 and December 31, 2011, are eligible for a tax credit up to $2.5 million. Systems pre-certified on or after January 1, 2012, are eligible for a tax credit up to $1.5 million.''
    ble for a tax credit up to $1.5 million.''  +
  • '''''NOTE: Incentives through this program
    '''''NOTE: Incentives through this program are not yet available. Electric distribution companies have until Nov 15, 2014 to submit tariffs to the Public Utility Commission (PUC). The PUC, in turn, has until March 31, 2015 to approve the tariffs. ''''' In 2014, Act H 7727 created the Renewable Energy Growth (REG) program with the goal to the promote installation of grid connected renewable energy within the load zones of electric distribution companies (EDCs) at a reasonable cost. This tariff-based incentive program is designed to finance the development, construction, and operation of renewable energy distributed generation projects through competitive bidding processes over 5 years to achieve specific megawatt (MW) targets. This program is implemented by the EDCs under supervision and review of the Public Utility Commission (PUC). For period of at least 5 years, the EDCs shall file tariffs with the PUC that are designed to provide multi year performance based incentives to eligible renewable distributed generation projects. Tariffs shall be developed by the EDCs and will be reviewed and approved by the PUC. Proposed tariffs shall include a ceiling price and term lengths that shall be from 15 to 20 years. After being approved by the PUC, the terms under the tariffs shall not be altered in any way that would undermine the reliance of those tariffs. The EDCs shall file the first set of tariffs and solicitation rules with the PUC by November 15, 2014, which the PUC shall review and approve by March 31, 2015. '''Program Goal'''<br> The REG program has target install total of 160 MW of distributed renewable energy during its 5 year term. The first year of the program (2015) has an annual target of 25 MW, 40 MW for second year, 40 MW for third and fourth year, and rest of the 160 MW for the fifth year. There is also an annual target of at least 3 MW for small scale solar projects for first 4 years of the program. '''Bidding Process '''<br> <u>Small-scale and medium-scale solar projects</u> will submit an enrollment application to receive a standard performance based incentive for the period of years in an applicable tariff. The applications shall be selected on a first come, first served basis or by means of commission-approved lottery. <u>Large scale and commercial scale solar projects and all other eligible technologies</u> shall bid a price per kilowatt-hour (kWh) for the entire output of the facility, which does not exceed the ceiling price. The EDC will select projects based on the lowest proposed prices, time of completion of the project, and award performance based incentives to the winning bidders. In order incentivize renewable distributed generation projects, the EDC may include an incentive payment adder to the bid price of any winning bidder that propose a distributed generation project in a desired geographical load area. <div> The REG program shall be administered exclusively through the tariff structure and the EDC is not required to execute a power purchase agreement (PPA) for the procurement of the renewable energy for the program. </div>
    le energy for the program. </div>  +
  • '''''NOTE: Legislation enacted in 2011 and
    '''''NOTE: Legislation enacted in 2011 and 2012 (S.B. 1652, H.B. 3036, and S.B. 3811) has changed several aspects of net metering in Illinois. For customers in competitive classes as of July 1, 2011, the law prescribes a dual metering and bill crediting system which does not meet the definition of net metering as the term is generally defined. Click here for information regarding competitive classes, and [http://www.icc.illinois.gov/ormd/ here] for information regarding competitive classes, and [http://www.icc.illinois.gov/electricity/switchingstatistics.aspx here] to find utility switching statistics. The law also increases the system capacity limit to 2 MW and the aggregate capacity limit to 5%. Additionally, agricultural residues, untreated and unadulterated wood waste, landscape trimmings, and livestock manure are added to the list of eligible resources. More information will be posted here once the ICC develops new rules. ''''' Illinois enacted legislation in August 2007 (S.B. 680) requiring investor-owned utilities in Illinois to begin offering net metering by April 1, 2008. In May 2008, the Illinois Commerce Commission (ICC) adopted final rules for net metering, effective May 15, 2008. While Illinois's investor-owned utilities and alternative retail electricity suppliers must offer net metering, the state's municipal utilities and electric cooperatives are not required to do so. In Illinois, net metering is available to electric customers that generate electricity using solar energy, wind energy, dedicated energy crops, anaerobic digestion of livestock or food processing waste, hydropower, and fuel cells and microturbines powered by renewable fuels. Systems up to 40 kilowatts (kW) in capacity that are intended primarily to offset the customer's own electrical requirements are eligible.* Each investor-owned utility and retail supplier must provide net metering and dual metering until the load of its net-metering customers and dual-metering customers equals 1% of the total peak demand supplied by the utility during the previous year. For residential customers, net metering is "typically" accomplished through use of a single, bi-directional meter. For non-residential customers, net metering is "typically" accomplished through the use of a dual meter. Dual metering is required for non-residential customers with systems greater than 40 kW but not greater than two megawatts (MW). The utility must provide the necessary metering equipment for systems up to 40 kW in capacity, while customers with systems greater than 40 kW but less than 2 MW must pay for the costs of installing necessary metering equipment. (Net metering and dual metering are not available to systems greater than 2 MW.) An electricity provider may choose to allow meter aggregation for community-owned wind, biomass, solar, or methane digesters, or other situations where multiple individual customers are served by the same renewable generating facility (such as an apartment building). S.B. 1652 added a provision that requires all net-metered systems to be installed by a certified contractor. In March 2012, the ICC opened a docket ([http://www.icc.illinois.gov/docket/Documents.aspx?no=12-0213 Case No. 12-0213]) to determine the specific certification requirements <b>Net Excess Generation and Renewable Energy Credits</b> For systems up to 40 kW in capacity, any net excess generation (NEG) during a billing period is carried over as a kilowatt-hour (kWh) credit to the following billing period. At the end of an annualized period, any remaining NEG credits in the customer's account expire. Customers may select an annualized period that ends with last day of either their April or October billing period for this purpose. For customers taking service under a time-of-use (TOU) tariff, any monthly consumption of electricity is calculated according to the terms of the contract or tariff to which the same customer would be assigned to or be eligible for if the customer was not a net-metering customer. When net-metering customers under TOU tariffs are net generators during any discrete TOU period, the net kilowatt-hours (kWh) produced are valued at the same price per kWh as the utility would charge for retail kWh sales during that same time of use period. Credits for NEG may be used to offset other charges assessed by the electricity provider. In addition, all net-metering customers (and dual-metering customers) hold ownership and title to all renewable-energy credits (RECs) and greenhouse-gas credits associated with customer generation. <i>*Illinois allows dual metering for systems greater than 40 kW but not greater than 2 MW, although the customer must pay for the metering equipment, and non-residential customers must pay for "all taxes, fees and utility delivery charges" for the gross amount of electricity delivered by the utility. As an economic incentive, dual metering is generally less favorable to customers than net metering.</i>
    to customers than net metering.</i>  +
  • '''''NOTE: On May, 2014, the Board of Publ
    '''''NOTE: On May, 2014, the Board of Public Utilities (BPU) published a report addressing methods to mitigate SREC price volatility in the market. The report can be accessed [http://www.njcleanenergy.com/files/file/Solar%20Act/Solar%20Act%20letter%20and%20SDV%20report.pdf here].''''' New Jersey’s [http://dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=NJ05R&re=0&ee=0 Renewable Portfolio Standard] (RPS) includes a carve-out for solar, requiring the each electricity Load Serving Entities (LSEs) to provide at least 4.1% of the electricity through in-state solar installations by 2028. This solar carve-out, in addition to other supporting incentives has established NJ as one of the largest and dynamic solar market in the US. Solar projects installed in New Jersey that are registered with the SREC Registration Program are qualified to generate Solar Renewable Energy Certificates (SRECs). SRECs represent the renewable attributes of solar generation, bundled in minimum denominations of one megawatt-hour (MWh) of production. New Jersey’s SREC program provides a means for SRECs to be created and verified, and allows electric suppliers to buy and retire these certificates in order to meet their solar RPS requirements. All electric suppliers must use the SREC program to demonstrate compliance with the RPS. New Jersey’s on-line marketplace for trading SRECs, launched in June 2004, is the first such operation in the world. The price of SRECs is determined primarily by their market availability and the price of the Solar Alternative Compliance Payment (SACP) for the state RPS. The SACP is effectively a ceiling on the value of SRECs because it is the per MWh payment that electricity suppliers must make if they fail to obtain enough SRECs to cover their RPS obligation. Prior to 2008 the SACP was set at $300 per MWh. This was amended in 2007, and an eight-year schedule was established by the BPU for Energy Year (EY) 2009 - 2016. In 2012 S.B. 1925 established a 15-year schedule for EY 2014 - 2028. Past and current SACP levels are as follows: {
    {  +
  • '''''NOTE: Previous Program Opportunity No
    '''''NOTE: Previous Program Opportunity Notice (PON) 2276 has been replaced with PON 2828 with updated incentives. The program is now actively accepting applications until December 31, 2015 or until the funds are fully committed. ''''' The Anaerobic Digester Gas-to-Electricity program is designed to support small-sized electricity generation where the energy generated is used primarily at the electric customer's location (third party ownership is allowed). This program is a part of New York State Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) Customer Sided Tier and is administered by New York State Energy Research and Development (NYSERDA). Applications for funding are being received until December 31, 2015, or until the funds are fully committed. Any project applications received after the fund has been exhausted will be held in a queue for next round of funding. Eligibility Customer eligibility is generally limited to those that that pay the RPS surcharge on their electric bills (i.e., customers of the state's major investor-owned utilities). The electricity generated under the program will be counted towards the Customer-Sited Tier (CST) portion of the state RPS. Potential applicants who are considering building an ADG-to-Electricity project can reach out the program to request free technical assistance for project development. Program Description A total of $57 million has been authorized to fund incentive payments for the entire program until 2015. The current PON 2828 has the budget of $10.2 million for 2014 and $10.2 million for 2015. Maximum incentive payment is limited to $2 million per Anaerobic Digester Gas (ADG) system. The total incentive available under the current PON 2828 includes several elements. Incentives can be calculated through the Incentive Calculation Tool available at NYSERDA website. Capacity based incentives include distinct incentives for the digester and generator components of a system, as well as certain additional system components or capabilities. In summary, the available incentives are as follows (see PON 2828 for further details): * Capacity Incentive: Capacity incentive is provided to offset the capital costs of installing a system. Different amount of capacity incentive is available depending on the design, construction, and type of system. Capacity incentive has two components- fixed base element and a variable element. Fixed base element range from $100,000 to $50,000, and is provided as a standard incentive depending on the system type. Variable capacity incentive ranges from $1,500 to $750 per KWh of power generation capacity. Additional capacity incentives are available for other project enhanced components including Black start capability, Hydrogen sulfide reduction, design to accept food waste and others. * Performance-Based Incentive: $0.025/kilowatt-hour (kWh) up to 10 years of verified electricity production using a 75% capacity factor. Applicant also have the option for applying for additional incentives available for H2S (Hydrogen sulfide) gas reduction processes. Incentives ranging from $0.0023/kWh- $0.004/kWh may be available depending on the type of system used for H2S reduction. * Project Enhancement Incentive: Additional incentives are available for systems designed with additional features such as Black Start Capability, Hydrogen sulfide removal, design to accept food waste, and others. * Interconnection Incentive: This incentive is provided to offset the costs related to Coordinated Electric System Interconnection Review (CESIR) process and implementation of grid connection. CESIR process is required for projects with installed capacity of 50kW to 2MW. Incentive is available to cover 75% of the CESIR costs exceeding $5,000 up to $50,000. NYSERDA counts the environmental attributes associated with energy production by funded systems towards the state RPS target for the life of the system. For further program details, including application materials and information on additional requirements, visit the program web site listed at the top of this page.
    m web site listed at the top of this page.  +
  • '''''NOTE: Since June 20, 2013, the progra
    '''''NOTE: Since June 20, 2013, the program has been managed by the NJ Board of Public Utilities (BPU) as a part of its Clean Energy Program. Applications should be directed to NJ BPU instead of NJ Economic Development Authority (EDA) who was previously was administering the program.''''' Eligibility: The New Jersey Clean Energy Program (NJCEP) offers grants for the installation of combined heat and power (CHP) or fuel cell systems to commercial, industrial, and institutional entities (including non-profits and public entities). In order to qualify for incentives, the applicant must be a contributor to the Societal Benefits Charge (SBC). Equipment must be commercially available, permanently installed, and installed on the customer side of the meter. Expansions of existing facilities may be eligible, though only the incremental expansion will be eligible for the incentive. Systems must have at least a 10-year all inclusive warranty or service contract and must be sized to meet the customer's electrical load (no more than 100% of historical annual consumption or peak demand). Third-party owned systems are eligible and must comply with the 10-year minimum warranty or service contract requirement. Program Description: The incentives amount depends on different size of the system. The grant amounts are as follows: {
    {  +
  • '''''NOTE: Solar Loan program is being upd
    '''''NOTE: Solar Loan program is being updated and''''' '''''not currently offered. ''''' The Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority is offering a pilot loan program, CT Solar Loan, to provide homeowners with 15-year loans for solar PV equipment. The loans are administered through Sungage. Interested residents must apply online to be pre-qualified for the loan. Once the loan is in place, an approved installer files permits, order equipment, and installs the system on behalf of the resident. See the program web site for application materials.
    rogram web site for application materials.  +
  • '''''NOTE: Starting Nov 25, 2013 City of D
    '''''NOTE: Starting Nov 25, 2013 City of Dover PV grants programs have been suspended for revision. ''''' Delaware's municipal utilities provide incentives for solar photovoltaic (PV), solar thermal, wind, geothermal, and fuel cell systems installed by their electric customers. Eligibility is limited to systems that are intended to supply on-site energy needs. The green energy programs offered by the state's municipal utilities occasionally vary from city to city. The Dover Green Energy Incentives program is unique in that the incentive levels and limits are distinctly different from those offered by the other municipal utilities, as well as those offered by Delmarva Power and the Delaware Electric Cooperative. For information on the incentives offered by other utilities, please visit the [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/index.cfm?re=1&ee=1&spv=0&st=0&srp=1&state=DE DSIRE Delaware page]. The incentives offered in Dover are detailed below. '''Solar Thermal (Domestic Hot Water, Radiant Heat)''': $1.00 per annual kWh saved, up to $2,500 for residential systems and $7,500 for non-residential systems '''Wind''': The incentive is $1.25/watt (W) for the first 5 kilwatts (kW) of capacity (0-5 kW), $0.75/W for the next 5 kW (5-10 kW), and $0.35/W for the next 40 kW (10-50 kW) with a maximum incentive for all sectors set at $2,500<br> <br> '''Geothermal Heat Pumps''':$800/ton for the first two tons of and $700/ton for additional capacity, up to $3,000 for residential systems and $10,000 for non-residential and non-profit systems.<br> <br> '''Fuel Cells''': 20% of installed costs, up to $7,500 for residential systems and $10,000 for non-residential and non-profit systems.<br> <br> Systems are subject to a variety of equipment, installation and warranty requirements, including limitations on system orientation and shading for solar energy systems. In addition, to encourage energy conservation, an energy audit requirement has been instituted for both residential and non-residential customers as a condition of eligibility. The Delaware Energy Office processes applications and conducts technical reviews for this program. The program rules do not specify the ownership of renewable energy credits (RECs) associated with system energy production; however, net metering customers in Delaware retain ownership of RECs unless they voluntarily relinquish such ownership. More information about the program is included in the [http://www.dnrec.delaware.gov/energy/services/GreenEnergy/Documents/DEMEC/DEMEC%20Green%20Energy%20Regs%2007142014%20-%20Final.pdf program manual]. '''Background'''<br> Under the 2005 Delaware renewable portfolio standard (RPS) legislation, municipal utilities were allowed to opt out of the RPS schedule if they met certain other requirements. One such requirement was that they contribute to the existing Green Energy Fund for investor-owned utilities or create their own green energy fund supported by an equal surcharge (i.e. $0.000178/kWh). All of Delaware's municipal utilities opted out of the RPS requirements and established their own green energy funds.<br> <br> In 2010 the Delaware RPS was amended by SS 1 for S.B. 119 and the section (26 Del. C. § 363) detailing the obligations of electric cooperatives was slightly revised. While these amendments change several other opt-out requirements, the provision mandating green energy fund contributions in the event of an opt-out remains unchanged.
    the event of an opt-out remains unchanged.  +
  • '''''NOTE: Starting from 02/12/2014, W-9s
    '''''NOTE: Starting from 02/12/2014, W-9s will not be required while filing for rebate under this program. ''''' The Delaware Sustainable Energy Utility, in partnership with the Home Builders Association of Delaware (HBADE), is offering energy efficiency rebates to new homes certified by the National Green Building Standard (NGBS), or Leadership in Environmental and Energy Design (LEED), or that have a Home Energy Rating System (HERS) of 59 or less. The Green for Green program is offered throughout the state; however not all properties qualify based on their location. Specifically, with some exceptions homes built in Level 4 areas as established by the Strategies for State Policy and Spending do not qualify. The program web site contains detailed maps showing these areas.<br> <br> In order to qualify for incentives, homes must be built by program-approved builders. Only homes with a fully signed contract dated on or after February 1, 2013 are eligible for incentives. Home buyers do not submit applications themselves; applications are submitted by the builder on the home buyer's behalf. Non-profit builders are eligible to receive rebates through this program. No individual may apply for a rebate through this program more than once every 36 months. Funding reservations expire six months after the date the application is approved. Rebates are issued when the home goes to settlement and the home has been verified as meeting the certification requirement corresponding to the rebate amount.
    rement corresponding to the rebate amount.  +
  • '''''NOTE: TVA has issued additional 100 M
    '''''NOTE: TVA has issued additional 100 MW of capacity for Renewable Standard Offer (RSO) program for 2015. Applications for new projects will open starting January 2, 2015. ''''' The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) now compliments the small generation Green Power Providers Program by providing incentives for mid-sized renewable energy generators between 50kW and 20MW to enter into long term price contracts. The goal for total production from all participants is 100MW, with no more than 50MW from any one renewable technology. The Renewable Standard Offer program also includes [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=VA61F&re=0&ee=0 Solar Solution Initiative] program that offers additional financial incentives for Solar Photovoltaic (PV) projects. TVA bases the standard offer for customer generators off of a seasonal time-of-day averages chart, which sets base prices for the term of the contract. For projects approved after January 2015, prices increase at a rate of 5% per year beginning in 2016 and may be changed with 90 days’ notice by TVA (no more than 1% per year). For 2015, the average price is expected range between $0.029/kWh during low demand periods to $0.051/kWh during high demand periods. Learn more about pricing [http://www.tva.com/renewablestandardoffer/pricing.htm here]. Generation is recorded monthly through metering equipment installed by TVA and paid for by the participant. All energy output, Renewable Energy Credits (RECs), or other environmental attributes from installations under this program belong to TVA, and all marketing of the program should indicate that TVA (not the power seller) consumes all of the energy from these renewable energy projects. Biomass, Wind, or Photovoltaics can be interconnected through either TVA's transmission system or partners' distribution systems under 10, 15, or 20 year contracts. Biomass should co-fire 50% or more with the fuel consumption content approved by TVA and separately metered. The remainder of the biomass production can be purchased through the TVA's Dispersed Power Production Program. Before approval, the seller must provide TVA with project financing arrangements, interconnection agreements between the seller and either TVA or a Distributor, and TVA metering installation plans at an environmentally acceptable location. The participating power producer is responsible for interconnection, performance assurance, and application costs. TVA, or an approved third party, will also perform an environmental review at the seller’s cost.
    environmental review at the seller’s cost.  +
  • '''''NOTE: The Biopower program is no long
    '''''NOTE: The Biopower program is no longer accepting new applications for FY2014; next round of solicitations will be available on FY2015. The Energy storage program is also under development, and will be available in FY2015.''''' New Jersey's 1999 electric restructuring legislation provides for investments in energy efficiency and renewable energy through a "Societal Benefits Charge" (SBC) collected from all customers of electric public utilities. In March 2001, the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities (BPU) approved funding for renewable-energy programs, including a customer-sited renewables rebate program for homes, businesses, institutions and non-profits. The program is currently managed by Honeywell under supervision of NJ BPU. Currently, incentives are only available for sustainable biomass energy technologies. Energy Storage portion of the program is currently under development, and will be open for solicitations on FY2015. The wind energy portion of the program has been on hold and is not accepting any new applications. The rebates for the photovoltaic (PV) installations are no longer offered through this program. PV systems remain eligible to generate [http://www.dsireusa.org/library/includes/incentive2.cfm?Incentive_Code=NJ07F&state=NJ&CurrentPageID=1&RE=1&EE=1 Solar Renewable Energy Certificates (SRECs)] and may be eligible for specialized programs based in the SREC market. Click [http://njcleanenergy.com/renewable-energy/programs/utility-financing-programs/utility-financing-programs here] for further details on the individual utility programs. '''Program Description''' Sustainable biomass projects are categorized in New Jersey as Class I renewable energy resource under its Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS). Incentives for biomass projects are available under Biopower program offered as part of Renewable Energy Incentive Program (REIP). Financial incentives for the program are offered through competitive solicitations. There is no limit to the system size of the project, however maximum incentive per project is capped at $750,000 or 30% of the project costs, whichever is less. Maximum incentive per entity is capped at $1,125,000- this does not apply to project developers. Any new equipment purchased for enhancing the performance of an existing biomass plant also qualify for the incentive. To encourage rapid completion of projects, additional bonus incentive of 10% is provided to projects that are completed within 12 month after the approval date. Projects that take 12-18 months are eligible for 100% of the incentive. Any projects that require extension beyond the 18 month period only obtain 90% of the total approved incentive. '''Eligibility''' Any sustainable biopower projects that convert biomass into energy that can fuel either fuel cells, micro-turbines, spark ignition engines, and combustion turbines for generating electricity are eligible for the program. Any technology such as anaerobic digestion, gasification, combustion and pyrolysis can be used to convert biomass into energy. Examples of eligible facilities include * Digestion of Sewage Sludge * Landfill Gas Facilities * Combustion of wood wastes to steam turbine * Gasification of wood wastes to reciprocating engine * Gasification or pyrolysis of biosolid wastes to generation equipment Municipal solid waste incinerators, mass incinerators, sludge incinerators and combustion of adulterated wood are not eligible for the program. The applicants must demonstrate that energy crop or waste is available on a sustainable basis and the combustion of biomass must pass NJ’s regulatory emission standard. The New Jersey Clean Energy Program web site provides all application materials, complete funding schedules and information about current incentive levels.
    nformation about current incentive levels.  +
  • '''''NOTE: The Renewable Resource Program
    '''''NOTE: The Renewable Resource Program will accept requests for grant funding for calendar year 2013 beginning January 9, 2013. Applications for residential PV and geothermal systems will not be accepted after 4:30 pm on January 15, 2013. Applications for all other systems will be accepted until this year’s program budget of $260,481 is exhausted. For 2013, the total annual funds available will be allocated as follows: Small Wind Turbines = 2%, Geothermal Systems = 28%, PV Class A = 50%, PV Class B = 20%.''''' The Delaware Electric Cooperative provides incentives for solar photovoltaic (PV), solar thermal, wind, geothermal, and fuel cell systems installed by DEC member-owners. Eligibility is limited to systems that are intended to supply on-site energy needs. Incentives are available to both residential and non-residential member-owners based upon average peak demand over a 12 month period. Class A member-owners are defined as those with an average monthly peak electric demand of 50 kilowatts (kW) or less over the previous twelve months. Class B member-owners are those with an average monthly peak electric demand of greater than 50 kW over the previous twelve months. Maximum incentives are up to $7,500 for Class A and $10,000 for Class B and non-profit systems. Applicants may be required to have an energy audit performed by a Building Performance Institute (BPI) certified contractor prior to grant approval. Energy Star homes may be exempted from this requirement. Both grid-connected and off-grid PV and wind energy systems are eligible for incentives, but systems must serve loads that would otherwise be served by the electric utility. Solar thermal systems used for domestic water heating or in radiant heating applications must reduce or eliminate the need for electric or gas heated water. Renewable energy systems designed and utilized as a third-party ownership or independent power producer are not eligible for grant funding. Incentive levels and limits vary by technology, system size and sector as follows: '''Solar PV''' * Class A and Class B: $.90/W for the first 5 kW of capacity (0-5 kW) and $0.45/W over 5 kW. Maximum incentive of $7,500 for Class A and $10,000 for Class B. * Non-profits: $1.05/W for the first 5 kW of capacity (0-5 kW) and $.52/W over 5 kW (5-10 kW). Maximum incentive of $10,000 for non-profit systems. '''Solar Thermal''' * Domestic Hot Water: 20% of installed costs up to $3,000 for residential systems and $7,500 for non-residential systems. * Radiant Heating: 20% of installed costs up to $5,000 for residential systems and $7,500 for non-residential systems '''Wind''': $1.25/W up to $2,500 '''Fuel Cells''': 20% of installed costs, up to $7,500 for residential systems and $10,000 for non-residential systems '''Geothermal Heat Pumps''': $800/ton for first two tons and $700/ton for additional capacity, up to $5,000 for residential and $10,000 for non-residential systems. Systems are subject to a variety of equipment, installation and warranty requirements, including limitations on system orientation and shading for solar energy systems. The Delaware Energy Office processes applications and conducts technical reviews for this program. The program rules do not specify the ownership of renewable energy credits (RECs) associated with system energy production; however, net metering customers in Delaware retain ownership of RECs unless they voluntarily relinquish such ownership. '''Background''' Under the 2005 Delaware renewable portfolio standard (RPS) legislation, electric cooperatives were allowed to opt out of the RPS schedule if they met certain other requirements. One such requirement was that they contribute to the existing Green Energy Fund for investor-owned utilities or create their own green energy fund supported by an equal surcharge (i.e. $0.000178/kWh). The Delaware Electric Cooperative (DEC), the state's lone cooperative, opted out of the RPS requirements and established its own green energy fund. In 2010 the Delaware RPS was amended by SS 1 for S.B. 119 and the section (26 Del. C. § 363) detailing the obligations of electric cooperatives was slightly revised. While these amendments change several other opt-out requirements, the provision mandating green energy fund contributions in the event of an opt-out remains unchanged.
    the event of an opt-out remains unchanged.  +
  • '''''NOTE: The most recent application per
    '''''NOTE: The most recent application period closed on October 28, 2011. Check the program web site for information regarding future solicitations. '''''<br> The Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity administers the Renewable Energy Business Development Grant Program. The program will support expenses related to the development, retooling, or expansion of renewable energy business and component manufacturers. Eligible costs include the purchase and installation of machinery, equipment and new industrial systems, necessary site improvements, technical or engineering services for process improvements, and the conversion of existing processes. Grant awards are available for between $100,000 and $500,000 and are limited to 50% of project costs. Applications will be accepted until October 28, 2011, subject to funding availability. Renewable-energy technologies eligible for funding support include wind energy, solar-thermal energy, photovoltaics, dedicated crops grown for energy production and organic waste biomass, hydropower that does not involve new construction or significant expansion of hydropower dams, and "other such alternative sources of environmentally preferable energy." Energy from the incineration, burning or heating of waste wood, tires, garbage, general household, institutional and commercial waste, industrial lunchroom or office waste, landscape waste, or construction or demolition debris is not eligible. Projects must be located in Illinois. In addition, because the program is funded by the Renewable Energy Resources Trust Fund, grants are available only to customers of utilities that impose the Renewable Energy Resources and Coal Technology Development Assistance Charge, as defined in 20 ILCS 687/6-5. Participating utilities are listed on the application available at the program website. See the program web site for additional details and requirements.
    e for additional details and requirements.  +
  • '''''NOTE: The most recent solicitation fo
    '''''NOTE: The most recent solicitation for this program closed August 1, 2014. Please check the program website for information on future solicitations.'''''<br> <br> The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) offers an ongoing grant program for the improvement of energy generation, transmission, and distribution facilities in rural communities. This program began in 2000. Eligibility is limited to projects in communities that have average home energy costs at least 275% above the national average. Individuals, non-profits, commercial entities, state and local governments (including any agency or instrumentality thereof), and tribal governments are eligible for this grant. Individuals must work on a project that will benefit the community in order to qualify. Under the most recent solicitation for projects, a total of $7 million was available for qualifying projects. Under this solicitation grants ranging from $50,000 to $3 million were available for a variety of activities, including: * Electric generation, transmission, and distribution facilities; * Natural gas or petroleum storage or distribution facilities; * Renewable energy facilities used for on-grid or off-grid electric power generation, water or space heating, or process heating and power; * Backup up or emergency power generation or energy storage equipment; and * Weatherization of residential and community property, or other energy efficiency or conservation programs. This grant program is not limited to renewable energy or energy conservation and efficiency measures, but these measures are eligible for this grant program.
    sures are eligible for this grant program.  +
  • '''''NOTE: The program is currently accept
    '''''NOTE: The program is currently accepting Request for Proposals (RFP) for Sustainable Energy Financing Projects. The applications are due by January 29, 2015. ''''' The West Penn Power Sustainable Energy Fund (WPPSEF) promotes the use of renewable energy and clean energy among commercial, industrial, institutional and residential customers in the West Penn market region. Eligible technologies include solar, wind, low-impact hydro, sustainable biomass such as closed-loop biomass and biomass gasification, and innovative natural gas technologies as well as energy efficiency. Clean energy refers to advanced technologies, including landfill gas and fuel cells, which use fossil fuels but have significantly lower emissions and waste than current commercialized technologies and fuels derived from waste. The WPPSEF accepts proposals for financing year round. The projects should be aligned with WPPSEF's mission and should benefit the West Penn Power ratepayers. Funding for eligible projects may include commercial loans, equity investment, subordinated debt and royalty financing. Commercial loans are available to manufacturers, distributors, retailers and service companies involved in renewable and advanced clean energy technologies, as well as energy efficiency and conservation products and services to end-user companies and community-based organizations. WPPSEF intends to initiate loan programs in conjunction with other agencies and intermediaries to ensure an adequate flow of financing proposals for consideration.<br> <br> WPPSEF will seek out loan proposals that may not be currently bankable but are acceptable credit risks. For small business lending, the ability to repay a business loan is based primarily on operating cash flow. Also, commercial lending is based on the management experience, ability and character of the management team. WPPSEF will offer term loans to finance energy-efficient equipment, construction, and provide working capital financing as part of a larger request. WPPSEF would charge a below market rate of interest, and secure the loans with available collateral. Further information on funding opportunities can be found on the program web site listed at the top of this page.
    m web site listed at the top of this page.  +
  • '''''NOTE: The program is currently accept
    '''''NOTE: The program is currently accepting applications for 2% interest loans and leases for municipal and not-for-profit entities located in Pennsylvania for energy efficiency and renewable energy projects. The applications are due on January 29<sup>th</sup>, 2015.''''' The Sustainable Energy Fund (SEF) promotes and invests in energy efficiency and renewable energy projects, and energy education initiatives. Financial incentives are offered as loans to promote clean energy technologies and for projects where energy savings are measurable. Eligible clean technology applications include energy efficiency, renewable energy, green building, and clean transportation. Financing terms are customized to the unique requirements of individual projects.The SEF has also developed Energypath, a comprehensive resource intended to assist Pennsylvanians in locating contractors, grants, loans, equipment manufacturers, rebates and technical assistance. The SEF was founded in November 1999 as a result of the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission electric utility restructuring proceedings. The SEF was a key component of the joint settlement with PPL, Inc. (now PPL Electric Utilities Corporation) and the PUC. The fund has collected slightly more than $25 million since opening through a rate surcharge on PPL ratepayers. The surcharge expired and was not renewed at the end of 2006. See DSIRE's summary of Pennsylvania's Public Benefits Funds for more information.
    ublic Benefits Funds for more information.  +
  • '''''NOTE: The program is currently open f
    '''''NOTE: The program is currently open for solicitations; applications are due by 12pm, December 19, 2014. ''''' Game Changer Competitive Grant Program is designed to support innovative renewable energy systems and strategies that result in additional renewable energy capacity installed in the State of Maryland. Eligibility Applicants much show that the project can be completed by December 1, 2015. All of the projects should be physically located in Maryland. Program Description Total of $1 million is available for the program, with typical awards ranging from $50,000 to $250,000. The grant is limited to 30% of the project costs. Awards are intended to support cutting edge renewable technology projects that are “game changing” and are in their early stages of commercialization. Funding is not limited to renewable energy systems but also towards innovative project design ideas targeted towards increasing renewable energy systems, financing ideas, and overcoming barriers for renewable energy deployment. Potential projects may include, but are not limited to: * Hybrid solar photovoltaic/ thermal energy systems that cool the PV system while generating hot water * Solar thermal heating and absorption cooling systems * Low-maintenance solar photovoltaic array tracking systems * Renewable energy generation and storage systems that could be aggregated for efficient transactions with independent operating systems for ancillary services * Renewable energy generation and storage systems that could be aggregated for efficient transactions with independent operating systems for ancillary services * District energy geothermal heating and cooling systems * Biofueled distributed generation and/or combined heat and power systems * Cost-competitive fuel cells that can add backup, peak-shaving and/or baseload * Crowd funding platforms for renewable projects * Innovative employer electric vehicle programs * project to expand access to financing for renewable energy systems to underserved populations * Projects that lower barriers to entry to new renewable energy financing partners in Maryland
    able energy financing partners in Maryland  +
  • '''''NOTE: The third enrollment period for
    '''''NOTE: The third enrollment period for standard contracts for 2014 closed on November 7.''''' Rhode Island enacted legislation (H.B. 6104) in June 2011 establishing a feed-in tariff for new distributed renewable energy generators up to three megawatts (MW) in capacity. The law requires electric distribution companies to enter into standard contracts for an aggregate capacity of at least 40 MW by the end of 2014. Standard contracts include a fixed payment rate and a 15-year term, and generally vary by generator capacity and type. Eligible renewables include solar energy, wind energy, ocean-thermal energy, geothermal energy, small hydropower, biomass facilities that maintain compliance with current air permits,* and fuel cells using renewable resources. Separate classes have been established for “large” generators and “small” generators. Small generators include solar energy systems between 50 kilowatts (kW) and 500 kW, and wind energy systems between 50 kW and 1.5 MW. The Distributed Generation Standard Contract Board will determine capacity limits for other “small” systems, but limits may not exceed 1 MW. (The Board is authorized to modify this program in several ways, as specified in the authorizing legislation.) Payment rates vary by system size and type. The contracting period is spread over four years. The following annual minimum targets for standard contracts have been established: * By December 30, 2011: 5 MW of aggregate capacity * By December 30, 2012: 20 MW of aggregate capacity * By December 30, 2013: 30 MW of aggregate capacity * By December 30, 2014: 40 MW of aggregate capacity The Board must set ceiling prices by October 15 for the following calendar year. Each electric distribution company must conduct one standard contract enrollment period in 2011 and at least three enrollment periods in subsequent program years. Each enrollment period will be open for two weeks. Eligible small and large projects will be assessed separately, and projects from each class will be awarded standard contracts based on the lowest proposed prices received. Eligible systems that are net-metered may apply to sell excess output.<br> ''* Waste-to-energy combustion systems are explicitly excluded.''
    bustion systems are explicitly excluded.''  +
  • '''''NOTE: The third funding cycle closed
    '''''NOTE: The third funding cycle closed December 31, 2012. The current funding cycle runs from February 1, 2013 to June 30, 2013. There is $4,823,507 available for this funding cycle.<br> ''''' With funding from Puerto Rico's Green Energy Fund, Tier I rebates are available for photovoltaic (PV) and wind systems up to and including 100 kW in capacity on a first-come, first-served basis. Projects are eligible for a rebate up to 40% of installed costs, as long as the calculated dollar per watt installed cost is less than the Reference Cost. If project costs exceed the Reference Cost, the incentive will be calculated by using the Reference Cost. Note, higher Reference Costs are allowed in the Special Vieques-Culebra Economic Development Zone. The standard Reference Costs are: * Photovoltaic (PV) and small wind turbines less than or equal to 15 kilowatts (kW): $5.50/Watt (W) * Photovoltaic (PV) and small wind turbines greater than 15 kW and less than or equal to 100 kW: $5.00/W For this funding cycle, there is $2,000,000 available systems 15 kW in capacity or less and $2,823,507 for systems greater than 15 kW but smaller than 100 kW. Applications are completed online. There is a one-time application fee of $250 for systems up to and including 15 kW and $1000 for systems greater than 15 kW. Approved projects must then execute the Reservation Agreement and pay the Reservation Guarantee or provide performance bond of $1000 for systems up to and including 15 kW and 1% of the installed cost for systems greater than 15 kW. Systems should have approved interconnection permits from the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA). Once the system is installed, subsequent documentation is required to receive the incentive payment. Additional requirements and application steps apply; refer to the Green Energy Fund regulations and the most recent version of the Tier I Reference Guide for additional details, both found on the program web site.
    tails, both found on the program web site.  +
  • '''''NOTE: There is one application period
    '''''NOTE: There is one application period per quarter. Applications must be submitted by the fifth day of each quarter (July 5, October 5, January 5, and April 5). <br> ''''' With funding from Puerto Rico's Green Energy Fund, Tier II competitive grants are available for photovoltaic (PV) and wind systems over 100 kilowatts (kW) and up to and including one megawatt (MW). Projects are eligible for up to 50% of installed project costs, although because this is a competitive grant, projects that request less are more likely to receive funding. The Reference Costs used for calculating the maximum incentive amount are:* * Solar Photovoltaic (PV): $6.00/Watt (W) * Wind turbines: $6.00/Watt (W) The maximum incentive is determined by multiplying 50% by the corresponding Reference Cost and system capacity. There is a one-time application fee of $2,000 for systems up to and including 300 kW and $4,000 for systems greater than 300 kW. Awarded projects must execute the Reservation Agreement and pay the Reservation Guarantee or provide a performance bond of 1% of the total installed cost. Once the system is installed, subsequent documentation and a site visit is required to receive the incentive payment. Projects will be evaluated on a scoring system including but not limited to the following criteria: # Incentive amount requested # Cost-effectiveness # Project development experience and local experience # Total project cost per system # Project benefits including the expected production over the lifespan of the system; amount of avoided greenhouse gas emissions, avoided waste water, avoided solid waste generated and avoided water usage; green jobs created and/or economic development benefits # Project location and siting, including potential interconnection issues, possible permits, land access or ownership, and availability of green energy resources # Project finances, including the ability to provide expected development costs through self-funding or third-party financing. All awarded projects must carry sufficient insurance per the regulations and must install utility grade performance meters. Additional requirements and application steps apply; refer to the Green Energy Fund regulations and the most recent Tier II Reference Guide for additional details, both found on the program web site. ''*Higher Reference Costs are allowed in the Special Vieques-Culebra Economic Development Zone.''<br>
    bra Economic Development Zone.''<br>  +
  • '''''NOTE: This low-interest loan program
    '''''NOTE: This low-interest loan program is separate from the Small-Scale Energy Loan Program offered by the Oregon Department of Energy. This loan program is offered by a private bank, Umpqua Bank, for customers working with Energy Trust and their trade ally contractors.''''' Energy Trust of Oregon and Umpqua Bank have partnered to offer this loan to homeowners and small businesses for renewable energy and energy efficiency investments. These loans have no loan fees, no closing costs, and offer preferred rates to homeowners and small businesses interested in certain renewable energy and energy efficiency projects. To qualify for a loan, an individual or business must be a customer of PGE, Pacific Power, NW Natural or Cascade Natural Gas. There are several different loan options that carry different interest rates and terms. Homeowners are eligible for two types of loans, the Home Equity Loan and the Unsecured Home Improvement Loan. The Home Equity Loan is for $5,000 to $100,000, carries a fixed interest rate, and a term of up to 15 years. The Unsecured Home Improvement Loan is for $1,000 to $50,000, carries a fixed interest rate, and has a term of up to 5 years. Small businesses and owners of multifamily residential property are eligible for two types of loans, the Commercial Real Estate Improvement Loan and the Business Term Loan. The Commercial Real Estate Improvement Loan is for $5,000 to $250,000, has a variable interest rate, and carries a term of up to 15 years. The Business Term Loan is for $5,000 to $250,000, has a fixed interest rate, and carries a term of up to 7 years. These loans can be taken for efficient heating and cooling systems, water heating systems, insulation, windows, solar energy systems, air and duct sealing, lighting, appliances, and wind energy systems. Eligible technologies vary by customer type. Several Energy Trust incentives are also available for projects that qualify for these loans.
    for projects that qualify for these loans.  +
  • '''''NOTE: This model ordinance was design
    '''''NOTE: This model ordinance was designed to provide guidance to local governments that wish to develop their own siting rules for renewable energy projects. While it was developed by the Oregon Department of Energy, the model itself has no legal or regulatory authority.''''' The Oregon Department of Energy issued guidance to local governments to address wind, solar, geothermal, biomass, and co-generation project planning needs at the city and county level in July 2005. The [http://www.oregon.gov/ENERGY/SITING/docs/ModelEnergyOrdinance.pdf Model Ordinance for Energy Projects] describes energy projects and siting issues and includes model ordinance language and commentary. Energy projects below certain thresholds are not regulated by the Oregon Energy Facility Siting Council, so the model ordinance can serve as a basis for local regulation of these energy projects. The model language provides a conceptual framework that local governments can adapt to suit local circumstances and to address local energy resources. The model ordinance not only includes general standards for all energy projects, but also details specific standards for different technologies. Specific standards for wind address visual impact, wildlife resources, public safety, and setbacks. The model ordinance is intended to apply to commercial wind projects; residential or agricultural projects under 50 kilowatts (kW) in size are exempt. Specific standards for solar address acreage, ground leveling, wildlife resources, misdirection of solar radiation, public safety, airport proximity, and cleaning chemicals and solvents. The model ordinance is intended to apply to large-scale solar electric projects that generate electricity for structures located off-site. It should be noted that the specific setback and clearance distances in the model ordinance are meant to be suggestions only; they illustrate the concept, but are not formal recommendations or standards. The model ordinance also includes guidance on electric power transmission and distribution lines, natural gas and petroleum pipelines, and biofuel production plants.
    pipelines, and biofuel production plants.  +
  • '''''NOTE: This program has been suspended
    '''''NOTE: This program has been suspended for the 2014 calendar year.''''' Gainesville Regional Utilities (GRU), a municipal utility owned by the City of Gainesville, offers a solar feed-in tariff (FIT) for solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. Modeled on Germany's FIT, GRU purchases energy from qualified PV systems via a standard offer contract at predetermined rates for a period of 20 years, plus the remaining balance of the calendar year in which the contract is executed. Both residential and commercial generators are eligible. Commercial generators can either enter into a FIT agreement or net meter. Residential customers with PV systems less than 10 kilowatts (kW) have the option to enter into a FIT agreement and sell 100% of their electricity to GRU, or to net meter and only send the excess electricity to GRU under the terms established for that program. For those residential customers who choose to net meter, GRU offers a [http://www.dsireusa.org/library/includes/incentive2.cfm?Incentive_Code=FL49F&state=FL&CurrentPageID=1&RE=1&EE=1 rebate] to those who qualify. Any system that has previously received a solar PV rebate, entered into a net metering agreement or been financed with a Low Interest Energy Efficiency Loan from GRU is not eligible.<br> <br> For contracts executed in 2013, the fixed rate for the life of the contract are $0.21/kWh, $0.18/kWh or $0.15/kWh (depending on size and application). There are separate rates for rooftop- or pavement-mounted systems or ground-mounted systems. A total capacity of 2.53 MW is available for 2013 contracts, of which 200 kW is reserved for residential solar projects. For contracts executed in 2013, the rates are as follows: * All systems 10 kW or less: $0.21/kWh * Building- or pavement-mounted systems between 10 and 300 kW: $0.18/kWh * Ground-mounted systems between 10 and 25 kW: $0.18/kWh * Ground-mounted systems between 25 and 1,000 kW: $0.15/kWh If the amount of capacity requested during current application period exceeds the amount of available capacity, a third party will select projects by a random drawing. If the full capacity is not requested during the specified application period, then applications will be accepted until capacity is met. All renewable energy credits (RECs) associated with customer generation belong to the utility. Application information and required documentation can be found on the [http://www.gru.com/OurCommunity/Environment/GreenEnergy/solar.jsp GRU solar feed-in-tariff website]. ''*For contracts executed in 2012, the fixed rate for the life of the contract started at $0.24/kWh, $0.22/kWh or $0.19/kWh (depending on size and application) and decreased over time. ''
    d application) and decreased over time. ''  +
  • '''''NOTE: This program is accepting low i
    '''''NOTE: This program is accepting low income residential voucher applications only from December 27, 2012 until January 17, 2013. After this time period the standard residential voucher applications will become available.''''' The Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) and Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources (DOER) are currently offering rebate vouchers through the Commonwealth Woodstove Change-Out Pilot Program. This program assists eligible Massachusetts residents with the cost of replacing non-EPA-certified wood-, wood-pellet-, or coal-burning stoves with high efficiency, low emissions wood stoves or fireplace inserts, or wood-pellet stoves or fireplace inserts. New stoves must be professionally installed and the installation must be coordinated and certified by the retailer. Old stoves must be permanently removed from service and rendered unusable. The retailer is charged with the coordination of stove disposal and recycling. All applicable federal, state and local building codes and regulations, safety standards and certifications must be adhered to. Eligible replacement stoves or inserts must meet the technical requirements listed below: *Catalytic Converter: 2.5 grams per hour of particulate matter (g/hr PM) *Non Catalytic Converter: 4.5 g/hr PM and minimum 70% efficiency Low income residents who qualify for the program are eligible for a flat $2,000 rebate, and standard residential customers who qualify for the program are eligible for a flat $1,000 rebate. Rebate vouchers will be available until program funding has been exhausted. In order to be eligible for a rebate voucher, the property owner must not have received a Commonwealth Woodstove Change-Out Pilot Program Voucher in the last year, the stove must serve a year-round residence and the project site electric bill must contribute to MassCEC’s [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=MA07R&re=0&ee=0 Renewable Energy Trust Fund]. Rebate vouchers must be approved by MassCEC prior to being redeemed at retail locations. Applications must be submitted according to MassCEC format guidelines. See the program website for details and for a complete application package.
    ls and for a complete application package.  +
  • '''''NOTE: This program is currently being
    '''''NOTE: This program is currently being revised and will be changed in January 2011.''''' Orcas Power and Light (OPALCO), an electric cooperative serving Washington’s San Juan Islands, provides a production-based incentive for residential and commercial members who generate energy from wind and micro-hydroelectric sources. To receive an incentive, members must sign an Agreement for Interconnection granting OPALCO rights to the system’s Green Tags (renewable energy certificates). For wind and micro-hydroelectric systems, the member receives $1.50 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) for half of the estimated first-year production. At the end of the year, a "true up" is paid based on the actual generation as determined by an OPALCO meter minus the initial estimate. The total incentive may not exceed $4,500. For 2010, the overall renewable energy program budget is $25,000. Orcas Power and Light also offers a [http://www.dsireusa.org/library/includes/incentive2.cfm?Incentive_Code=WA06F&state=WA&CurrentPageID=1 rebate] for solar photovoltaic systems.
    =1 rebate] for solar photovoltaic systems.  +
  • '''''NOTE: This program started accepting
    '''''NOTE: This program started accepting applications for the Fiscal Year 2014-2015 on October 06, 2014. Applications will be accepted until April 15th 2015, or until the funds are exhausted.''''' Established in July 2004, the PA Small Business Advantage Grant Program provides matching funds to for-profit businesses with a maximum of 100 full-time employees for improvements in energy efficiency and pollution prevention. The business must also be the primary source of employment for at least one full-time employee. The Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) administers the grants, providing up to $9,500 for proposed projects. Under the most recent solicitation, projects must demonstrate annual savings of at least 25% in energy consumption or pollution output plus $500 in annual monetary savings as a direct result of the proposed project. A recipient of the grant must submit a follow-up report to the DEP twelve months after the project completion date, detailing the environmental benefits and the financial costs and benefits as a result of the project. Prior to submitting an application for the 2012 program, eligible businesses must first (1) obtain a Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Vendor Registration Number; and (2) provide a completed checklist and a W-9 with the application. Franchises are not eligible for funding. Projects that receive energy efficiency incentives from a utility are not eligible for additional funding through the Small Business Advantage Grant Program. Residential rental units and dwellings are not eligible for awards, nor are outdoor wood burners, wood-fired boilers, photovoltaics (PV), solar hot water, room air-conditioners, vending machines, and some types of building envelope measures. The measures identified above as eligible equipment are based on examples provided in program documents and lists of awards made for prior solicitations. The program provided more than $564,000 in grants for 90 projects under the 2010 solicitation. Further information on eligible technologies and the application process are provided in the [https://mail-attachment.googleusercontent.com/attachment/u/0/?ui=2&ik=2897c86624&view=att&th=14a06643c32af6f5&attid=0.1&disp=inline&safe=1&zw&saduie=AG9B_P9F3-VqzVA6Gcq8EpXiP52C&sadet=1417452168399&sads=fuXWhYmbxF3JxOaV74CjeKBGN1k&sadssc=1 program document].
    4CjeKBGN1k&sadssc=1 program document].  +
  • '''''NOTE:''''' '''''It is important to no
    '''''NOTE:''''' '''''It is important to note that some applicants are only eligible to apply under some aspects of the program. Political subdivisions are only permitted to apply for loans or grants for Clean Energy Projects. Businesses and non-profits may apply for loans for Alternative Energy Production Projects and Clean Energy Projects, but may only apply for grants for Alternative Energy Production Projects and for site preparation for an alternative energy system as a Clean Energy Project.''''' In July 2008, Pennsylvania enacted a broad $650 million alternative energy bill designed to provide support for a variety of renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies. Included in this legislation was a provision authorizing the creation of a grant and loan program for alternative energy and clean energy production projects. The program is jointly administered by the Department of Community and Economic Development (DCED) and the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), under the direction of Commonwealth Finance Authority (CFA). The most recent Program Guidelines were issued in October 2013 available [http://www.newpa.com/sites/default/files/uploads/AlternativeAndCleanEnergy_Guidelines_2013-2.pdf here]. Incentives are available to businesses (including non-profits), economic development organizations, and political subdivisions (e.g., local governments, schools, etc.). The program will offer support for alternative energy and clean energy projects in the form of loans, grants and loan guarantees (i.e., grants to be used in the event of a financing default). Under this program, alternative energy production projects and clean energy production projects are governed by distinct sets of definitions and rules. Eligible activities for each type of project are described briefly below (see program rules for more detailed descriptions).<br> <br> '''Clean Energy Projects''' * Construction or renovation of a High Performance Building. * Site preparation of a business park consisting exclusively of certified High Performance Buildings. * Installation of equipment to facilitate or improve energy conservation or energy efficiency (including but not limited to heating, lighting, and cooling equipment). Equipment must be ENERGY STAR rated if applicable. * Installation of an alternative energy system which produces energy from sources defined under the state[http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=PA06R&re=1&ee=1 Alternative Energy Portfolio Standard (AEPS)], including wind, geothermal, biomass, waste energy, hydroelectric, fuel cells, biologically derived methane gas, fuel cells, and biomass; but '''not including solar energy'''.* * Replacement or enhancement of an existing energy system that utilizes nonrenewable energy with an energy system that utilizes alternative energy (as described above). * Modification of the contract terms of an energy service project by a political subdivision pursuant to a new energy savings contract (ESCO) with a qualified provider under the Guaranteed Energy Savings Act (GESA) of 1996. '''Alternative Energy Production Projects (construction or development of):''' * An alternative energy project which produces energy from sources defined under the state [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=PA06R&re=1&ee=1 Alternative Energy Portfolio Standard (AEPS)], including wind, geothermal, biomass, waste energy, hydroelectric, fuel cells, biologically derived methane gas, fuel cells, and biomass; but '''not including solar energy'''.* * A facility that manufactures or produces alternative fuels * A facility that manufactures or produces products, including component parts that provide alternative energy (as defined above), improve energy efficiency, or conserve energy * An alternative energy or alternative fuel R&D facility * A project for the development or enhancement of rail transportation systems that deliver alternative fuels or high efficiency locomotives. * Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) and Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) fueling stations. Both types of project allow eligible costs associated with the preparation of plans, specifications, studies, and surveys, necessary or incidental to facilitating or developing an eligible project, and costs (up to 2%) associated with administering a grant. The individual support mechanisms are described in more detail below. For all types of support, there is a general requirement that applicants provide matching funds equivalent to the funding offered under the program (i.e., incentives generally limited to 50% of costs). '''Loans''' Loans are available at interest rate caculated 250 basis point higher than the 10 year treasury bond (set at 5% for 2014). Loans may generally be amortized over a period corresponding to the life of the equipment, not to exceed 25 years, and must be repaid within 10 years. Loans for energy efficiency and energy conservation projects (including geothermal systems) have a 10-year amortization. Loans for manufacturing facilities are limited to $40,000 per job created within three years of loan approval. Failure to create the requisite number of jobs within three years may cause the interest rate to be raised by 3% over the remaining portion of the loan. Loans are also generally limited to $5 million, although higher amounts may be authorized on a case-by-case basis as determined by the DCED. '''Grants''' Maximum amount of grant for any alternative energy project or clean energy project is capped at $2 million or 30% of the project cost. Public Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) or Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) can get a grant up to 40% of the project costs, while a private CNG or LNG facility can get a grant up to 25% of the cost. Grant for Home Performance Building is capped at 10% of the cost; $500,000 for energy saving contracts (ESCOs); and $175,000 for planning and feasibility studies. Grants for manufacturing facilities are available for up to $10,000 for every job created within three years of grant approval. Total maximum amount of financial incentive including combination of loans and grants for any project is limited to 50% of the total project cost. '''Loan Guarantees''' Loan guarantees will take the form of a grant that may be used in the event of financing default on the part of the applicant. Loan guarantees are limited to 75% of the deficiency up to $5 million. The term of the grant may not exceed five years.<br> <br> Special Session H.B. 1 authorized a total of $165 million for this program. Visit the program web site and review the funding guidelines for additional program details and application procedures.<br> <br> <br> ''*While solar energy is in fact eligible under the state AEPS, a specific solar energy program was also authorized as part of the enabling legislation and as a result solar energy projects have been excluded from some other programs created by the same legislation. The program guidelines do not list solar energy as an eligible technology. However, it appears that some solar technologies could qualify if they are incorporated into the broader design of a High Performance Building.''
    r design of a High Performance Building.''  +
  • '''''NOTE:''''''' '''Next round of solicit
    '''''NOTE:''''''' '''Next round of solicitation is expected to open on July 1st, 2015. ''''' In July 2011, Connecticut enacted legislation amending the state's [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=CT04R&re=1&ee=1 Renewables Portfolio Standard] and creating two new classes of renewable energy credits (RECs): Zero Emission Renewable Energy Credits (ZRECs) and Low Emission Renewable Energy Credits (LRECs).<br> <br> The state's two investor-owned electric utilities, United Illuminating (UI) and Connecticut Light & Power (CL&P) must enter into 15-year contracts for RECs from zero-emission "Class I" renewable energy facilities (on the customer side of the meter) larger than 100 kilowatts (kW) but not larger than one megawatt (MW). Zero-emission Class I facilities include solar, wind and hydro generators. Resulting zero emission RECs (ZRECs) may be used for RPS compliance during the year of generation or the subsequent year. Utilities are required to spend $8 million on ZREC contracts annually.* The price cap of one ZREC in 2012 was $350, $325.50 in 2013, and $302.71 in 2014. The Connecticut Public Utilities Regulatory Authority (PURA) may reduce the ZREC price cap annually by 3% to 7%.<br> <br> The two utilities also must enter into 15-year contracts for RECs from low-emission Class I renewable energy facilities (on the customer side of the meter) up to 2 MW. The law establishes the emission criteria required to achieve "low-emission facility" status, but this category could include facilities that generate electricity using fuel cells, biomass or landfill gas. Resulting low-emission RECs (LRECs) may be used for RPS compliance during the year of generation or the subsequent year. Utilities are required to spend up to $4 million on LREC contracts annually.* The price cap of one LREC was $200 in 2012 and 2013.<br> <br> The utilities jointly submitted their six-year solicitation plan in December 2011 and issued their first request for proposals (RFP) in May 2012. Winning bids are evaluated based on project quality, proposed ZREC or LREC price, and compliance with the RFP process. Bids must be submitted by email. Projects must be located in CL&P's or UI's service territory.<br> <br> <br> ''* PURA is authorized to review this budget and make adjustments after Year 3 for LRECs and Year 4 for ZRECs. It may terminate the program entirely if technology costs do not continue to fall. Because the utilities must spend $8 million per year on new 15-year ZREC contracts and $4 million per year on new 15-year LREC contracts, the total value of the annual solicitation is $120 million for ZRECs and $60 million for LRECs.''<br> <br>
    million for LRECs.''<br> <br>  +
  • '''''Note'''''''''': Xcel Energy is no lon
    '''''Note'''''''''': Xcel Energy is no longer accepting new application submissions for the former Solar*Rewards (2013) and Minnesota Bonus (2014) programs. Check the '''''[http://www.xcelenergy.com/Save_Money_&_Energy/Rebates/Solar*Rewards_-_MN Program Website]''''' for updates.''''' '''Solar*Rewards Program''' Xcel Energy's Solar*Rewards Program provides an incentive for residential and commercial customers that install grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems of at least 0.5 kilowatts (kW) and less than 40 kW. Systems larger than 40 kW do not qualify for the program. Previously, the incentive took the form of an up-front rebate of $2.25 per watt (W) DC; this rate has been decreased to $1.50/W for the 2013 program year. The 2014 Solar Rewards program offers an incentive based on the kWh production from the PV system, as recorded by the production emter. This incentive is paid annually at $0.08/kWh produced over 10 years. In exchange for the up-front incentive, the customer is required to enter into a 20-year contract with Xcel Energy that transfers ownership of all renewable energy credits (RECs) produced by the system to the utility during the life of the contract. The annual budget for this program is $5 million, with $4.6 million going toward incentives. <br> In order to qualify for the program, the PV system must be installed on a property or a building located in Minnesota that is owned by the applicant and that receives electric service from Xcel Energy. New construction projects are eligible for incentives, but must have an Xcel Energy electric meter on-site and an electricity account set up with the utility. In addition, customers must have performed energy audit within the last three years that meets the standards of Xcel Energy's energy audit program and may be required to implement certain measures identified in the energy audit prior to participating in the Solar*Rewards program. In lieu of an energy audit, residential customers with homes that have been Energy Star certified through the utility's Energy Star project automatically qualify. Likewise, commercial customers that have participated in one of several commercial energy efficiency programs offered by the utility also automatically qualify.<br> <br> To receive the incentive, participants must submit an application and receive approval from Xcel Energy prior to installing the system. The program has a $250 application fee. If, prior to the completion of an engineering review, the application is denied or the customer elects not participate in the program, the customer's application fee will be refunded. All PV systems must use new equipment, carry a five-year warranty, and meet several other equipment and installation requirements designed to assure the safe and effective operation of the system.<br> <br> Net metering is available for Xcel Energy's customers, although customers may be eligible to enroll in one of several other customer-generation options if they wish instead of net metering. Under net metering net excess generation (NEG) at the end of a monthly billing period is generally credited to the next month’s bill. If a customer's NEG balance exceeds $25.00 at the end of a billing period, the customer will be issued a check for the balance by the utility. Net metering takes place using a bi-directional meter for which the customer pays a small monthly fee. The program also requires a generation meter installed at the utility's expense to measure energy (i.e., REC production) by the solar system. Applicants can view the Solar*Rewards Customer Contract at the link above.<br> <br> '''Minnesota Made Bonus PV Solar Rebate Program'''<br> In addition to the Solar Rebate Program offered by Xcel Energy, consumers can also qualify for an additional rebate of $2.75/W with the purchase of "Minnesota Made" solar energy systems. This additional rebate is made possible with the passage of the 2010 [https://www.revisor.mn.gov/statutes/?id=116C.7791 Minnesota Statute 116C.7791: Rebates for Solar Photovoltaic Modules]. If the funds for the Solar*Rewards Program have been exhausted, Minnesota Made projects will still receive $5.00/W from the Minnesota Made Bonus budget. This may affect how the funds are distributed; contact the program administrator for more details.<br> <br> The “Minnesota Made” PV Solar Rebate [http://www.mn.gov/commerce/energy/topics/resources/energy-legislation-initiatives/made-in-minnesota/ Program] was designed to encourage the development and use of PV modules receiving a specified minimum component assembly by a Minnesota-based manufacturer. Funding for the program is designated for five years, and the calculated "Minnesota Made" rebate is paid out with five equal annual payments accordingly. <br> ''Program Qualifications''<br> To qualify for the Minnesota Made incentive program, an applicant must: * Be an Xcel Energy customer and have applied for and received an Xcel Energy Solar*Rewards interconnection agreement (All current Solar*Rewards program requirements apply). * Install qualified “Minnesota Made” PV modules as defined by [https://www.revisor.mn.gov/statutes/?id=116C.7791 state statute]. * Submit a valid purchase order through the Solar*Rewards online application process for qualified “Minnesota Made” PV equipment to ensure funds are placed in reserve for the project. The fund reservation will be confirmed in a Minnesota Made Incentive Acknowledgement letter. * Install the PV system within the funding year that the incentive reservation was assigned. * Sign a Minnesota Made Rebate contract confirming the payment calculation assumptions prior to payment. ''Calculating the "Minnesota Made" Rebate''<br> In June 2011, the Minnesota Public Utilities Commission approved changes (Docket No. E-002/M-10-1278) to the methodology for calculating the "Minnesota Made" Rebate. There are [http://www.xcelenergy.com/staticfiles/xe/Marketing/Files/MN-Res-Bonus-PV-SR-Attachment-A.pdf two separate calculation methods], depending on whether or not the applicant is using federal depreciation tax benefits in excess of the federal taxes imposed on the payments. If the applicant agrees with the statement "that it will not use, or by contract or other agreement permit another entity to use, federal depreciation tax benefits that exceed the federal tax imposed on rebates awarded under this application," then the applicant should use the Example 1 calculation. If the applicant does not agree with the statement, the federal depreciation value is deducted from the pre-tax sum of all rebates. The highest applicable income tax rate is used to add back taxes that would be applied to the payment. Applicants that do not agree to the statement should use Example 2 in the above document in order to calculate the rebate.
    document in order to calculate the rebate.  +
  • '''''Note''''': '''''This exemption is onl
    '''''Note''''': '''''This exemption is only available to facilities operated in connection or conjunction with a publicly-owned sanitary landfill. The exemption was available to other entities only for systems placed in service by December 31, 2012. Systems in place before this date are eligible to receive the property tax exemption for 10 years.''''' Under Iowa's methane gas conversion property tax exemption, real and personal property used to decompose waste and convert the waste to gas, collect the methane or other gases, convert the gas to energy, or to collect waste for these purposes is exempt from property tax. This section was formerly written to only apply to facilities operated in connection with or in conjunction with a publicly-owned sanitary landfill. However, in 2009 the law was revised by [http://coolice.legis.iowa.gov/Cool-ICE/default.asp?category=billinfo&service=billbook&ga=83&hbill=SF478 S.F. 478] (retroactively effective to January 1, 2008) to apply to other technologies that use waste materials to generate methane (e.g., anaerobic digesters). This revision expired after December 31, 2012; for facilities that are not located at publicly-owned sanitary landfills, the exemption may only be claimed if the facility is placed in service between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2012. Such projects may only claim the exemption for 10 years, a restriction that is not placed on facilities at a publicly-owned sanitary landfill. If other fuels in addition to methane are burned, the exemption is equal to the ratio of methane in the overall fuel mix. The claimant must file an application ([http://www.iowa.gov/tax/forms/54065.pdf Form 54-065]) annually with the local assessor by February 1 of each year in order to claim the exemption.
    each year in order to claim the exemption.  +
  • '''''Note''''': '''''This program is set t
    '''''Note''''': '''''This program is set to expire at the end of 2014. ''''' Indianapolis Power & Light (IP&L) offers all customers rebates for small wind and photovoltaic (PV) installations completed after June 1, 2010. PV incentives are $1.00 per watt (W), up to a maximum of $4,000 with a minimum system size requirement of 2,000 W. Interested customers should complete the rebate application and interconnection application paperwork. These rebates are offered on a first-come, first-served basis and are only available to the extent that funding is available. IP&L allocated a total of $200,000 to the program for the two year period that ends December 2013. IP&L encourages customers taking advantage of this rebate to net meter as well.
    ntage of this rebate to net meter as well.  +
  • '''''Note'''': Xcel is not currently accep
    '''''Note'''': Xcel is not currently accepting proposals for this program. The most recent application deadline was April 1, 2013. See the program web site for information regarding future solicitations. '''''<br> <br> The Xcel Energy Renewable Development Fund (RDF) was created in 1999 as an outcome of 1994 Minnesota legislation concerning spent nuclear fuel at Xcel Energy’s Prairie Island Nuclear Plant. The original legislation has been amended and added to several times, expanding the amount of money collected by the fund and prescribing funding allocations for specific programs. Funding available for the grant program thus depends on the other funding obligations that need to be met with RDF funds at any given time. The Xcel RDF provides grants periodically through a Request for Proposals (RFP) process. Renewable-energy technologies eligible for funding typically include wind, biomass, solar, hydroelectric generators and fuel cells. Funding is generally split between new development projects that result in the production of renewable energy, and research and development. Wind energy production projects were not eligible for funding under the third and most recent grant cycle and will likely remain so under future cycles. However, wind remains generally eligible for projects not engaged in energy production.<br> <br> The first round of grants from the Xcel Energy RDF program, completed in 2001, supported 19 projects with nearly $16 million in funding. In 2005, the Minnesota Public Utilities Commission (PUC) approved the second round of projects funded from the Xcel Energy RDF program - 29 projects totaling nearly $37 million. The selections for the third and most recent round of projects - 22 projects totaling $22.6 million -- were approved by the PUC in April 2008. During the third cycle of funding a total $8.2 million was awarded to 5 energy production projects and $14.4 million was awarded to 17 R&D projects. Because of delays in the release of the fourth round of funding, there is approximately $30 million available for grants in the fourth round of funding. In April 2012, the Minnesota Legislature enacted a bill (S.F. 2181) to clarify the purpose of the RDF and create reporting requirements. Funds in the RDF account may only be used for the following purposes: * To increase the market penetration of renewable electric energy resources in Minnesota at reasonable costs * To promote the start-up, expansion, and attraction of renewable electric energy projects and companies within Minnesota * To stimulate in-state research and development into renewable electric energy technologies * To develop near-commercial and demonstration scale renewable electric projects or near-commercial and demonstration scale electric infrastructure delivery projects if those delivery projects enhance the delivery of renewable electric energy Xcel must submit an annual report to the legislature by February 15 describing the projects funded by the RDF. In addition, the projects receiving funds from the RDF must supply a written report detailing the project's financial, environmental, and other benefits. For details on past and current projects, please see the [http://www.xcelenergy.com/rdf/ program web site].
    www.xcelenergy.com/rdf/ program web site].  +
  • '''''Note: In June 2007, the Arizona Corp
    '''''Note: In June 2007, the Arizona Corporation Commission (ACC) initiated a rulemaking process to establish statewide interconnection standards for distributed generation (DG). This proceeding is still in progress. Until the new official rules go into effect, the commission has recommended that the utilities use the [http://images.edocket.azcc.gov/docketpdf/0000074361.pdf Interconnection Document] as a guide. This document applies to systems up to 10 megawatts (MW) in capacity. '''''<br> <br> The state's utilities independently developed interconnection agreements for distributed generation (DG) prior to the ACC's ongoing proceeding to establish statewide standards. The Salt River Project (SRP), which is not regulated by the ACC on utility matters, developed DG interconnection guidelines and an interconnection agreement based on draft rules and a report released by the ACC in 1999 and 2000, respectively. SRP's rules include technical protection requirements, a flow chart of interconnection procedures and a two-page interconnection application. The rules establish separate requirements for units based on system capacity: * Class I: 50 kilowatts (kW) or less, single or three-phase * Class II: 51 kW to 300 kW, three-phase * Class III: 301 kW to five megawatts (MW), three-phase * Class IV: greater than 5 MW, three-phase Tucson Electric Power (TEP) and Arizona Public Service (APS) -- the other two major electric utilities in Arizona -- have similarly established their own interconnection procedures for DG systems. It is likely that Arizona's regulated utilities will adopt the ACC's interconnection standards when the final rules are adopted.
    tandards when the final rules are adopted.  +
  • '''''Note: In October 2008, the Arizona C
    '''''Note: In October 2008, the Arizona Corporation Commission (ACC) adopted net metering rules that apply to all investor-owned electric utilities and electric cooperatives in the state. The Arizona attorney general is currently reviewing the rules, which must be certified before they take effect. After the rules are certified, utilities will have 120 days to file new net metering tariffs, and the ACC must approve these tariffs before they take effect. Until APS's new tariff take effect, the net metering program previously developed by APS will remain in place. (This program is described below.) Under the new state rules, net metering will be available to customers who generate electricity using solar, wind, hydroelectric, geothermal, biomass, biogas, combined heat and power (CHP), or fuel cell technologies. Individual system capacity will generally be limited to 125% of a customer's total connected electric load. ''''' Arizona Public Service (APS), the state's largest investor-owned utility, initiated a three-year pilot net-metering program in July 2007. Net metering is available to customers with systems up to 100 kilowatts (kW) in capacity that generate electricity using solar energy, wind energy or biomass energy. The program is capped at 15 megawatts (MW) of total aggregate capacity and is conditional on continued funding for the state's Environmental Portfolio Surcharge (EPS).* Net metering is accomplished using a bi-directional meter, which will be provided by the utility to each program participant at no charge. (The incremental meter costs will be funded by ratepayers through the EPS.) Any customer net excess generation (NEG) will be carried over to the customer's next bill at the utility's retail rate, as a kilowatt-hour (kWh) credit. Any NEG remaining at the customer’s last monthly bill in a calendar year or at the time of a customer shut-off will be granted to the utility. For customers taking service under a time-of-use rate, off-peak generation will be credited against off-peak consumption, and on-peak generation will be credited against on-peak consumption. The customer’s monthly bill is based on the net on-peak kWh and net off-peak kWh amounts. Any monthly customer NEG will be carried over to the customer's next bill as an off-peak or on-peak kWh credit. Any NEG remaining at the customer’s last monthly bill in a calendar year or at the time of a customer shut-off will be granted to the utility. ''* The utility's net-metering tariff states: "EPS funding will be utilized to recover the metering costs and billing-system modification cost. The net lost revenue associated with the pilot program will be deferred for future recovery and will be based on the difference between the retail rate and the utility’s avoided cost and applied to the partcipants’ excess generation."''
    to the partcipants’ excess generation."''  +
  • '''''Note: In October 2008, the Arizona C
    '''''Note: In October 2008, the Arizona Corporation Commission (ACC) adopted net metering rules that apply to all investor-owned electric utilities and electric cooperatives in the state. The Arizona attorney general is currently reviewing the rules, which must be certified before they take effect. After the rules are certified, utilities will have 120 days to file new net metering tariffs, and the ACC must approve these tariffs before they take effect. Until TEP's new tariff take effect, the net metering program previously developed by TEP will remain in place. (This program is described below.) Under the new state rules, net metering will be available to customers who generate electricity using solar, wind, hydroelectric, geothermal, biomass, biogas, combined heat and power (CHP), or fuel cell technologies. Individual system capacity will generally be limited to 125% of a customer's total connected electric load. ''''' Tucson Electric Power Company (TEP) offers net metering to customers with photovoltaic (PV) and wind-energy systems with a maximum AC peak capacity of 10 kilowatts (kW). TEP credits net excess generation (NEG) to the following month's bill. After each January billing cycle, any remaining credit is granted to the utility. The total net-metered capacity in TEP's service territory is limited to 500 kW. Installations must meet the IEEE 929 standard, local requirements and National Electrical Code (NEC)requirements. Installations must be completed within six months of pre-installation approval. Time-of-use net metering is not permitted.
    Time-of-use net metering is not permitted.  +
  • '''''Note: The information below is for r
    '''''Note: The information below is for reference only. There is no more funding available for this rebate program. This program received $14.4 million in federal funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA). This funding was used to award rebates to systems in the application queue. FY 2009-2010 is the last year of the solar rebate program and the last year the program could be funded under the current authorizing statute. This program has not been extended by the Florida Legislature and will expire June 30, 2010. November 16, 2010, the Florida Legislature approved additional funding for the rebate program for systems that were approved during the program but never received reimbursement. Questions regarding rebates should be directed toward the Florida Energy and Climate Commission at 850-487-3800 or energy@eog.myflorida.com. ''''' Florida's Solar Energy System Incentives Program was established in June 2006 ([http://www.flsenate.gov/data/session/2006/Senate/bills/billtext/pdf/s0888er.pdf SB 888]) to provide financial incentives for the purchase and installation of solar energy systems from July 1, 2006, through June 30, 2010. A total of $2.5 million was available for FY 2006-2007; $3.5 million was available for FY 2007-2008, and $5 million was available for FY 2008-09. The program, administered by the Florida Energy and Climate Commission, provides rebates to Florida residents, businesses, non-profits and public facilities that purchase and install new photovoltaic (PV) systems two kilowatts (kW) or larger in capacity, solar water heating systems that provide at least 50% of a building's hot water consumption, and a solar thermal pool heaters. The incentive amounts for each solar technology are as follows: '''Solar PV Systems''' * Residential: $4/watt DC, up to $20,000 * Commercial, Non-profit, Multi-Family and Public Facilities: $4/watt DC, up to $100,000 '''Solar Water Heating Systems''' * Residential: $500 per installation * Commercial, Non-profit, Multi-Family and Public Facilities: $15 per 1,000 BTU per day, up to $5,000 (BTUs must be metered) '''Solar Thermal Pool Heaters''' * $100 per installation Applications for the rebate must be submitted within 120 days of the purchase of the solar energy equipment.
    he purchase of the solar energy equipment.  +
  • '''''Note: The requirements listed below
    '''''Note: The requirements listed below are current only up to the date of last review (see the top of this page). The City of Austin may also make additional requirements depending on the circumstances of a given project. Interested parties should contact the program office for more detailed information when planning a project.'''''<br> The City of Austin has numerous green building provisions within the city building code, with requirements that vary according to location, zoning designation and building type. The building standards rely on the Austin Energy Green Building Rating system and the LEED certification system as metrics. In some cases developers have the option of achieving compliance under either of the two systems. Under the Austin Energy Green Building Rating System, buildings are awarded up to five stars depending on the number and breadth of green building elements that are incorporated into the design. In terms of energy efficiency, rated buildings are designed to exceed the Austin Energy Code, which itself is one of the most aggressive in the nation (see Climate Protection Plan information at bottom). While these standards are among the most progressive in the nation, the City of Austin has taken the Green Building Program much further. In February 15, 2007, the city council passed Resolution No. 20070215-23, the Austin Climate Protection Plan, calling for the drafting of new building codes consistent with reducing energy used in single-family homes by 65% and all other public and private buildings by 75% by 2015. The Zero-Energy Capable Homes (ZECH) Task Force was designated to draft design [http://www.polarhide.com/zeh_final_report.pdf recommendations] and progressively increasing goals for the program, and the first series of code amendments were adopted by the City Council on October 18, 2007. The new building codes are based on the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) with amendments according to program targets. The November 2006 version of the Austin Energy Code served as a reference until 2010 when Ordinance No. 20100408-051 adopted the 2009 the IECC with local amendments as the third phase of the Zero Energy Capable Homes initiative under the Austin Climate Protection Plan. An Energy Efficiency Retrofits (EER) Task Force was created by Resolution No. 20071213-64 in December 2007 to examine strategies for reducing energy use in existing buildings. The EER Task Force issued its own [http://www.austinenergy.com/About%20Us/Environmental%20Initiatives/ordinance/finalTaskForceReport.pdf recommendations] in September 2008. The City Council subsequently adopted Resolution No. 20081106-048 in November 2008 setting a series of energy efficiency improvement goals for the city's existing residential and commercial buildings. The structure and timing of the goals differ for residential, multi-family residential, and commercial structures (see resolution for details). In a related adoption, Resolution No. 20081106-047 established energy conservation audit and disclosure requirements for residential, commercial, and multi-family residential buildings. In general for residential buildings more than 10 years old, audits must be completed prior to any sale and the results disclosed to prospective purchasers. For commercial and multi-family buildings, any building more than 10 years old as of June 1, 2009 must have an audit performed by June 1, 2011. For other buildings, this must be completed within 10 years after the facility was constructed. Please see the actual resolution for additional details and exceptions. Information about public building standards in Austin can be accessed [http://www.dsireusa.org/library/includes/incentive2.cfm?Incentive_Code=TX14R&state=TX&CurrentPageID=1&RE=1&EE=1 here].
    p;CurrentPageID=1&RE=1&EE=1 here].  +
  • '''''Note: This program was fully subscri
    '''''Note: This program was fully subscribed as of December 2005. However, the Rhode Island State Energy Office is still accepting applications, which will be placed in queue upon receipt.''''' Rhode Island's PV and Wind Rebate Program offers residents and small businesses a rebate of $3.50 per watt for photovoltaic (PV) systems with a maximum capacity of 2 kilowatts (kW) and $3.00 per watt for PV systems with a capacity between 2 kW and 6 kW. Residents who install wind-energy systems with a maximum capacity of 50 kW are eligible for a rebate of $2.00 per watt (up to 50% of the system's cost). This program is funded by the Rhode Island Renewable Energy Fund, the state's public benefits fund. Contact the Rhode Island State Energy Office for current program information or information on participating PV vendors.
    r information on participating PV vendors.  +
  • '''''Note: '''''''''''''''Note: '''''The S
    '''''Note: '''''''''''''''Note: '''''The Solar Currents program fulfilled phase two of their pilot program of additional 2 megawatts of customer-owned solar projects by 2015, and are no longer accepting applications. Although the program web site above links to the residential section of DTE Energy's web page, the program itself is not limited to residential customers. Other customers that meet the program requirements are also eligible to participate.'''''<br> <br> DTE Energy offers incentives through the Solar Currents program to its electric customers that install photovoltaic systems with a capacity of 1 kilowatt (kW) to 20 kW. For residential customers, the program offers both an up-front rebate of $0.20 per DC watt and a production incentive of $0.03 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) for the renewable energy credits (RECs) produced by the system through August 31, 2029. The rates for non-residential customers are $0.13/W upfront and $0.02/W for the RECs. Both new systems and existing PV systems with valid DTE Energy Net Metering and Interconnection Agreements are eligible to participate in the program. All systems must be grid-connected, net metered, and be sized not to exceed on-site energy needs.<br> <br> The up-front rebate (characterized as a REC pre-payment by DTE Energy) is payable upon the successful installation of the system.The production incentive payments are received as a credit on the customer's electricity bill. At the end of the calendar year the customer will receive a check for any unused bill credits from the utility if the balance is more then $250. The level of the production incentive is not affected by whether or not the system is a new system or an existing system.<br> <br> The production incentive portion requires all systems to be equipped with a separate generation meter -- provided at no cost to the customer by DTE Energy -- to measure total system energy production (i.e., REC production). System owners are responsible for costs associated with connecting the system to the grid and for wiring and meter socket installation costs associated with the generation meter. Additional requirements, including minimum equipment standards (e.g., CEC listing for PV modules) and installer qualification requirements are described above and in further detail on the program web site. The utility recommends, but does not require, that all new systems carry a 5 year installation warranty, and manufacturer warranties of 5 years on inverters and 20 years on PV modules. All systems are subject to post-installation inspection by utility personnel.<br> <br> The program is being offered as part of DTE Energy's compliance plan under the state [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=MI16R&re=1&ee=1 Renewable Portfolio Standard]. Four rounds of funding are expected, with 500 kW of installations expected each round. Pricing will be reviewed after each offering. For the first round of offerings, 1.5 MW is reserved for residential systems, and 0.5 MW is reserved for non-residential. The application periods will open on per the below schedule: * January 7, 2013 * June 24, 2013 * January 2014 * June 2014 <br> Please consult the program web site for additional information on net metering, interconnection requirements, and further program rules.
    n requirements, and further program rules.  +
  • '''''Note: ''''''''''Check the program web
    '''''Note: ''''''''''Check the program web site for information regarding solicitations.''''' The Economic Development Corporation (EDC) of the City of Detroit is offering financial assistance to commercial, institutional, and public buildings in Detroit that install energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. Loans are available between $50,000 to $150,000. Eligible technologies include building insulation, glazing treatments, windows, doors, weatherstripping, insulated roofs, solar panels, geothermal installations, wind, hydroelectric, thermal load reduction, HVAC, interior and exterior lighting, electrical, humidification, and low flow water/plumbing projects. Other technologies may also be eligible for funding. In order to apply for financial assistance, contact the Program Manager listed below. Applicants may use funding from this grant program in combination with the [http://dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=MI113F&re=1&ee=1 SmartBuildings Detroit Grant Program]. ''This program is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) [http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/betterbuildings/neighborhoods/ Better Buildings Program]. The DOE has awarded over $500 million in federal funds to more than 40 states, local governments, and organizations to administer local programs targeting a variety of building types. Combined, these local programs are expected to improve the efficiency of more than 170,000 buildings through 2013 and save up to $65 million in energy costs annually.''<br> <br>
    rgy costs annually.''<br> <br>  +
  • '''''Note: ''''''''''In 2010, the Federal
    '''''Note: ''''''''''In 2010, the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA), which has authority over mortgage underwriters Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, ''''''''''[http://www.fhfa.gov/Media/PublicAffairs/Pages/FHFA-Statement-on-Certain-Energy-Retrofit-Loan-Programs.aspx directed]'''''''''' these enterprises against purchasing mortgages of homes with a PACE lien due to its senior status above a mortgage. Most residential PACE activity subsided following this directive; however, some residential PACE programs are now operating with loan loss reserve funds, appropriate disclosures, or other protections meant to address FHFA's concerns. Commercial PACE programs were not directly affected by FHFA’s actions, as Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac do not underwrite commercial mortgages. Visit [http://pacenow.org/ PACENow] for more information about PACE financing, and for a comprehensive list of all PACE programs across the country.''''' Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing effectively allows property owners to borrow money to pay for energy improvements. The amount borrowed is typically repaid via a special assessment on the property over a period of years. Florida statutes authorize municipalities and counties to establish dependent special districts with the authority to collect revenue via a special assessment. (Not all local governments in Florida offer PACE financing; ''contact your local government to find out if it has established a PACE financing program''.) '''Florida PACE Programs''' To be eligible for PACE financing, a local program at the city or county level must be available in your area. Jurisdictional eligibility rules vary by county and municipality; municipalities in an eligible county are not automatically eligible for PACE financing. Counties with PACE programs as of August 2014 included Flagler, Gadsden, Gulf, Indian River, Jefferson, Loean, Martin, Miami-Dade, Nassau, Palm Beach, Pinellas, and St. Lucie. Examples of active local PACE programs in Florida include: * Flager County and the City of Kissimmee chartered the [http://www.floridapace.gov/ Florida PACE Funding Agency] offer PACE financing to residential and commercial entities * Leon County created the [http://www.leoncountyfl.gov/growinggreen/ Leon Energy Assistance Program (LEAP)] * Miami-Dade County created the [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=FL122F&re=1&ee=1 Voluntary Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program] * Town of Lantana and Town of Magnolia Park joined to incorporate the [http://www.floridagreenenergyworks.com/ Florida Green Energy Works] program, administered by the Florida Green Finance Authority. Since first formed by Lantana and Magnolia Park, the towns of West Palm Beach, Delray Beach, Boynton Beach, Tequesta and Lake Worth have also joined the Florida Green Finance Authority. * The communities of Cutler Bay, Miami, South Miami, Pinecrest, Palmetto Bay, and Miami Shores formed the [http://ygrene.us/fl/green_corridor Clean Energy Green Corridor District] * The [http://cleanenergyloanprogram.org/ Solar and Energy Loan Fund (SELF) Program] based in St. Lucie offers a commercial PACE program. '''Program Provisions''' Specific qualifying improvements are locally determined. The loans made to property owners are secured with a lien that is equal to county taxes and assessments. To participate in this program, property owners must have paid property taxes and not been delinquent for the previous three years. Additionally, the total assessment cannot be for an amount greater than 20% of the assessed value of the property. Local governments may pool together with other local governments to finance and administer programs. '''Program Creation''' Local governments were granted clear authority to create PACE financing programs with the passage of HB 7179 in May 2010. This legislation authorizes local governments - including counties, municipalities and dependent special districts - to levy non-ad valorem assessments to fund energy efficiency and conservation improvements, renewable energy improvements, and wind resistance improvements. In addition to authority granted by HB 7179, existing Florida law authorizes municipalities and counties to create special districts for financing a variety of projects that serve the public purpose and benefit the municipality or county. Many special districts currently exist to finance public infrastructure and administer various programs that serve the public purpose and benefit property owners and the municipality or county. A municipality or county can create a dependent special district to administer a PACE program. The Special District Information Program of the Florida Department of Community Affairs has a [http://www.floridajobs.org/community-planning-and-development/assistance-for-governments-and-organizations/special-district-information-program/florida-special-district-handbook-online handbook] that summarizes how counties and municipalities may create a dependent special district.
    s may create a dependent special district.  +
  • '''''Note: ''''''''''In 2010, the Federal
    '''''Note: ''''''''''In 2010, the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA), which has authority over mortgage underwriters Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, ''''''''''[http://www.fhfa.gov/Media/PublicAffairs/Pages/FHFA-Statement-on-Certain-Energy-Retrofit-Loan-Programs.aspx directed]'''''''''' these enterprises against purchasing mortgages of homes with a PACE lien due to its senior status above a mortgage. Most residential PACE activity subsided following this directive; however, some residential PACE programs are now operating with loan loss reserve funds, appropriate disclosures, or other protections meant to address FHFA's concerns. Commercial PACE programs were not directly affected by FHFA’s actions, as Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac do not underwrite commercial mortgages. Visit [http://pacenow.org/ PACENow] for more information about PACE financing, and for a comprehensive list of all PACE programs across the country.'''''<br> <br> Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing effectively allows property owners to borrow money to pay for energy improvements. The amount borrowed is typically repaid via a special assessment on the property over a period of years. Louisiana has authorized certain local governments to establish such programs, as described below. (Not all local governments in Louisiana offer PACE financing; contact your local government to find out if it has established a PACE financing program.)<br> <br> In July 2009, Louisiana legislators enacted SB 224 that enabled local governments to create a Sustainable Energy Financing District (SEFD) via ordinance or resolution. Once established, the owner of any immovable residential or commercial property may consent to include a property in the SEFD and execute a "cooperative endeavor agreement" with the district to receive financing for energy improvements. An owner's consent may be given before or after the initial creation of the district, and the district does not have to be contiguous. In 2010, Louisiana legislators enacted HB 973 that provided financing qualifications and restrictions for energy efficiency improvement or renewable energy improvement loans. These include: * limiting the total amount borrowed by property owners to 10 percent of the reasonable expected fair market value of the property * equity must be available in the property, meaning the loan-to-value ratio cannot exceed 100% * maximum assessment amount per year shall not exceed the amount of the principal and interest for said year * property owners must be current on all outstanding mortgages and demonstrate ability to repay loan * energy audit must be conducted and reviewed by the district prior to finance approval * the SEFD must make written verification on residential properties that improvements were installed and work is completed prior to loan fund disbursement * work must be performed by qualified contractors, subcontractors and tradesmen * for loans over $100,000 a written notice must be sent to the mortgagee regarding the proposed program loan. The mortgagee then has 30 to approve or deny proposed program loan. (failure of mortgagee to provide written notice of ruling results in procession of loan) <br> A SEFD may borrow money, issue bonds or obligations, and pay for the bonds from assessments against property. Loan terms will be decided by the governing body of the district, including interest rates, administrative fees, and maximum loan amounts. The district is permitted to provide a source of revenue for retrofitting and installing improvements, products, systems, devices, or interacting groups of devices installed behind the meter of residential and commercial buildings that conserve energy or produce energy from renewable resources. Eligible technologies are determined locally, but may include: * Insulation in walls, roofs, floors, foundations, and heating/cooling distribution systems; * Storm and multi-glazed windows and doors; * Heat absorbing/reflective glazed and coated window and door systems, additional glazing, reductions in glass area, and other energy-efficient window and door systems; * Automatic energy control systems; * HVAC system upgrades and replacements; * Caulking and weather stripping (up to $1,500); * Daylighting and efficient lighting; and * Energy-recovery systems. Renewable-energy improvements that interfere with a right held by a public utility regulated by the Louisiana Public Service Commission are not eligible.<br> <br> New Orleans plans to create a Sustainable Energy Financing District with the help of a "special projects" grant from the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative.
    . Department of Energy SunShot Initiative.  +
  • '''''Note: ''''''''''In 2010, the Federal
    '''''Note: ''''''''''In 2010, the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA), which has authority over mortgage underwriters Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, ''''''''''[http://www.fhfa.gov/Media/PublicAffairs/Pages/FHFA-Statement-on-Certain-Energy-Retrofit-Loan-Programs.aspx directed]'''''''''' these enterprises against purchasing mortgages of homes with a PACE lien due to its senior status above a mortgage. Most residential PACE activity subsided following this directive; however, some residential PACE programs are now operating with loan loss reserve funds, appropriate disclosures, or other protections meant to address FHFA's concerns. Commercial PACE programs were not directly affected by FHFA’s actions, as Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac do not underwrite commercial mortgages. Visit [http://pacenow.org/ PACENow] for more information about PACE financing, and for a comprehensive list of all PACE programs across the country.'''''<br> <br> Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing effectively allows property owners to borrow money to pay for energy improvements. The amount borrowed is typically repaid via a special assessment on the property over a period of years. Ohio has authorized certain local governments to establish such programs, as described below. (Not all local governments in Ohio offer PACE financing; contact your local government to find out if it has established a PACE financing program. '''Ohio PACE Programs''' To be eligible for PACE financing, a local program at the city or county level must be available in your area. Jurisdictional eligibility rules vary by county and municipality; municipalities in an eligible county are not automatically eligible for PACE financing. Examples of active local PACE programs in Ohio include: * [http://www.toledoportauthority.org/en-us/programs/betterbuildingsnwo/eligibility.aspx BetterBuildings Northwest Ohio] – Administered by Toledo-Lucas County Port Authority * [http://gcpace.org/ Cincinnati PACE] – Administered by the Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance * [http://lcport.org/bond-financing Lake County PACE] – Administered by the Lake County Port & Economic Development Authority * [http://www.neoaed.org/ Northeast Ohio Advanced Energy District] - The City of Cleveland in partnership with the First Suburbs Development Council has announced the creation of the Advanced Energy Special Improvement District and commercial loans for energy improvements * The City of Toledo has created a [http://www.toledoportauthority.org/en-us/programs/betterbuildingsnwo/energyspecialimprovementdistrict.aspx SID] in collaboration with the Northwest Ohio Bond Fund in order to finance energy efficiency improvements. '''Program Provisions''' Legislation enacted in Ohio in July 2009 (HB 1) expanded the state's existing special improvement district law by authorizing local municipalities and townships to create '''special energy improvement districts''' that offer property owners financing to install photovoltaic (PV) or solar-thermal systems on real property. In June 2010, legislation (S.B. 232*) provided additional authorization to municipalities to allow for financing of geothermal, customer-generated systems (including wind, biomass, and gasification systems 250 kW and below; or 250 kW and above as long as they serve all or part of the owner's on-site load) and energy efficiency improvements that are permanently fixed to the property within a special energy improvement district. Any municipality choosing to establish a Special Energy Improvement District (SID) is authorized by law to issue bonds (either special or general obligation funds) and/or apply for state or federal money in order to fund such programs. Any property owner who opts in to such a program and installs solar, geothermal, wind, biomass, gasification, or energy efficiency improvements permanently affixed to his/her real property using municipal financing must agree to a special assessment on the property tax bill for up to 30 years in order to pay for the financing secured through this mechanism. Many other provisions are determined locally. '''Program Creation''' Municipalities and townships interested in creating such districts and providing financing for property owners must circulate a petition for eligible property owners to opt in to the program and the municipality must approve a special energy improvement district via ordinance or resolution. A special improvement district board of directors must be created (if one did not already exist) to implement the program. Each local municipality must determine specific eligibility criteria, the maximum financing amount and interest rates, and other terms. Unlike regular special improvement districts in Ohio, a special energy improvement district does not have to be comprised of contiguous properties.<br> <br> *''In addition, S.B. 232 includes a provision for aggregating renewable energy certificates created by projects within a district. The bill also allows any electricity savings and/or demand reduction resulting from projects within a district to count towards the electric distribution utility's compliance under the Energy Efficiency Resource Standard (22% reduction in electricity use by 2026 and peak demand reduction requirements under Ohio's Revised Code ([http://codes.ohio.gov/orc/4928.66 ORC 4928.66]). This would not include any industrial customers who choose to commit its savings to the utility in exchange for an exemption from the utility's energy efficiency cost recovery mechanism, as provided by law. The district would have to report to the utility regarding energy projects implemented in the special energy improvement district on a quarterly basis.''
    provement district on a quarterly basis.''  +
  • '''''Note: ''''''''''In 2010, the Federal
    '''''Note: ''''''''''In 2010, the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA), which has authority over mortgage underwriters Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, [http://www.fhfa.gov/Media/PublicAffairs/Pages/FHFA-Statement-on-Certain-Energy-Retrofit-Loan-Programs.aspx directed] these enterprises against purchasing mortgages of homes with a PACE lien due to its senior status above a mortgage. Most residential PACE activity subsided following this directive; however, some residential PACE programs are now operating with loan loss reserve funds, appropriate disclosures, or other protections meant to address FHFA's concerns. Commercial PACE programs were not directly affected by FHFA’s actions, as Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac do not underwrite commercial mortgages. Visit [http://pacenow.org/ PACENow] for more information about PACE financing and a comprehensive list of all PACE programs across the country.'''''<br> <br> '''''[http://www.gencourt.state.nh.us/legislation/2014/HB0532.html H.B 532] enacted in August 2014 included various amendments to the PACE program in regards to financing, eligibility and enforcement. These changes are effective after September 30, 2014. ''''' Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing effectively allows property owners to borrow money from a local government to pay for energy improvements. The amount borrowed is typically repaid via a special assessment on the property over a period of years. New Hampshire has authorized local governments to establish such programs, as described below. (Not all local governments in New Hampshire offer PACE financing; contact your local government to find out if it has established a PACE financing program.) New Hampshire enacted legislation in June 2010 (H.B. 1554) authorizing the state's cities, towns and village districts to establish energy efficiency and clean energy districts. To create such a district, a local government may incur debt (including through issuance of municipal revenue bonds, Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds or Clean Renewable Energy Bonds), establish revolving funds, provide financing and collect assessments to implement the program. [http://www.gencourt.state.nh.us/legislation/2014/HB0532.html H.B 532] enacted in August 2014, allows additional flexibility to obtain financing from private individuals or institutions. The act also requires the municipality to notify and get consent of any prior mortgages or liens that exist in the property before providing a municipal lien. The municipality may still choose to make a loan even if the mortgagees or lienholders do not consent, however in such case during the event of foreclosure, the municipal lien shall be extinguished. Legislation enacted in July 2011 (H.B. 144) specified that PACE liens are junior to any existing liens. Owners of private property (zoned for residential, commercial, industrial or "other" uses) may opt in to an energy financing district after such a district has been created and may obtain funding for a broad array of energy efficiency upgrades and/or renewable energy investments that are permanently affixed on or off the property. Energy improvements must be installed by qualified contractors after an energy audit is conducted. The minimum total amount of assessments for a single-family property is $5,000, and the maximum is $35,000 or 15% of the assessed value of the property multiplied by the municipality's current equalization ratio, whichever is less. For other properties, the maximum is $60,000 or 15% of the assessed value of the property multiplied by the municipality's current equalization ratio, whichever is less. In November 2010, the town of Durham became the first in New Hampshire to establish a PACE financing program.
    ire to establish a PACE financing program.  +
  • '''''Note: ''''''''''Program Period 6 for
    '''''Note: ''''''''''Program Period 6 for the Re-MAT program began in September 2014. The feed-in tariff program for bioenergy projects was established by SB 1122 but will require action by the CPUC before it is available. The CPUC's proposed rules can be found '''[http://docs.cpuc.ca.gov/PublishedDocs/Efile/G000/M081/K583/81583311.PDF here]''. All investor-owned utilities and publicly-owned utilities with 75,000 or more customers must make a standard Renewable Market Adjusting Tariff (ReMAT) available to their customers. As the ReMAT is meant to help the utilities meet California's renewable portfolio standard (RPS), all green attributes associated with the energy, including renewable energy credits (RECs), transfer to the utility with the sale. Any customer-generator who sells power to the utility under this tariff may not participate in other state incentive programs. The tariffs will be available until the combined statewide cumulative capacity of eligible generation installed equals 750 megawatts (MW) for the general ReMAT program, and 250 MW for the bioenergy ReMAT program. Each utility will be responsible for a portion of those cumulative totals based on their proportionate sales. The CPUC has regulatory authority over the investor-owned utilities, but not publicly-owned utilities. Therefore, the rules adopted by the CPUC do not apply to the publicly-owned utilities. Instead, the governing board of each publicly-owned utility is wholly responsible for developing their tariffs within the parameters established by the legislature in CA Public Utilities Code § 399.32 (formerly CA Public Utilities Code § 387.6). The collective share of the 750 MW program capacity established by the legislature for which the investor-owned utilities are responsible is 493.6 MW. The remaining 256.4 MW is to be divided between the publicly-owned utilities. Investor-owned utilities are solely responsible for the 250 MW bioenergy program. '''Investor-Owned Utilities (General ReMAT program)''' The California ReMAT allows eligible customer-generators to enter into 10-, 15- or 20-year standard contracts with their utilities to sell the electricity produced by small renewable energy systems (up to 3 megawatts (MW)). The CPUC has separated the technologies eligible to participate in the feed-in tariff into three project type categories: Baseload (bioenergy and geothermal), As-Available Peaking (solar), and As-Available Non-Peaking (wind and hydro). The ReMAT starting price is based on the weighted average of the three investor-owned utilities highest executed contract resulting from the Renewable Auction Mechanism ([http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=CA244F&re=1&ee=1 RAM]) auction held in November 2011. Based on the results of that auction the starting price was $89.23 per megawatt-hour (MWh). As of September 2014, the current price for Baseload and As-Available Non-Peaking resources remains $89.23 per MWh; the current price for As-Available Peaking resources is $57.23 per MWh. The CPUC built in price adjustment mechanisms to allow the program to adapt to changing market conditions. Interested generators must start by submitting a program participation request with the utility. The utility will establish a queue on a first-come first-served basis for each product type and will extend a ReMAT price offer to the applicants. The applicant can either accept or reject the contract. The price adjustments are only triggered if at least five projects with different developers for a certain product type apply. If no projects accept the Re-MAT, or less than 50% of the initial starting capacity for that project type accept the Re-MAT after its first two months, then the price will be escalated by $4 per MWh for the third and fourth months. The price will continue to escalate in subsequent two-month blocks until the subscription capacity is equal to 50% or more of the initial starting capacity for that project type. Similarly, if the program demonstrates excessive interest, the Re-MAT will be adjusted downward every two months. '''Investor-Owned Utilities (Bioenergy ReMAT program)''' SB 1122 of 2012 requires the investor-owned utilities to operate a separate ReMAT program for a cumulative total of 250 MW of bioenergy projects, separate from the wider 750 MW program. The legislation subdivided the 250 MW limit across different bioenergy sources: * 110 MW for biogas from wastewater treatment, municipal organic waste diversion, food processing, and codigestion * 90 MW for dairy and other agricultural bioenergy * 50 MW for bioenergy using byproducts of sustainable forest management The CPUC, in consultation with the California Energy Commission (CEC), the State Air Resources Board, the Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, the Department of Food and Agriculture, and the Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery, may reallocate the 250 MW requirement among the categories if they determine the allocations referenced above are not appropriate. The legislation sets a deadline of June 1, 2013 for this new program to be in place. '''Publicly-Owned Utilities''' All publicly-owned utilities with 75,000 or more customers are required to develop feed-in tariffs by July 1, 2013. In determining the rate to pay under the tariffs, publicly-owned utilities must consider: * The value of every kilowatt-hour (kWh) on a time of delivery basis * Avoided costs for distribution and transmission system upgrades * The ability of systems to offset peak demand on the distribution circuit * All current and anticipated environmental and greenhouse gas reduction compliance costs CA Public Utilities Code § 399.32 provides more guidance for publicly-owned utilities in developing their tariffs, including conditions in which the utility may limit the program. Customers of publicly-owned utilities with 75,000 or more customers should contact their utility for more information. Customers of one of the investor-owned utilities can contact the appropriate program administrator for more information: '''Southern California Edison'''<br> George Wiltsee<br> (626) 302-4945<br> [mailto:george.wiltsee@sce.com george.wiltsee@sce.com]<br> [https://www.sce.com/wps/portal/home/procurement/renewable-alternative-power-contract-opportunities/!ut/p/b1/xVTBTuMwEP2VXDhaduImto9ZUbXpQnahXdHmUjnJuAQ1jklMu_D161ZdIQ4kRULgk8fz5lnvzdg4w0ucabmrNtJWjZbbQ5xFa59P4mkyJwlhV4IkP37fjsVC0IhFDrByAPLOiklf_fU8xHc4w1mhrbH3eNUVsC4abUHbNegLctpfkP19s4VObsEDDe3m2TNtUzy1UB-zrTvcy9xlpS49ubXQaidgB55p9tB6B5pWFtZrjGla-6QrW0F3uNjIDZTQVRt9jIqqxCulojJiAlBQco5GjAYo92GEuAoE-LmSPoeT7B5dfbJ9OlDvAAO2H23rh_QCOKMngJiQ8XT2iySTxQ0lCb0h6TyOKSH_GXp6m06bGvDKaWHvahEBnr-aS0MpuGIC0bx05oaMIS5KhUTJaeGTaFQIf4BwGn42Ifsw4eyM_lYPj49Z7Ib7MMR_LV5-6XQP13VmZ1BlTL87UfrGnbMexwBh8NmE_ocJZ2d8a9_bP2zqPzV_UD-votuxulyoul6nKcry0OxejtF1F_8DDlTWzQ!!/dl4/d5/L2dBISEvZ0FBIS9nQSEh/ http://www.sce.com/EnergyProcurement/renewables/renewables-standard-contracts.htm]<br> <br> '''Pacific Gas and Electric'''<br> [mailto:Feed-inTariffs@pge.com Feed-inTariffs@pge.com]<br> [http://www.pge.com/b2b/energysupply/wholesaleelectricsuppliersolicitation/standardcontractsforpurchase/ http://www.pge.com/b2b/energysupply/wholesaleelectricsuppliersolicitation/standardcontractsforpurchase/]<br> <br> '''San Diego Gas and Electric'''<br> Uyen Nguyen,<br> (858) 650-1973<br> [mailtoUNguyen@semprautilities.com UNguyen@semprautilities.com]<br> [http://sdge.com/node/654 http://sdge.com/node/654]<br> <br> <br> '''Background:'''<br> California enacted legislation ([http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/pub/05-06/bill/asm/ab_1951-2000/ab_1969_bill_20060929_chaptered.html Assembly Bill 1969]) in September 2006 requiring every electrical corporation to file with the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) a standard tariff for renewable energy output produced by a public water or wastewater agency that is a retail customer of an electrical corporation. A subsequent CPUC decision ([http://docs.cpuc.ca.gov/PUBLISHED/FINAL_DECISION/70660.htm D.07-07-027]), issued in July 2007, authorized two expansions of the tariffs. First, Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) and Southern California Edison (SCE) were required to submit separate tariffs for the purchase of eligible renewable generation from entities other than public water and wastewater agencies. Second, PG&E, SCE and San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E) were all required to offer both a full buy/sell option and an excess sale option in each tariff submitted for approval. Other electrical corporations were only required to offer the full buy/sell option, but they could offer both options if they chose to do so. The Public Utilities Code of California was subsequently amended by [http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/pub/07-08/bill/sen/sb_0351-0400/sb_380_bill_20080928_chaptered.pdf SB 380] of 2008, and again by [http://leginfo.ca.gov/pub/09-10/bill/sen/sb_0001-0050/sb_32_bill_20090915_enrolled.pdf SB 32] of 2009, each increasing the individual system capacity and aggregate capacity allowed statewide under the Feed-in Tariff program. Pricing under this program was originally tied to the Market Price Referent, but decision 12-05-035 changed the pricing mechanism to tie it to the Renewable Market Adjustment Tariff.
    to the Renewable Market Adjustment Tariff.  +
  • '''''Note: ''''''''[http://www.legislature
    '''''Note: ''''''''[http://www.legislature.mi.gov/documents/2011-2012/publicact/pdf/2011-PA-0038.pdf ''Public Act 38 of 2011'']'' repealed the Michigan Business Tax (MBT) and implemented the Corporate Income Tax (CIT). ''[http://www.legislature.mi.gov/documents/2011-2012/publicact/pdf/2011-PA-0039.pdf ''Public Act 39'']'''''''' was passed in conjunction with the CIT and allows for certain credits awarded under the MBT to be retained for the duration of the agreements. Businesses receiving certain credits, including Renaissance Zone credits, may choose to either continue to file under the MBT to continue claiming their credits, or file under the CIT. No additional Renaissance Zone credits will be awarded after 2011. ''''' Businesses certified by the NextEnergy Authority that locate in the NextEnergy Zone to research, develop, or manufacture "alternative energy technologies," as defined by the Michigan Next Energy Authority Act, may claim a credit equal to their qualified payroll amount multiplied by their income tax rate for that year. In order for an employee's compensation to qualify for this treatment, the employee must work on alternative energy-related research, development or manufacturing and have a regular place of employment within the NextEnergy Zone. If the credit exceeds the tax liability of the business for the tax year, the portion of the credit exceeding the tax liability will be refunded. This credit initially took effect beginning in 2003 and was scheduled to expire at the end of 2007 with the repeal of MCL § 208.39e. In 2007 however, it was renewed as part of a larger reworking of state business taxing policy.<br> <br> The NextEnergy Authority legislation was amended in 2006 by [http://www.legislature.mi.gov/documents/2005-2006/publicact/pdf/2006-PA-0632.pdf SB 583], which expanded the definitions relating to alternative energy technologies. Eligible alternative energy technologies include: fuel cells, PV, biomass, solar thermal heating and cooling, wind energy, CHP, microturbines, miniturbines, Stirling engines, electricity storage systems, and clean fuel energy systems powered by methane, natural gas, methanol, ethanol, or hydrogen. See MCL § 207.822 for a complete listing of eligible technologies.<br> <br> NextEnergy is a comprehensive economic-development plan to position Michigan as a world leader in the research, development, commercialization and manufacture of alternative-energy technologies. NextEnergy was created to address the risks of continued dependence on foreign energy resources, to mitigate increasing environmental concerns, and to prepare for the possibility of technologies that may replace the internal combustion engine.<br> <br> The Michigan Strategic Fund designated the NextEnergy Zone a Renaissance Zone in 2002. Businesses located within this zone may also be eligible for additional tax benefits. Contact the NextEnergy Center for more information. The NextEnergy Zone, located in Detroit at Wayne State University Research and Technology Park, is home of the 40,000-square-foot NextEnergy Center. The center includes laboratory facilities, business incubator space, collaborative meeting space and other facilities that will support Michigan’s alternative-energy industry.
    rt Michigan’s alternative-energy industry.  +
  • '''''Note: '''''''The eligibility requirem
    '''''Note: '''''''The eligibility requirement was revised in October 2013 which requires large fuel cell systems to provide grid independent operating to priority loads** during periods of grid outage.'' Under PON 2157 The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) offers incentives for the purchase, installation, and operation of customer sited tier (CST, also called "behind the meter") fuel cell systems used for electricity production. Because such systems will help fulfill the CST component of the state RPS requirement, eligibility for incentives is generally limited to customers who pay the RPS surcharge on their electricity bills. Exceptions to this rule may be made on a case-by-case basis for projects that demonstrate significant public benefits consistent with program objectives. There are no minimum or maximum size limits for projects, though incentives will generally be granted only for installed capacity not exceeding the customer's electrical load. Exceptions to this rule may be made on a case-by-case basis and participants are permitted to install excess capacity at their own expense.<br> <br> Incentive levels and limitations vary by system size. Bonus capacity incentives are available for large projects that provide secure/standalone capability at sites of Essential Public Services (e.g., police stations, hospitals, public utilities). Performance incentives can be received for up to 3 years for systems with an annual capacity factor of 50% or greater. The total value of incentives is capped at $50,000 for systems of up to 25 kilowatts (kW) and at $1 million for larger systems. The incentive amounts offered for different types of systems are as follows:<br> <br> '''Basic Capacity Incentive''': Large systems only, $1,000/kW up to $200,000 per project site<br> <br> '''Bonus Capacity Incentive''': Large systems only, $500/kW up to $100,000 per project site<br> <br> '''Performance Incentive''': $0.15 per net kWh, up to $20,000 per project site per year for small systems and $300,000 per project site per year for large systems.<br> <br> Projects will receive the first half of the basic capacity payment upon system installation and the remaining portion plus any bonus incentives after the system has been commissioned and approved by NYSERDA. The capacity factor for the performance incentive will be determined annually by dividing the net system output by the theoretical maximum output (rated capacity times 8,760 hours/year). The performance incentive will be disbursed annually after performance data have been collected.<br> <br> All systems, regardless of size, must be new and listed as an eligible fuel cell system by NYSERDA and are subject to post-installation inspection. All systems must have performance monitoring capability and systems larger than 25 kW are required to have high-grade monitoring and sensor equipment (e.g., revenue grade fuel and electricity meters) and remote data collection capability. Owners of small systems must report manually collected data at least every three months to NYSERDA.<br> <br> Ownership of renewable energy credits (RECs) associated with system electricity production is not specifically addressed. However, the program rules do specify that attributes associated with electricity production by supported systems will be reported as part of the CST of the state RPS program for the life of the system, and participants are prohibited from entering into any transactions which would export energy outside of New York State. In cases where the system is fueled by landfill gas, biogas, or anaerobic digester gas*, methane destruction credits are considered separate from electric power based RPS attributes and may be retained by the owner.<br> <br> <br> ''*Fuel cell systems fueled exclusively by anaerobic digester gas (ADG) must apply first to the ''[http://www.dsireusa.org/library/includes/incentive2.cfm?Incentive_Code=NY39F&state=NY&CurrentPageID=1&RE=1&EE=1 ''NYSERDA ADG-to-Electricity Rebate and Performance Incentive'']'' program. Such systems are only eligible under the fuel cell program when funds for the dedicated anaerobic digester incentives have been depleted.'' ** ''Priority loads are defined as any load that provides health, safety, and/or economic benefit to the project side, including lighting, space conditioning, food storage, communication and orderly shutdown of industrial process. ''
    orderly shutdown of industrial process. ''  +
  • '''''Note: After a 2 year moratorium on al
    '''''Note: After a 2 year moratorium on all state tax credits, this credit may be claimed for tax year 2012 and subsequent tax years, for eligible expenditures on or after July 1, 2012.''''' Oklahoma allows a contractor who is the primary builder of an energy efficient home or manufactured home substantially completed after December 31, 2005 to claim an income tax credit beginning in tax year 2006. The home must be under 2,000 square feet. Improvements eligible for the credit include energy efficient heating and cooling systems, windows, doors, roofs and insulation to minimize heat loss and gain. The contractor can take a tax credit for the amount of the eligible expenditures, not to exceed $2,000 for a home that is between 20% and 39% above the International Energy Conservation Code 2003 or $4,000 for a home that is 40% or above of the Code. In addition, the heating and cooling efficiencies must meet the minimum requirements established by the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987 and building envelope improvements must account for a certain percentage of the reduced annual heating and cooling energy consumption levels. The contractor can carryover any unused portion of the tax credit for up to four subsequent years. As the result of a 2006 amendment, credits earned after August 25, 2006 are freely transferable to any taxpayer upon the filing of a transfer agreement.
    r upon the filing of a transfer agreement.  +
  • '''''Note: After a 2 year moratorium on al
    '''''Note: After a 2 year moratorium on all state tax credits, this credit may be claimed for tax year 2012 and subsequent tax years, for eligible expenditures on or after July 1, 2012.''''' Oklahoma allows a contractor who is the primary builder of an energy efficient home or manufactured home substantially completed after December 31, 2005 to claim an income tax credit beginning in tax year 2006. The home must be under 2,000 square feet. Improvements eligible for the credit include energy efficient heating and cooling systems, windows, doors, roofs and insulation to minimize heat loss and gain. The contractor can take a tax credit for the amount of the eligible expenditures, not to exceed $2,000 for a home that is between 20% and 39% above the International Energy Conservation Code 2003 or $4,000 for a home that is 40% or above of the Code. In addition, the heating and cooling efficiencies must meet the minimum requirements established by the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987 and building envelope improvements must account for a certain percentage of the reduced annual heating and cooling energy consumption levels. The contractor can carryover any unused portion of the tax credit for up to four subsequent years. As the result of a 2006 amendment, credits earned after August 25, 2006 are freely transferable to any taxpayer upon the filing of a transfer agreement.
    r upon the filing of a transfer agreement.  +
  • '''''Note: Alameda Municipal Power had a b
    '''''Note: Alameda Municipal Power had a budget of $4.2 million to support this program. The utility has allocated the full budget and is no longer accepting applications. The information below is provided for historical purposes. ''''' Alameda Municipal Power offers an incentive program to customers who install solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. Rebates will be provided to commercial and residential customers on a per-watt AC basis, which, in keeping with the terms of the [http://www.dsireusa.org/library/includes/incentive2.cfm?Incentive_Code=CA134F&state=CA&CurrentPageID=1&RE=1&EE=0 California Solar Initiative], will decline over the life of the program according to a 10-year schedule. Each succeeding year has a lower incentive amount and a higher maximum aggregate capacity for installations. For 2015, the rebate level is $1.68 per watt for systems less than 50 kilowatts (kW). Over the life of the program, Alameda Municipal Power has a goal of 2,127 kW of new solar capacity. The full 10-year incentive declination schedule can be found on the web site above.<br> <br> Additional restrictions and eligibility requirements apply.
    ctions and eligibility requirements apply.  +
  • '''''Note: All available 2014 funds are fu
    '''''Note: All available 2014 funds are fully subscribed and the 2014 program is closed to new applications.''''' El Paso Electric (EPE) offers rebates to both residential and non-residential customers that install photovoltaic (PV) systems on homes or buildings. Rebates are offered at a flat rate of $0.75 per watt-DC for both residential and non-residential customers. <br> <br> Residential systems are limited to a $7,500 incentive, and non-residential systems are limited to a $37,500 incentive. Rebates may be assigned to the customer, a service provider, or a third party. The 2014 program budget is $402,000 ($212,500 for residential and $189,500 for non-residential). Past program budgets were: $141,300 (2010), $1,350,000 (2011), $1,150,000 (2012), and $425,000 (2013). EPE claims ownership of renewable energy certificates (RECs) produced by systems that receive incentives. '''Eligibility ''' Individual systems must be sized between 1 kilowatt (kW) and 50 kW (per [http://legiscan.com/TX/text/SB1910/id/304167/Texas-2011-SB1910-Enrolled.html S.B. 1910], which came into effect June 2011) to be eligible for the incentive. In addition, systems may not be sized to produce energy in excess of that required to meet annual on-site energy consumption. Customers may only apply for one rebate per point of service, as defined by a unique meter ESI-ID number. Customers with multiple points of service are therefore permitted to apply for multiple rebates, subject to other program requirements. Systems must be new, connected to the grid on the customer side of the meter, meet minimum estimated performance requirements (80% of optimum), and meet all applicable code and utility interconnection requirements. All equipment (i.e., modules, inverters, and meters) must meet standard quality and safety requirements (e.g., inverters must certified under UL-1741 or its equivalent). All installations must be performed by service providers who meet program eligibility requirements. Service providers are also subject to ongoing quality assurance standards and are required to attend technical training sessions. Installations may be subject to a variety of inspection and performance monitoring requirements in the short- and long-term. Special considerations and rules may apply to new construction projects, apartments, rentals, condominiums, leased properties, large companies, and government agencies. Interested parties are encouraged to contact the program manager prior to submitting an application.
    anager prior to submitting an application.  +
  • '''''Note: All funding has currently been
    '''''Note: All funding has currently been reserved for 2014 and new applications are no longer being accepted. See Gulf Power's [http://www.gulfpower.com/residential/earthcents/renewable-energy/solar-pv.cshtml Solar PV web site] for more information.''''' '''''On November 25th. 2014 the Florida PSC voted to end a solar pilot program at the end of 2015 that requires independently owned utilities to offer solar rebates. This program will not be offered after December 31st, 2015.''''' Gulf Power offers a Solar PV rebate to residential and commercial customers. Gulf Power will provide a $2/watt rebate with a $10,000 per system maximum.<br> <br> In addition, Gulf Power has a Solar for Schools program, providing capital funding for PV systems. Gulf Power has worked with the Florida Solar Energy Center to install several 4-kW systems at Florida schools. The program is funded with voluntary contributions and includes educational programs to teach students about solar energy.
    rams to teach students about solar energy.  +
  • '''''Note: All program funding has been fu
    '''''Note: All program funding has been fully allocated, and reservations are no longer being accepted. At this time, there are no plans for future solar or wind rebates.''''' <b><u>History</u></b> In June 2005, Maine enacted legislation (L.D. 1586) creating a rebate program for photovoltaic (PV) systems and solar-thermal systems installed at homes or businesses. Legislation enacted in April 2008 (L.D. 2283) extended the program to grid-tied wind-energy systems installed after January 1, 2009. The Maine Public Utilities Commission (PUC) developed rules to implement the program. Rebates for PV and solar-thermal installations were unavailable for 2009. However, the governor signed legislation (L.D. 220) in early May 2009 directing the Maine Public Utilities Commission (PUC) to utilize funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) to increase this rebate program by $500,000 per fiscal years 2009-10 and 2010-11. This legislation also required the PUC to amend the rules in order to create performance standards for solar and wind energy systems and to require applicants to calculate a simple payback period as part of the application process. In September 2009, Maine passed a large energy bill called the "Act Regarding Maine's Energy Future" ([http://www.mainelegislature.org/legis/bills/bills_124th/chapters/PUBLIC372.asp H.P. 1038]). This legislation transfers all of the funding and programs over to the Efficiency Maine Trust. Legislation enacted in June 2011 ([http://www.mainelegislature.org/legis/bills/bills_125th/chapters/PUBLIC314.asp HB 568]) fixes a legislative glitch with the rebate program (a result of the Act Regarding Maine's Energy Future, the program was allowed to sunset on December 31, 2010) and directs Efficiency Maine to establish new rules for the rebate program, which it did in November 2011 as part of its Renewable Resource Fund Regulations. The rebate program has been historically funded by an assessment on the state's transmission and distribution utilities. A total of $500,000 in funding has been available for rebates annually. Of this sum, the Public Utilities Commission had allocated traditionally 60% to rebates for solar-thermal systems, 20% to rebates for PV systems, and 20% to rebates for wind-energy systems. During fiscal years 2010 and 2011, this rebate program was increased by $500,000 per year with money allocated from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Funding for FY2012 of approximately $1,000,000 was approved in September 2011 and the traditional allocations are no longer applicable. (See the 2012 [http://www.efficiencymaine.com/docs/reports/2012-Annual-Report.pdf Efficiency Maine Annual Report] for more information.)
    aine Annual Report] for more information.)  +
  • '''''Note: All program funds are already d
    '''''Note: All program funds are already dispersed for 2014, but applicants can still apply for a rebate for 2015. ''''' Poudre Valley REC is providing rebates to their residential customers who install photovoltaic (PV) systems on their homes. Before receiving a rebate, applicants must have an energy audit of their home that includes a blower door test. The audit must be completed by a RESNET or BPI-certified auditor. Recipient’s homes must have minimum insulation levels of R-38 for attics and ceilings, R- 13 for walls, and R-10 for footer and foundation insulation. Poudre Valley REC has limited funding for this program and awards rebates on a first-come, first served basis until the funding is exhausted. Applications for future funding are encouraged and will be placed in a queue in the order received.
    e placed in a queue in the order received.  +
  • '''''Note: All three utilities have reache
    '''''Note: All three utilities have reached their budget limits for residential installations are no longer accepting applications. Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) has also reached its budget limit for non-residential systems and is no longer accepting applications. As of November 2014, San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E) and Southern California Edison (SCE) are nearing their budget limits for non-residential systems. Click [http://www.csi-trigger.com/ here] for the current status for each utility. ''''' In January 2006, the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) adopted a program -- the California Solar Initiative (CSI) -- to provide more than $2.3 billion in incentives for photovoltaic (PV) projects with the objective of adding 1,940 megawatts (MW) of solar capacity by 2016. The CSI includes the general market program (described here), the [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=CA205F&re=0&ee=0 Single-family Affordable Solar Housing (SASH) program] and the [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=CA186F&re=0&ee=0 Multifamily Affordable Solar Housing (MASH) program]. The CSI is one element of the greater [http://www.gosolarcalifornia.ca.gov Go Solar Californi Campaign], which includes the ''[http://www.dsireusa.org/library/includes/incentive2.cfm?Incentive_Code=CA150F&state=CA&CurrentPageID=1&RE=1&EE=1 New Solar Homes Partnership] ''and the incentives offered by the Publicly Owned Utilities, and which has a total target of 3,000 MW of new solar capacity by 2016. General Market CSI incentive levels automatically step down over the duration of the program in 10 steps based on the aggregate capacity of solar installed. In this way, incentive reductions are linked to levels of solar demand rather than an arbitrary timetable. '''Expected Performance-Based Buydowns for systems under 30 kW''' began in 2007 at $2.50/W AC for residential and commercial systems (adjusted based on expected performance) and $3.25/W AC for government entities and nonprofits (adjusted based on expected performance). The incentive levels decline as the aggregate capacity of PV installations increases. Incentives will be awarded as a one-time, up-front payment based on expected performance, which is [http://www.csi-epbb.com/ calculated] using equipment ratings and installation factors such as geographic location, tilt, orientation and shading. Click [http://www.csi-trigger.com/ here] for current incentive levels for each utility. Systems under 30 kW also have the option of opting for a performance-based incentive rather than the incentive based on expected performance.<br> <br> '''Performance-Based Incentives (PBI) for systems 30 kW and larger''' began in 2007 at $0.39/kWh for the first five years for taxable entities, and $$0.50/kWh for the first five years for government entities and nonprofits. The incentive levels decline as the aggregate capacity of PV installations increases. PBI will be paid monthly based on the actual amount of energy produced for a period of five years. Residential and small commercial projects under the 30 kW threshold can also choose to opt in to the PBI rather than the upfront Expected Performance-Based Buydown approach. However, all installations of 30 kW or larger must take the PBI. Click [http://www.csi-trigger.com/ here] for current incentive levels for each utility<br> <br> The program is managed by the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E), Southern California Edison (SCE), and the Center for Sustainable Energy.<br> <br> '''<u>Incentives for Other Solar Electric Generating Technologies</u>'''<br> The CSI Handbook released in January 2008 clarified the eligibility of other solar electric generating technologies which either produce electricity or displace electricity. Incentives for other solar electric generating technologies are available for CSI incentives effective October 1, 2008. The CPUC specifically recognizes electric generating solar thermal as including dish stirling, solar trough, and concentrating solar technologies, while technologies that displace electricity include solar forced air heating, and solar cooling or air conditioning. The budget for electric displacing technologies is capped at $100.8 million. While solar water heaters can also displace electricity, the CPUC excludes them from the CSI because they incentives for solar water heaters through a separate program.<br> <br> <br> '''CSI Program Administrators:'''<br> <br> '''Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E)'''<br> Web Site: [http://www.pge.com/solar www.pge.com/solar]<br> E-mail Address: [mailto:solar@pge.com solar@pge.com]<br> Contact Person: Program Manager, California Solar Initiative Program<br> Telephone: 877-743-4112<br> <br> '''Center for Sustainable Energy (CSE) (on behalf of SDG&E)'''<br> Web Site: [http://www.energycenter.org www.energycenter.org]<br> E-mail Address: [mailto:csi@energycenter.org csi@energycenter.org]<br> Contact Person: Program Manager<br> Telephone: 858-244-1177<br> <br> '''Southern California Edison (SCE)'''<br> Web Site: [http://www.sce.com/solarleadership/gosolar/california-solar-initiative/default.htm http://www.sce.com/solarleadership/gosolar/california-solar-initiative/default.htm]<br> E-mail Address: [mailto:greenh@sce.com greenh@sce.com]<br> Contact Person: Program Manager, California Solar Initiative Program<br> Telephone: 1-800-799-4177<br>
    r> Telephone: 1-800-799-4177<br>  +
  • '''''Note: Applications for 2013 were acce
    '''''Note: Applications for 2013 were accepted during a two-week period from January 15 to 5:00 PM through January 28, 2013. The program is now closed through the remainder of 2013. <br> ''''' Rocky Mountain Power's Solar Incentive Program has a total budget of $50 million for calendar years 2013 through 2017. That budget is divided between program years and program sectors (residential, small non-residential, and large non-residential). Eligible systems must be net-metered, and the statewide maximum system size for net-metered systems is 25 kilowatts (kW) for residential and 2 MW for non-residential. Participants in this program may size their systems up to the maximums allowed by net metering, but incentives will be restricted based on the sizes referenced below. The incentive amount available to each program sector is designed to step down every year according to the following schedule: {
    {  +
  • '''''Note: Applications for the OHH Change
    '''''Note: Applications for the OHH Change-Out Pilot Program will be accepted through February 22, 2013. After this time, check the program web site for information regarding future solicitations.''''' The Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) and the Department of Energy Resources (DOER) are offering the Commonwealth Outdoor Hydronic Heater (OHH) Change-Out Pilot Program to replace older or improperly operated OHH systems (also known as outdoor wood boilers). For the purposes of this program, the definition of an OHH is a fuel burning device designed to burn wood or other approved solid fuels as an outdoor installation (or installed in a structure not meant for human occupation) which heats a building and/or water. The program provides funding for the replacement of older or improperly operated OHH systems based, with a focus on systems that: <ul><li>demonstrate a threat to public health and safety <li>proximity of the system to other properties, or to sensitive populations <li>population density of the area <li>have demonstrated past operation of the existing unit in accordance with state regulations <li>are replaceable with a Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP) approved system, or a system with air quality improvement</ul> Other criteria may be considered. Projects must owned by commercial, agricultural, or residential entities served by one of the investor-owned electric distribution utilities in Massachusetts -- Fitchburg Gas and Electric Light (Unitil), Massachusetts Electric (National Grid), Nantucket Electric (National Grid), NSTAR Electric, or Western Massachusetts Electric. In addition, customers of any Municipal Light Plant (MLP) Department that pays into the RET are eligible (Ashburnham, Holden, Holyoke, Russel, and Templeton). Replacement systems meet all local Board of Health requirements, all Massachusetts Air Quality regulations, and either listed on the MassDEP web site or demonstrate an equal or greater air quality improvement to the listed systems. Systems may not be operated in such a way that causes air pollution or other nuisance, and must be operated in such a way that is in compliance with all local regulations. Systems must also be sized appropriate for the application. See the program web site or use the contact below for application materials and further information regarding system requirements and eligibility.
    rding system requirements and eligibility.  +
  • '''''Note: Applications for the most recen
    '''''Note: Applications for the most recent round of funding from the New Jersey Combined Heat and Power Program were due June 30, 2006. The information below describes incentives available through that date. The New Jersey Clean Energy Program anticipates that more program funding will be available in the future. Check the New Jersey Clean Energy Program web site periodically for additional information.''''' The New Jersey Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Program provides incentives that vary based on CHP technology, type, project size and total project cost. To qualify, a facility must be located in New Jersey, and the customer must be a contributor to the Societal Benefits Charge fund. Incentives are paid out only up to one megawatt (MW) of capacity. There is no minimum project size. Any portion of a customer's load that is committed to an interruptible or peak load reduction program is not eligible for incentives. However, these customers can seek incentives for generation capacity to cover their uncommitted load. Qualifying fuel cells not fueled by a "Class I" renewable fuel are eligible for an incentive of $4.00 per watt, not to exceed 60% of a project's cost. Qualifying microturbines, internal combustion engines and gas combustion engines are eligible for an incentive of $1.00 per watt, not to exceed 30% of a project's cost. Qualifying electric-generating systems utilizing heat recovery or other mechanical recovery are eligible for an incentive of $0.50 per watt, not to exceed 30% of a project's cost. Used, refurbished, temporary, pilot, demonstration and back-up generation do not qualify for incentives under this program. Systems or equipment that use diesel fuel, oil or coal for start-up or continuous operations also are not eligible. CHP systems must achieve an average annual fuel efficiency of at least 60%, based on total energy input and total utilized energy output. Mechanical energy may be included in the efficiency evaluation. In addition, systems should have the ability to island (disconnect) from the utility in the event of substantial grid congestion or failure. Systems installed must be covered by a five-year warranty or a five-year service contract. See the program web site for additional details. Contact your gas utility for more information and additional program requirements: * Elizabethtown Gas - (800) 221-0364 * PSE&G - (973) 430-7886 * NJ Natural Gas - (732) 919-8133 * South Jersey Gas - (609) 561-9000 ext. 4271
    outh Jersey Gas - (609) 561-9000 ext. 4271  +
  • '''''Note: Applications must be submitted
    '''''Note: Applications must be submitted by 5 PM December 8, 2014.''''' The Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation and The Wisconsin Department of Administration are offering private sector businesses eligible for low interest loans up to $1,000,000 from the CERLF for projects that fulfill any of the following objectives: * Increasing energy efficiency through the reduction of industrial/manufacturing facility use of fossil fuels * Eliminating or reducing waste products through conversion to feedstock for energy production * Producing biogas The loan will carry an interest rate of 2% from date of disbursement up to seven years or life expectancy of the equipment being finances, whichever is less. Match must be at least 51% of Total Project Cost. The envrionmental Impact of the project is considered. Other cost-effective energy reduction or clean energy projects will also be considered for funding through the '''$7 million CERLF fund'''. Visit the program website for details on how to apply.
    ogram website for details on how to apply.  +
  • '''''Note: As of August 18, 2010 the porti
    '''''Note: As of August 18, 2010 the portion of this program devoted to eligible electric customers is now fully subscribed and applications are no longer being accepting. It is not clear whether this program will continue with additional funding in the future. The portion devoted to gas customers remains open.''''' The New Jersey Office of Clean Energy (OCE) has initiated a pilot program providing rebates to eligible state residents for the purchase and installation of domestic solar water heating systems. Rebates are only available for systems that replace, retrofit, or supplement an existing gas or electric water heater in single-family residential homes. The designation "gas" includes customers that currently use propane for their water heating needs. Participants in the New Jersey Energy Star Homes, Home Performance with Energy Star, Weatherization Assistance, or other OCE programs are not eligible for incentives. It is also important to note that certain program rules and requirements are differ between electric customers and gas customers. The rebate is set at a flat rate of $1,200 per system. In addition, all systems and components must be new; have an OG-300 rating from the Solar Rating and Certification Corporation (SRCC); and come with a variety of manufacturer and installation warranties. All installations must be performed by program participating contractors that possess a New Jersey Home Improvement Contractor's (HIC) License. Contractors must also be NABCEP certified or have prior industry experience coupled with accredited training. The program website contains a list of eligible solar water heating systems and participating contractors. Due to different equipment requirements, the list of eligible solar water heaters for electric customers differs from that for gas customers. In order to claim the incentive, participants must submit their rebate within 120 days of purchasing the system for systems with electric back-up and within 60 days for systems with gas back-up. Rebates can either be issued to the customer or assigned to the contractor. Completed systems may be subject to inspection or monitoring by program personnel. It is important to that while renewable energy certificate ownership is not directly addressed by program documents, solar water heating system '''are not eligible''' to generate Solar Renewable Energy Certificates (SRECs) for use under the state renewable portfolio standard (RPS).
    state renewable portfolio standard (RPS).  +
  • '''''Note: As of August 25, 2014, Black Hi
    '''''Note: As of August 25, 2014, Black Hills Energy had reserved 275 kW out of 343.4 kW available for the Small Program. As of August 26, 2014, Black Hills Energy had fully subscribed the Medium Program for systems greater than 30 kW, but only 225.6 kW of 240.2 kW available for systems more than 10 kW but less than 30 kW had been reserved. ''''' Black Hills Energy has a performance-based incentive (PBI) for photovoltaic (PV) systems up to 100 kilowatts (kW) in capacity. In exchange for a PBI, Black Hills Energy earns the renewable energy credits (RECs) associated with the PV-generated electricity for a period of time. '''Small Program (10 kW or less) ''' PV systems 10 kW or less will receive a PBI of $0.1267 per kilowatt-hour (kWh). While systems between 5 kW and 10 kW are allowed to participate in the program and net meter, they will only receive the PBI based on 5 kW. '''Medium Program (>10 kW but <100 kW)''' Systems larger than 10 kW and up to 100 kW will receive a PBI of $0.16 per kWh. PBI payments are made annually for a period of 10 years. '''Terms''' All incentive payments are subject to the availability of funds and a pre-installation site inspection. Black Hills Energy has established participation caps for each tier. The status of funding availability for each tier is available on the website above. PV installations are subject to on-site supervision by a NABCEP certified professional to maintain a 3:1 ratio for the installation crew (one certified installer for every three solar installers). See program web site for complete details.
    See program web site for complete details.  +
  • '''''Note: As of August 30, 2013, LIPA has
    '''''Note: As of August 30, 2013, LIPA has suspended the Solar Pioneer Residential Program. However, the utility plans to reopen the program on September 23 with $5 million pledged by New York State. See the web site above for more information. The summary below describes the program as it was in effect before the residential program was suspended. ''''' LIPA offers its customers rebates for grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems as part of the Solar Pioneer and Solar Entrepreneur programs. Residential PV systems up to 25 kW and non-residential PV systems up to 2 MW (the limits of LIPA's [http://www.dsireusa.org/library/includes/incentive2.cfm?Incentive_Code=NY14R&state=NY&CurrentPageID=1&RE=1&EE=1 net metering] policy) are eligible for an incentive based on expected system performance, ranging from base level of $1.45 - $2.25 per watt (CEC-AC) depending on the customer sector. The incentive amount is also adjusted for shading, array orientations, and other factors affecting performance based on a calculation of a "Design Factor" (%) that compares the system in question to an optimal reference system. The program has historically only been available for customer-owned systems, rendering third-party owned systems ineligible for incentives. However, the program rules have recently been changed to allow residential systems installed under third-party ownership arrangements (i.e., power purchase agreements or leases) to qualify for incentives.<br> <br> Systems should generally be sized so as not to exceed annual electricity consumption. Rebate amounts will be limited to the amount dictated by a system sized to produce no more than 105% of on-site electricity consumption during the prior 12 months. LIPA's rebates are designed to reflect the current PV costs. The rebate may not exceed the lesser of 50% of installed system costs for residential and business-owned systems, 65% for municipal and non-profit systems, or the incentive value as determined by the rebate schedule. The installed costs are defined as the PV system cost to the customer minus any government grants or subsidies.<br> <br> The most recently published rebate levels offered by the program are as follows: * Residential (general customer-owned): $1.86/watt CEC-AC up to the lesser of 50% of installed costs or $18,600 * Residential (third-party owned): $1.72/watt CEC-AC up to the lesser of 50% of installed costs or $17,200 * Residential (non-profit owned): $2.25/watt CEC-AC up to the lesser of 65% of installed costs or $22,500 * Commercial: $1.45/watt CEC-AC up to the lesser of 50% of installed costs or $145,000 * Gov't, Schools, Nonprofits: $2.25/watt CEC-AC up to the lesser of 65% of installed costs or $225,000 Schools, not for profit, and government facilities receive higher rebates to help compensate for tax incentives available to residential and commercial customers. For the additional incentive, proof of non profit (501(c)3) or equivalent status is required and tax credits/depreciation cannot be applied for the PV installation. All equipment must meet the minimum technical, warranty, and installation requirements established by LIPA. The program has a $100 non-refundable application fee.<br> <br> '''History'''<br> LIPA launched the Solar Pioneer Program in 2000 as part of the utility's five-year Clean Energy Initiative -- a $32 million commitment to developing clean energy alternatives. In May 2003, LIPA announced that it would extend its Clean Energy Initiative for another five years and increase funding levels by $5 million per year, to an annual investment of $37 million and a total investment of $185 million. Under the Efficiency Long Island Program (which replaces the Clean Energy Initiative) budgets have exceeded this investment level, with total efficiency and renewables budget of $120 million for 2013.<br> <br> In recent years the solar rebate program has been expanded with the addition of rebates for large commercial systems. The large commercial program is called the Solar Entrepreneur program. With the addition of the Solar Entrepreneur program, the overall program budget has increased dramatically, to more than $28 million in 2013. LIPA has reportedly issued rebates for more than 3,300 PV systems over the 10-year life of the program. Past reports indicate an average PV system size of approximately 5.9 kW.
    ge PV system size of approximately 5.9 kW.  +
  • '''''Note: As of May 2, 2012, NYSERDA is n
    '''''Note: As of May 2, 2012, NYSERDA is no longer accepting Incentive Reservation Forms (IRFs). Owners that submitted an IRF prior to this date but did not receive an approval notice will be placed on a wait list, and will be notified if additional funding becomes available.'''''<br> The Green Residential Building Program, administered by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA), offers incentives to residential building owners for the construction or substantial renovation of buildings that are built or permanently sited in New York State and meet certain green building requirements. The program is available to owners of buildings with 1 - 11 residential dwelling units that meet the minimum green building requirements and have a Certificate of Occupancy or Certification of Completion dated between January 1, 2010 and October 30, 2013. An eligible building owner may be the developer or builder if the developer or builder holds title to the building on the date a Certificate of Occupancy is issued. The definition of what constitutes a substantial renovation is detailed, but in basic terms requires a whole building approach that involves building envelope improvements, installation or replacement of at least two of three major building systems (electrical, plumbing, and HVAC), and equipment (e.g., lighting, appliances) that meet or exceed program efficiency requirements. Incentives under the program are offered at up to $3.75 per qualified occupied square foot but are capped according to the number of units in the building. Maximum incentives range from $5,125 for single family dwellings, up to $13,375 for an 11-unit multi-family residential dwelling. Building owners may receive up to $120,000 through the program per calendar year. In order to qualify for incentives, buildings must meet the following requirements: * Certification at the Silver level or higher, using the National Green Building Standard, or either the LEED for Homes or LEED for New Construction Rating Systems. * Energy-efficient lighting and appliances must achieve at least 500 kWh of annual electric saving per dwelling unit * Combustion appliances must have been tested for operational safety * For low-rise (3 or fewer stories) with 4 or fewer dwelling units (including detached single family homes and townhouses), buildings must meet additional requirements for HERS rating, ventilation, HVAC system efficiency, and water heater efficiency. Builders or contractors of residential green homes must have prior green building experience, hold professional certification in green building, or have completed a green building professional training course approved by NYSERDA. Owners apply for incentives once the building is substantially completed, a Certificate of Occupancy or a Certificate of Completion is issued, and the building has been certified under one of the qualified rating programs. The program is funded by money raised through the auction of carbon emission allowances under the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI). Applications will be accepted on a first-come, first-served basis through October 30, 2013 or until program funding is exhausted. The most recent NYSERDA RGGI Operating Plan does not contain specific levels of future funding for the program, but does indicate an intent to provide up to $2 million annually if sufficient revenue from emission auctions is available. Please visit the program web site or contact program managers for additional information.
    ogram managers for additional information.  +
  • '''''Note: As of May 23, 2014, no resident
    '''''Note: As of May 23, 2014, no residential funds are available for the tax credit in years 2014, 2015, or 2016, and no commercial funds are available for the tax credit in 2014. Commercial funds for 2015 and 2016 are still available. ''''' S.B. 463, enacted in April 2007, established a personal tax credit and a corporate tax credit for sustainable buildings in New Mexico. The tax credits apply to both commercial and residential buildings. Commercial buildings which have been registered and certified by the US Green Building Council at LEED Silver or higher for new construction (NC), existing buildings (EB), core and shell (CS), or commercial interiors (CI) are eligible for a tax credit. The amount of the credit varies according to the square footage of the building and the level of certification achieved, as indicated on the following chart:<br> <br> '''Commercial Buildings:''' {
    {  +
  • '''''Note: California voters approved [htt
    '''''Note: California voters approved [http://vig.cdn.sos.ca.gov/2012/general/pdf/text-proposed-laws-v2.pdf#nameddest=prop39 Ballot Proposition 39] in November 2012. The new law closes a tax loophole, which is expected to provide $1 billion in additional revenue every year. According to the law, half of the new funding collected in the first five years must be used for renewable energy and energy efficiency projects at schools and public facilities, workforce development, and providing assitance to local governments in establishing and implementing PACE programs. It is unclear at this time how the new funding will be allocated. ''''' On December 14, 2005, California’s governor signed Executive Order S-20-04, creating a Green Building Action Plan to improve the energy performance of all state buildings and reduce grid-based energy usage in state buildings by 20% of 2003 levels by 2015. Under this order, all new and renovated buildings must be rated to at least the “Silver” level of LEED standards. EO S-20-04 also requires agencies to seek out office space leases in buildings with the Energy Star rating for spaces of 5,000 square feet or more, to identify the most appropriate ways of achieving energy efficiency in their buildings, and to purchase ENERGY STAR products when cost effective. A later Executive Order (B-18-12), signed in April of 2012, updated some of these requirements while rescinding the earlier Executive Order. It adjusted the energy savings targets such that grid-based energy purchases must be reduced by 20% by 2018 using 2003 as a baseline. New state buildings and major renovations started after 2025 must be constructed to be zero net energy, while 50% of existing square footage must be in the process of achieving zero net energy by 2025. Additionally, new buildings or major renovations larger than 10,000 square feet must earn the "Silver" level of LEED certification and incorporate on-site renewable energy if economically feasible. California has additional legislation (GC14710-14714) requiring the identification of public buildings where it is feasible to reduce energy consumption, achieve energy efficiencies, produce onsite electrical generation, or reduce the level of peak electricity consumption using alternative energy equipment, thermal energy storage technologies, or cogeneration equipment. In addition, [http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/pub/07-08/bill/asm/ab_0501-0550/ab_532_bill_20071013_chaptered.pdf A.B. 532] of 2007 extended a requirement specifically for solar energy equipment to be installed on state buildings. The law required solar water heaters and photovoltaics to be installed on any public building, parking facility, or state-owned swimming pool by January 1, 2009, where such an installation is determined to be cost-effective over the life of the system and funding is available. Additionally, the law requires solar energy equipment must be installed, when feasible, on any new public building or parking facility constructed after January 1, 2008. Click here for more information about solar installed on public buildings.
    about solar installed on public buildings.  +
  • '''''Note: Check the program web site for
    '''''Note: Check the program web site for application materials and information on future solicitations. Consumers Energy is not currently accepting applications for Residential and Non-Residential EARP Solar customers. Future phases are planned into 2015 as needed to meet program capacity targets. Consumers Energy is not currently accepting applications to the Anaerobic Digestion program.''''' The Experimental Advanced Renewable Energy Program (EARP) offers Consumers Energy residential and non-residential customers a buy-back tariff program for electricity produced by solar photovoltaic (PV) systems and anaeorobic digestion. The pilot version of the program began in 2009 and closed in December 2010, but an expanded version of the program has extended into 2015. Owners of residential systems from 1-20 kilowatt (kW) and non-residential systems from 1-150 kW are eligible to participate in the program. Residential customers must receive electric service on tariff rate RS or RT in order to be eligible for the program. Non-residential customers on tariff rates RS, RT, GS, GSD, GP, and GPD are eligible for the program. The expanded program is capped at 3,000 kW of capacity, with 1,500 kW for residential systems and 1,500 kW for non-residential systems. Contracts will be awarded in phases, with 125 kW available each quarter for residential customers, and 250 kW available for non-residential customers every six months. It is important to note that this is not a net metering program and program participants are not eligible for net metering. Under the program, Consumers Energy will purchase all of the electricity produced by the system through a fixed-rate contract of up to 15 years. Contracts will be 15 years in length, but may not have a termination date of later than August 31, 2029. Electricity production is metered separately from the customer's existing electricity source (i.e., the grid). Participants are assessed a monthly System Access Charge equivalent to the existing distribution account used to qualify for the program to cover metering costs.* Systems with battery back-up or any other type of energy storage capability are not eligible to participate in this program. In order to be eligible for the program, solar equipment must be manufactured in Michigan or constructed by a Michigan workforce (detailed requirements are available on the program web site). The solicitation phases and purchase rates are as follows: {
    {  +
  • '''''Note: Connecticut's 2013 Budget Bill,
    '''''Note: Connecticut's 2013 Budget Bill, enacted in June 2013, transfers a total of $25.4 million out of the Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority into the General Fund - $6.2 million in FY 2014 and $19.2 million in FY 2015.''''' Connecticut's 1998 electric restructuring legislation (Public Act 98-28) created separate funds to support [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=CT12R&re=0&ee=0 energy efficiency] and renewable energy.* This information summarizes the renewable energy fund.** A surcharge on Connecticut ratepayers' utility bills provides the funding for the renewables fund. In 2000-2001 the charge was set at $0.0005 per kilowatt-hour (0.5 mill per kWh), rising to $0.00075 per kWh (0.75 mill per kWh) in 2002-2003 and "not less than" $0.001 per kWh (1 mill per kWh) beginning July 1, 2004. The fund is administered and governed by the Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority, a quasi-governmental investment organization granted a significant amount of flexibility by the Connecticut General Assembly to develop programs and fund projects that meet the fund's mission. The Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority receives guidance from a board of directors, whose members include the Commissioner of the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, additional members are appointed by the Connecticut General Assembly, and the Connecticut's governor. The Department of Energy and Environmental Protection is required to approve a [http://www.ctcleanenergy.com/comprehensiveplan/ comprehensive plan] for the fund and review annual reports. The fund is to be audited annually. The fund is authorized to invest in solar-electric energy, solar-thermal energy, wind energy, ocean-thermal energy, wave or tidal energy, fuel cells, landfill gas, hydrogen production and hydrogen conversion technologies, low-impact hydropower, low-emission advanced biomass conversion technologies, alternative fuels produced in Connecticut and used for electricity generation (including ethanol and biodiesel), usable electricity from combined heat and power (CHP) systems with waste-heat recovery systems, thermal storage systems, geothermal, and "other energy resources and emerging technologies which have significant potential for commercialization and which do not involve the combustion of coal, petroleum or petroleum products, municipal solid waste or nuclear fission, financing of energy efficiency projects, and projects that seek to deploy electric, electric hybrid, natural gas or alternative fuel vehicles and associated infrastructure and any related storage, distribution, manufacturing technologies or facilities." Programs began in earnest in January 2000. For details on existing programs -- including funding amounts per program -- see the most recent [http://www.ctcleanenergy.com/AboutCCEF/AnnualReport/tabid/136/Default.aspx annual report] and the individual program records on DSIRE. In addition, each of Connecticut's municipal electric utilities is required by statute to establish a fund to provide renewable energy, energy efficiency, conservation and load-management programs (Conn. Gen. Stat. § 7-233y). To support these funds, a surcharge is imposed on the customers of electric municipal utilities according to the following schedule: 1.0 mills on and after January 1, 2006; 1.3 mills on and after January 1, 2007; 1.6 mills on and after January 1, 2008; 1.9 mills on and after January 1, 2009; 2.2 mills on and after January 1, 2010; and 2.5 mills on and after January 1, 2011. Municipal electric utilities must adopt a comprehensive plan for the spending the money collected, and the plans must be consistent with the comprehensive plan of the state's Energy Conservation Management Board (ECMB). <i>* Connecticut's restructuring legislation also created a systems benefits charge to fund public education, weatherization and energy conservation measures for low-income residents, storage and disposal costs for spent nuclear fuel, and post-retirement costs for decommissioned nuclear reactors.</i> <i>** Legislation passed in July 2011 completely restructured the Clean Energy Fund and created the Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority. Under this new structure, the rate payer funds can be leveraged to raise private investment and further support renewable and clean energy development in the state.</i>
    energy development in the state.</i>  +
  • '''''Note: Contact the program administrat
    '''''Note: Contact the program administrator to find out the current funding status of this program.''''' Established by the federal ''Energy Policy Act of 1992'', the federal Renewable Energy Production Incentive (REPI) provides incentive payments for electricity generated and sold by new qualifying renewable energy facilities. Qualifying systems are eligible for annual incentive payments of 1.5¢ per kilowatt-hour (kWh) in 1993 dollars (indexed for inflation) for the first 10-year period of their operation, ''subject to the availability of annual appropriations in each federal fiscal year of operation.'' REPI was designed to complement the federal [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=US13F&State=US&ee=1&re=1 renewable energy production tax credit] (PTC), which is available only to businesses that pay federal corporate taxes. Qualifying systems must generate electricity using solar, wind, geothermal (with certain restrictions), biomass (excluding municipal solid waste), landfill gas, livestock methane, or ocean resources (including tidal, wave, current and thermal). The production payment applies only to the electricity sold to another entity. Eligible electric production facilities include not-for-profit electrical cooperatives, public utilities, state governments and political subdivisions thereof, commonwealths, territories and possessions of the United States, the District of Columbia, Indian tribal governments or political subdivisions thereof, and Native Corporations. Payments may be made only for electricity generated from an eligible facility first used before October 1, 2016. '''Appropriations have been ''authorized'' for fiscal years 2006 through fiscal year 2026; however, program funding is determined each year as part of the U.S. Department of Energy budget process.''' If there are insufficient appropriations to make full payments for electricity production from all qualified systems for a federal fiscal year, 60% of the appropriated funds for the fiscal year will be assigned to facilities that use solar, wind, ocean, geothermal or closed-loop biomass technologies; and 40% of the appropriated funds for the fiscal year will be assigned to other eligible projects. Funds will be awarded on a pro rata basis, if necessary. In past years this has meant that actual incentive payments have corresponded to only a small fraction of the theoretical inflation adjusted incentive level of ~2 cents/kWh.
    adjusted incentive level of ~2 cents/kWh.  +
  • '''''Note: Current funding for this progra
    '''''Note: Current funding for this program is now fully reserved; however, the Minnesota Office of Energy Security (OES) has indicated that it will accept applications for a short time for placement on a waiting list.''''' The Minnesota Office of Energy Security (OES) administers a solar-electric (PV) rebate program to buy down the up-front costs of solar-electric (PV) systems for state residents and small businesses. Residential systems must be located at a primary residence; however, applicants do not need to be the primary resident in order to qualify (i.e., apartments or rental properties are eligible if at least one tenant occupies the property as a primary resident). Small business rebates are limited to Minnesota businesses with 20 or fewer full-time equivalent employees. The minimum system size is 0.5 kilowatts (kW) and capacity up to 5 kW for residential systems and 10 kW for small business systems is eligible for a rebate. Larger systems are eligible for a rebate but the incentive amount is only calculated up to these capacity limits. Past solar electric rebate participants are eligible for the program, but only for ''combined'' capacity that does not exceed the residential or small business limits above. Separate applications exist for residential and small business rebates but program rules for each are generally similar. Both grid-connected and off-grid systems are eligible for assistance under this program. Rebate levels for 2010 range from $1.50 - $2.00 per DC watt depending on installer qualifications; initial project application date; and the date that a final rebate claim is filed. Systems must be installed by a licensed electrical contractor or general contractor having at least two installations of 0.5 kW or larger in the previous 12 months; however, systems installed by contractors that meet the above criteria ''and are NABCEP certified '' are eligible for higher incentives. The list below describes how the actual incentive level is determined: * For small business applications submitted by April 30, 2010 for which a final rebate claim is submitted by September 30, 2010, the incentive is $1.75 per watt (DC), or $2.00 per watt if the installer is NABCEP certified * For small business applications submitted by April 30, 2010 for which a final rebate claim is submitted after September 30, 2010, the incentive is $1.50 per watt, or $1.75 per watt if the installer is NABCEP certified * For residential applications submitted after March 31, 2010 or small business applications submitted after April 30, 2010 the incentive is $1.50 per watt, or $1.75 per watt if the installer is NABCEP certified Participants must submit an application form to reserve a rebate before performing any installation work. The rebate reservation application contains a detailed list of equipment and installation requirements which must be met in order to qualify for incentives. After receiving confirmation from the OES, participants have nine months to install proposed systems and obtain approval by electric-utility officials (required) and local code officials (if necessary). In September 2004, the Minnesota Department of Commerce issued a two-page publication, ''[http://www.state.mn.us/mn/externalDocs/Commerce/Minnesota_Solar_Primer_092104053212_Solar%20Primer.pdf Electricity from the Sun - A Minnesota Solar Energy Primer]'', for consumers interested in the state's solar rebate program. A total of $3 million will be available during 2010 or all state solar programs, with $2.5 million set aside for the PV rebate program. Although in the past this program has been funded from the Xcel Renewable Development Fund (RDF), the 2010 program is funded using Federal economic stimulus (ARRA) money. The use of ARRA funding may require adherence to additional reporting and project implementation standards compared to prior program years. The rebate ''cannot'' be used in combination with other Xcel Renewable Development Fund support. Those who do not qualify under the current program guidelines (e.g., industrial, governmental, non-profits, etc.) are encouraged to contact the OES about other funding opportunities.
    the OES about other funding opportunities.  +
  • '''''Note: Current funding is fully reserv
    '''''Note: Current funding is fully reserved and the program is no longer accepting applications.''''' The Minnesota Office of Energy Security (OES) offers rebates for the installation of qualifying ground-source heat pumps at existing primary residences within the state. Installations undertaken as part of new construction are not eligible for a rebate. The rebate is calculated as 35% of the installed system cost up to a maximum of $10,000. Eligible costs include those associated with desuperheater equipment, but do not include equipment and labor costs for auxiliary heating equipment. The rebate may not exceed the total cost of the system minus federal, utility, or other incentives. In order to qualify for a rebate, the equipment must have been installed on or after July 1, 2009. For systems that begin construction after February 16, 2010 the applicant must submit the program application prior to beginning system construction in order to reserve rebate funds. Projects must be completed within 180 days of the date the application is approved. Only systems that use a closed-loop system to provide space heating and cooling -- including both forced air and hydronic heating systems -- are eligible for rebates. Open-loop systems, direct exchange systems, pond-loop heat exchangers, and systems connected to hot tubs or swimming pools are not eligible. In addition, in order to qualify for a rebate the system must be new; Energy Star listed under criteria established after December 1, 2009; and have a five-year equipment and installation warranty. Further requirements exist for certain aspects of the system, including the piping, heat transfer fluids, and system installation. System size is generally limited to 5.5 tons; however, the OES will accept conditional applications for larger systems that otherwise meet the program requirements. Funding for conditional applications will ultimately be determined by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The program is funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), thus all installations are subject to compliance and reporting requirements associated with the use of ARRA funds. Installations may be subject to inspection by OES personnel to verify compliance with program rules. The program application contains a detailed list of reporting and implementation standards for prospective applicants.
    tion standards for prospective applicants.  +
  • '''''Note: Currently, the four funds are n
    '''''Note: Currently, the four funds are not collecting revenue. The funds are transitioning toward a revolving loan and investment fund model in order to sustain their capital. ''''' Although Pennsylvania's December 1996 electricity restructuring law did not establish a clean-energy fund, four renewable and sustainable-energy funding programs were subsequently created through individual settlements with the state’s five major distribution utilities: Metropolitan Edison Company (Met-Ed), Pennsylvania Electric Company (Penelec), PECO Energy (PECO), PP&L (PPL), and Allegheny Power/West Penn Power Company (WPP). These utilities created individual "Sustainable Energy Funds" with the goals of promoting (1) the development and use of renewable energy and advanced clean-energy technologies, (2) energy conservation and efficiency, and (3) sustainable-energy businesses. Each utility has established an oversight board and designated a fund administrator. The four Sustainable Energy Funds (SEF) in Pennsylvania are: * The [http://www.bccf.org/pages/gr.energy.html Metropolitan Edison Region SEF] is administered by the Berks County Community Foundation. This is a companion fund to the [http://www.bccf.org/pages/gr.energy.html Penelec Region SEF], administered by the Community Foundation for the Alleghenies. * The [http://www.trfund.com/sdf Sustainable Development Fund], in Southeastern Pennsylvania PECO's service territory, is administered by The Reinvestment Fund. * The [http://www.wppsef.org West Penn Power SEF] is administered by The Energy Institute of Penn State University, in partnership with Energetics, Inc. * The [http://www.thesef.org Sustainable Energy Fund of Central Eastern Pennsylvania], in PPL's service territory, is administered by a nonprofit organization. Under terms of the initial settlements, approximately $55 million was collected through the utilities' distribution rates to promote the development of sustainable and renewable energy. The Sustainable Development Fund (in PECO’s territory) received an additional $18.5 million in funding over a five-year period as a result of the PECO/Unicom merger. Likewise, the Met-Ed and Penelec funds received an additional $5 million ($2.5 million each) in funding due to the merger of GPU Energy and FirstEnergy. The PUC agreed to continue funding the PPL SEF though December 31, 2006. The per-kilowatt-hour surcharge included in the utility's distribution rates for 2005 and 2006 was $0.0001 and $0.00005 per kilowatt-hour, respectively. As of 2011, the West Penn fund was the only fund still scheduled to receive additional revenue, equivalent to a $0.0001/kWh charge on utility distribution sales. The payments were set to sunset at the end of 2010, however, under the terms of a recent settlement agreement (see [http://www.puc.state.pa.us/ PUC Docket Number A-2010-2176732] for details) arising from the merger of Allegheny Power and First Energy, funding continued for 2011 and 2012 at the same levels. The annual payments amount to approximately $1.5 - $2 million per year and began in 2006. Without the expectation of significant additional revenue, the collective funds are making efforts to transition towards becoming revolving loan and investment funds in order to sustain their capital. The Pennsylvania Sustainable Energy Board was formed in 1999 to enhance communications among the four funds and state agencies. The board includes representatives from the PUC; the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection; the Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development; the Pennsylvania Office of Consumer Advocate; the Pennsylvania Environmental Council; and each regional board. The board's annual reports provide details on the projects and activities supported by each of the four funds. In addition, the Pennsylvania Sustainable Energy Board has developed uniform guidelines for the business practices of the sustainable energy funds. The PUC approved these guidelines in 2007. See the program web site for details on fund activities and the guidelines. See DSIRE's summaries of financial incentives in Pennsylvania for more information about assistance offerings available from the four funds.
    e offerings available from the four funds.  +
  • '''''Note: Delaware law ([http://delcode.d
    '''''Note: Delaware law ([http://delcode.delaware.gov/title26/c010/index.shtml#1014 26 Del. C. § 1014]) requires the Delaware Public Service Commission (PSC), Delaware Electric Cooperative (DEC), and municipal utilities to develop interconnection rules using as a guide the Interstate Renewable Energy Council's (IREC) model interconnection rules and the U.S. Department of Energy's best practices for interconnection. This entry largely addresses the rules used by Delmarva Power, the state's largest utility. ''''' Delmarva, Delaware's only investor-owned electric utility, has four basic levels of interconnection based on system size and system type (inverter-based or non-inverter-based). In June 2011 the PSC issued Order No. 7984 approving final revised rules to implement net energy metering pursuant to the requirements of SB267. Order No. 7984 provides, among other things, that Delmarva would file revised tariffs, applicable Interconnection Standards for Generators, and such other forms as may be necessary to comply with Order No. 7984 within 30 days of the July 10, 2011 publication of these final rules in the Delaware Register of Regulations. Effective August 8, 2011, Delmarva's new guidelines apply to interconnections of all types of distributed generation systems of less than 10 MW to the electric distribution system for the utility. Delmarva now utilizes a four-tiered approach to determine the level of review required before a system may be connected to the grid. Different levels of review are subject to specific technical screens, review procedures, and time lines. Generally speaking, the review process becomes more extensive and time consuming with increasing system size. Below are the basic criteria* for determining the level of review required for a prospective project. *'''Level 1''': Lab certified, inverter-based systems with a nameplate capacity of 10 kW or less. *'''Level 2''': Lab certified or field inverter-based systems with a nameplate capacity of 2 MW or less connected to a radial distribution circuit or to a spot network serving one customer. Alternatively, the system was reviewed and not approved under Level 1. *'''Level 3''': Only applies to systems that will not export power to the grid and which do not require new facility construction by the utility. Systems being located on an area network must be inverter-based, use lab certified equipment, and have a nameplate capacity of 50 kW or less.These systems must have an aggregate generation of 5% of an area network's maximum load or 50kW, which ever is less. Systems located on a radial network must have a capacity of 10 MW or less and not be served by a shared transformer. These systems are also subject to additional criteria dealing with the aggregate capacity of interconnected systems on a given network. *'''Level 4''': Systems with a nameplate capacity of 10 MW or less that cannot be approved or do not meet the criteria for review under a lower tier. Click [http://www.delmarva.com/home/requests/interconnection/ here] to view documents detailing Delmarva's technical standards and interconnection agreements. An interconnection request may be eligible for expedited review if small generator facilities use lab certified equipment or field approved interconnection equipment. Lab certified equipment is defined to mean equipment tested and approved by a nationally recognized testing laboratory (NRTL) as being in accordance with IEEE 1547, UL 1741, and the National Electric Code (NEC). Field approved systems are generally non-certified systems that have been tested and approved under a review by a utility over the last 36 months and are subject to certain other restrictions including utility witness tests. All interconnected systems must be equipped with a utility accessible “lockable, visible-break isolation device” or alternately, a “draw-out type circuit breaker with a provision for padlocking at the draw-out position”. This requirement is equivalent to “lockable external disconnect switch” frequently specified in other jurisdictions. Utilities may not charge any processing fees to Level 1 applicants and processing fees are limited to $50 plus $1/kilowatt (kW) of capacity for Level 2 requests and $100 plus $2/kW of capacity for Level 3 and 4 requests. The regulations also contain provisions for dispute resolution, record retention and utility reporting requirements. Additional insurance requirements vary by the Level of interconnection. The Level 1 interconnection agreement specifically states that applicants are not required to obtain general liability insurance as a condition of interconnection approval, however Delmarva does advise its customers to consider obtaining appropriate coverage to cover potential liability. For small generator facilities with a nameplate capacity of 1MW or above, the customer is required to carry adequate insurance coverage. [http://www.delmarva.com/_res/documents/DELevel_23&4Interconnection_ApplicationAgreement_DPL.pdf Section 7 of the interconnection agreement] for Levels 2,3 and 4 requires continuous liability insurance of at least $2 million per occurrence and $4 million in aggregate for systems of 1 MW or larger. Section 7 also specifies that the policy must name the utility as an additional insured party Delaware Electric Cooperative's (DEC) interconnection guidelines are similar to Delmarva's old guidelines. For renewable-energy generators 25 kW or less, systems must comply with all applicable safety and performance standards established by the National Electric Code (NEC), IEEE and UL. These systems are also eligible for net metering. DEC customers with systems greater than 25 kW are required to carry at least $1 million in liability insurance per occurrence and $1 million in property-loss insurance. Higher amounts of coverage may be required at the discretion of the DEC, although S.B. 8 states that utilities are not permitted to require "customers who meet all applicable safety and performance standards to install excessive controls, perform or pay for unnecessary tests, or purchase excessive liability insurance". An external disconnect switch is required for systems larger than 25 kW. For more information on the standards set by each utility, including some individual municipal utilities, please visit the [http://www.dnrec.delaware.gov/energy/services/Pages/GreenEnergyProgram.aspx Delaware Green Energy Program] web site. '''''*The general descriptions here are not a comprehensive listing of all testing and review criteria. Please see the actual rules for more details and additional restrictions that may apply.'''''
    ditional restrictions that may apply.'''''  +
  • '''''Note: Due to high demand, all availab
    '''''Note: Due to high demand, all available funds have for this program have already been allocated. It is possible that new program participants will be able to receive awards if additional funding becomes available.''''' The Montgomery County Clean Energy Rewards program provides incentives to Montgomery County residents, businesses, non-profits, and congregations for purchasing clean energy through certified suppliers. Customers receive a credit of 0.5 cents per kWh ($0.005/kWh)* of clean energy used. The credit applies to purchases of up to 20,000 kWh per year for residential customers and 400,000 kWh per year for non-residential customers. In order to be eligible for a reward, participants must make a minimum clean energy purchase commitment of at least 50% of their annual electricity use. The incentives are distributed by suppliers and will appear as a credit on consumer’s monthly bills. The County's Department of Environmental Protection, which administers the program, estimates that this credit should offset a significant portion of the incremental cost of clean energy. The exact level of savings depends on the relative costs of green energy products compared to standard utility price offerings. A list of participating suppliers and descriptions of eligible products are available on the program’s website. The only electricity supplier providing Clean Energy Rewards eligible products is Washington Gas Energy Services. Consumers interested in the program may also purchase renewable energy certificates (RECs). The REC marketers providing eligible REC products are Clean Currents, Sterling Planet, and WindCurrent. All suppliers and products marketed through the program are certified by DEP. Clean energy products must be generated within the U.S., tracked in a regional RTO or ISO system such as PJM GATS, WREGIS, M-RETS, etc., and composed of solar, wind, methane gas, and/or sustainable biomass. A total of $561,000 is available for rewards through 2009. Consumers can learn more about the program through the website listed above. Consumers generating electricity on their property using photovoltaics (PV) can also receive rewards from Montgomery County. Click [http://www.montgomerycountymd.gov/dectmpl.asp?url=/Content/dep/energy/EnergyIncentives.asp here] for more information on rewards for on-site renewable energy generation. ''*County Resolution 16-737 enacted in October 2008 reduced the incentive level to $0.005/kWh for all customers from the prior levels of $0.01/kWh for residential customers and from $0.015/kWh for non-residential customers. The resolution also increased the maximum non-residential purchase from 100,000 kWh to 400,000 kWh. ''
    rchase from 100,000 kWh to 400,000 kWh. ''  +
  • '''''Note: Due to the short-lived applicat
    '''''Note: Due to the short-lived application period of many solicitations (Requests For Proposals, or RFPs) offered under this program, interested parties are encouraged to access open RFPs directly at the [http://www.michigan.gov/mpsc/0,1607,7-159-52493---,00.html MPSC Energy Efficiency Grant website.] Proposals for the most recent RFP were due May 12, 2011.''''' The Michigan Public Service Commission (MPSC) Energy Efficiency Grant program, funded by the state's Low-Income and Energy Efficiency Fund, supports the implementation of energy efficiency projects and renewable energy projects in the state. The MPSC issues periodic RFPs in three categories: (1) energy efficiency for low-income clients, (2) energy financial assistance to low-income clients, and (3) energy efficiency for all customers. In addition to energy efficiency projects that reduce energy demand, previous grants have supported renewable energy project for solar, wind, anaerobic digesters, fuel cells and biofuel application. '''Eligibility''' Depending on the specifics of individual Request for Proposal (RFP), businesses, non-profit organizations, government agencies and/or schools are eligible to apply. The PSC has emphasized that this program does not provide any direct funding to homeowners or renters. Interested applicants should review currently available requests for proposals to ensure they qualify before contacting the MPSC for additional information. '''RFP Solicitation Examples''' Recent RFP solicitations have addressed subjects such as the creation of an energy efficiency and renewable energy financing system; renewable energy investments and energy efficiency upgrades by non-profits, schools, and public agencies; offshore wind feasibility studies and testing; and market advancement of smart-grid energy storage technologies. Detailed RFP information on current and past solicitations is available on the [http://www.michigan.gov/mpsc/0,1607,7-159-52493---,00.html MPSC Energy Efficiency Grant website.] Contact the PSC for more information on potential future grant funding for energy efficiency and renewable energy projects. Each RFP also contains contact information for that particular solicitation.
    ormation for that particular solicitation.  +
  • '''''Note: EWEB is no longer accepting app
    '''''Note: EWEB is no longer accepting applications for 2012 incentives. Information regarding 2013 incentives will be available in late December 2012 on the program web site. ''''' The Eugene Water & Electric Board's (EWEB) Solar Electric Program offers financial incentives for residential and commercial customers who generate electricity using solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. Rebates are available to customers who choose to net meter, and a performance-based incentive is available to customers with systems greater than 10 kilowatts (kW) in capacity who choose ''not'' to net meter. Under the latter arrangement, all electricity generated is fed into the grid.<br> <br> The rebate for residential customers who choose to net meter is $1.70 per watt-AC, with a maximum incentive of $6,000. The rebate for commercial customers who choose to net meter is $1.00 per watt-AC, with a maximum incentive of $20,000. Rebate amounts are based on the electrical output of the system after equipment and site losses are calculated. Under the rebate program, customers retain ownership of all renewable-energy credits (RECs) associated with customer generation. There is a reservation system for customers taking the rebate under the net metering program, with aggregate caps for each of three reservation periods. <br> <br> PV systems sized 10 kW to 1 megawatt (MW) in capacity that are designed to generate and feed electricity directly into the grid -- an arrangement under which the customer uses none of the electricity generated by the PV system -- are eligible for a production payment of $0.071-$0.11 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) generated, payable for 10 years (but subject to annual review). The level of the incentive varies, depending on the season and level of monthly kWh generation. These "direct generation" systems require a separate EWEB service and electric meter to measure the amount of kWh generated. Under this program, EWEB assumes ownership of all RECs associated with customer generation.<br> <br> All system owners must execute an EWEB interconnection agreement and program agreement. A building permit is required, and all systems must be inspected first by city or county building officials and then by EWEB. All system equipment must be UL-listed. All PV modules and inverters must be listed and rated in the California Energy Commission’s Emerging Renewables Program. This list is available on the Go Solar California's [http://www.gosolarcalifornia.org/equipment/ Eligible Solar Equipment] website.
    ipment/ Eligible Solar Equipment] website.  +
  • '''''Note: Effective July 15, 2013, Southw
    '''''Note: Effective July 15, 2013, Southwest Gas is no longer accepting applications for the current program year. Systems installed during the current program year will not be eligible for a rebate in the next program year, which is anticipated to begin June 1, 2014. See the website above for more details. ''''' Southwest Gas Corporation provides a financial incentive for its customers to install solar water heating systems. Rebates of $15.00/therm, capped at 50% of system cost, are available for residential and commercial solar water heaters, and commercial solar pool heaters. Residential solar pool heaters are ineligible.See the program web site for more details.
    See the program web site for more details.  +
  • '''''Note: EnergySmart rebates for the 201
    '''''Note: EnergySmart rebates for the 2014 calendar year have been fully subscribed. EnergySmart rebates will be available again beginning in January 2015. ''''' EnergySmart services are available to all businesses within Boulder County. EnergySmart offers a full suite of energy efficiency services. EnergySmart helps businesses (and [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=CO199F&re=0&ee=0 homeowners]) identify and implement energy efficiency improvements. The “One Stop Shop” aims to reduce the hassles and hurdles associated with improving the energy efficiency and comfort of a home or business by providing an expert Energy Advisor to each participant. The Advisor assists with scheduling an energy assessment, reviewing contractor bids, and identifying and applying for all applicable incentives. EnergySmart also provides rebates to commercial building owners and businesses for a wide variety of energy efficient technologies. Solar photovoltaic (PV) and other renewable energy measures may also be eligible for rebates. The total of all incentives (i.e., EnergySmart rebates, utility rebates, grants, and other available incentives) will be limited to 50-70% of project cost of eligible measures, depending on the type of technology. HVAC projects are also capped at $7,500, whichever limit occurs first. A $10,000 rebate limit will be applied to renewable energy projects, and demonstrated energy efficiency performance or improvements are required first. Rebates are first-come, first-served. Call an Energy Advisor at 303-441-1300 for more information on eligibility and the current availability of funds.
    ity and the current availability of funds.  +
  • '''''Note: FirstEnergy will periodically s
    '''''Note: FirstEnergy will periodically solicit proposals for long term contracts. Check the program web site for the most recent Requests for Proposals. ''''' As part of its [http://www.puco.ohio.gov/emplibrary/files/media/Publications/Fact_Sheets/FirstEnergy%27s%20electric%20security%20plan.pdf Electric Security Plan], FirstEnergy will periodically solicit proposals for Renewable Energy Credits (RECs) and Solar Renewable Energy Credits (SRECs). Proposals are accepted for both short-term and long-term contracts. Requests for proposals will not be available at regular intervals; check the program web site for current information regarding application due dates. FirstEnergy will not be purchasing energy or energy capacity under this proposal. All application materials are available on the program web site, and all applicants must be [http://www.puco.ohio.gov/puco/index.cfm/puco-forms/renewable-energy-resource-generating-facility-application-for-certification/ certified] by the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio. '''Long-Term Contracts''' FirstEnergy will purchase 5,000 SRECs and 20,000 RECs in equal quantities each calendar year, from 2011 to 2020. Applications for the first round of long-term contracts were due in October 2011. Check the [https://www.firstenergycorp.com/content/fecorp/upp/oh/rec_procurements.html FirstEnergy Long-Term SREC web site] for details on open or upcoming Requests for Proposals. '''Short-Term Contracts''' In the most recent short-term contract procurement, FirstEnergy is seeking to purchase 7,500 SRECs from Ohio or states contiguous to Ohio. All SRECs must be created between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2012.
    een January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2012.  +
  • '''''Note: For a limited time, generators
    '''''Note: For a limited time, generators of 6 kilowatts or less of renewable energy can now take advantage of a premium $0.10 per kilowatt hour. This premium is available on a first-come-first-serve basis to generators of solar, wind, hydro or biomass-based electricity.''''' The Palmetto Clean Energy (PaCE) Program, a green-power program designed to encourage the use of renewable energy in South Carolina, currently offers premium payments for electricity generated by customer-owned, grid-tied solar, wind, biomass, geothermal and small-scale hydropower systems. A collaborative effort among Duke Energy, Progress Energy, South Carolina Electric and Gas Company, the South Carolina Energy Office and the South Carolina Office of Regulatory Staff created PaCE in 2007, and the program was launched in April 2008. Premium payments supplement utility payments provided under renewable generator-utility power purchase agreements.* Prospective generators should contact PaCE to find out the current requirements. One block of green power costs $4 and supports approximately 100 kWh of renewable energy generation. PaCE funding comes from the customers of participating utilities who voluntarily choose to support the program through an additional charge on their monthly utility bills. Of the $4, $3 goes to the generators and $1 goes to PaCE for marketing the program. The utilities collect these customer contributions and remit the funds to PaCE, a non-profit corporation, to administer the program. All PaCE approvals of renewable generator applications, and premium payments, are subject to sufficient funding. This program is modeled on a similar program -- NC GreenPower -- in neighboring North Carolina. ''* Contact the South Carolina Energy Office or a participating utility to determine the current types of generators supported by this program. Payments provided through power purchase agreements to renewable generators depend on the time of day and season; in general, they are highest at peak hours during the summer months. These rate payments vary by utility, as do the associated administrative fees and/or other charges imposed.''
    ative fees and/or other charges imposed.''  +
  • '''''Note: For system purchased by Decembe
    '''''Note: For system purchased by December 31, 2013, LIPA is providing a bonus rebate of $500 for systems with two collectors, and $250 for systems with one collector. ''''' The Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) is now offering homeowners rebates for the installation of solar water heaters. In order to qualify for a rebate, the customer must have an existing electric hot water heater and take electric service from LIPA under an eligible rate code. The FAQ on the program web site contains information on eligible rate codes and rate changes. The rebate level is set at $20 per kBTU as determined by the SRCC collector rating, up to a maximum of $1,500 or 50% of installed project costs. Systems must be oriented in a southerly direction (south, southeast, or southwest) in order to qualify for an incentive. The solar water heater must be owned by the customer in order to qualify for an incentive; leased systems are not eligible for a rebate. Funding for this program is provided by LIPA's Efficiency Long Island program. According to LIPA's 2013 Operating Budget, a total of $340,000 in funding will be available during 2013. Please see the program web site listed at the top of this page for additional information.
    p of this page for additional information.  +
  • '''''Note: Funding for the residential ren
    '''''Note: Funding for the residential renewable energy rebates is fully reserved for 2014. Residential customers can still complete a reservation form to be added to a waiting list and will be notified if additional funding becomes available.''''' Through its Renewable Energy Rebate Program, Colorado Springs Utilities (CSU) offers a rebate to customers who install grid-connected solar-electric (photovoltaic, or PV) systems, wind systems, and solar water heaters. To calculate the PV system’s AC output, a de-rating factor is used to account for shading and suboptimal orientation or tilt. All Renewable Energy Credits (RECs) generated from systems installed under this program are transferred to CSU for compliance with Colorado’s [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=CO24R&re=0&ee=0 renewable portfolio standard].<br> <br> The utility plans to continue offering the rebate in future years pending approval by the Utilities Board, but the incentive amount is likely to decrease in future years. The application, interconnection agreement, and other documents are available at the program website above. Qualifying PV modules and inverters must be included in the California Energy Commission's (CEC) [http://www.gosolarcalifornia.org/equipment/ lists of eligible equipment]. Qualifying systems must also carry minimum manufacturer or installer warranties as outlined in the program guidelines.<br> <br> Colorado Springs Utilities recommends (but does not require) that all PV systems be designed and installed by professional installers certified by the Colorado Solar Energy Industries Association ([http://www.coseia.org/certification/ CoSEIA]) or the North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners [http://www.nabcep.org/acknowledge.cfm?normalflag=yes NABCEP]. CSU also recommends taking advantage of the utility’s energy efficiency programs—including residential energy efficiency [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=CO25F&re=0&ee=0 rebates]—before installing a PV system.
    =0 rebates]—before installing a PV system.  +
  • '''''Note: H.F. 729, enacted in May 2013,
    '''''Note: H.F. 729, enacted in May 2013, includes many changes to Minnesota's net metering law. These changes are described above, but most will not take effect until rules are implemented at the PUC. The below summary reflects the current rules.''''' Minnesota's net-metering law, enacted in 1983, applies to all investor-owned utilities, municipal utilities and electric cooperatives. All "qualifying facilities" less than 40 kilowatts (kW) in capacity are eligible.* Capacity is measured based on a system's output averaged over a 15-minute interval. There is no limit on statewide capacity. Each utility must compensate customers for customer net excess generation (NEG) at the "average retail utility energy rate," defined as "the total annual class revenue from sales of electricity minus the annual revenue resulting from fixed charges, divided by the annual class kilowatt-hour sales." This rate is basically the same as a utility's retail rate. Compensation may take the form of an actual payment (i.e., check for purchase) for NEG or as a credit on the customer's bill. For systems 40 kW to 1 MW in size, NEG will be credited at the avoided cost rate. Alternatively, a customer may elect to be compensated in the form of a kWh credit. Excess credits will be reimbursed at the end of the calendar year at the avoided cost rate. <b>Aggregate Net Metering</b> H.F. 729 requires public utilities to offer meter aggregation for customers that request it. The meter must be owned or leased by the customer requesting aggregation, and must be located on contiguous property owned by the same customer. The total aggregate of all meters is subject to the same net metering size limitations described above. “Contiguous property” means that the property shares a common border without regard to any easements, transportation right of ways, public thoroughfares, or utility right-of-ways. Utilities must comply with aggregation requests within 90 days. The aggregation of meters only applies to charges that use kWhs as the billing determinant. NEG is credited to the next monthly bill in the form of kWh credits. Utilities may request permission from the PUC to charge administrative fees for meter aggregation. <b>Community Solar Gardens</b> By September 30, 2013, Xcel Energy must file a plan with the PUC to offer a Community Solar Garden program. Other utilities may also file applications for such programs. The program must be designed to offset energy use for at least 5 subscribers, of which no single subscriber may have more than a 40% interest, and each subscription must represent at least 200 watts of the system’s generating capacity. Subscribers must be retail customers of the utility and located in the same county or a county contiguous to where the facility is located. Subscribers are compensated at the [ http://dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=MN177F&re=0&ee=0 Value of Solar Tariff] (VOST) rate (or, at the retail rate during the time before the VOST is available). Community projects may also be eligible for the solar performance based incentives offered by [http://dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=MN174F&re=0&ee=0 Xcel Energy] or the [http://dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=MN175F&re=0&ee=0 Department of Commerce]. The utility that offers the program may own the PV system, or another entity may own the project and net meter the electricity generated. Systems may be ground- or roof-mounted, must be located within the utility service territory, and may not exceed system capacity and generation limits that apply to all net-metered systems. In July 2012, the Public Utilities Commission opened Docket No. E-999/CI-12-785 in order to determine the minimum amount of electricity a customer must consume on site in order to qualify for net metering. * ''The term "qualifying facility" is defined in the federal Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA). It generally includes most renewable-energy systems and combined-heat-and-power (CHP) systems.''
    d combined-heat-and-power (CHP) systems.''  +
  • '''''Note: HB 705 of 2013 phases out this
    '''''Note: HB 705 of 2013 phases out this tax credit until its termination at the beginning of 2018 in addition to halting credits for wind energy systems and adding special provisions for leased systems. The Louisiana Department of Revenue (LDR) has developed rules to carry out mandates of the legislation available [http://www.revenue.louisiana.gov/forms/lawspolicies/RIB%2013-026.pdf here].''''' Louisiana provides a tax credit for solar energy systems purchased and installed on or after January 1, 2008 and before January 1, 2018. The credit may be applied to personal, corporate or franchise taxes, depending on the entity which purchases and installs the system, but the system must be installed at a single-family residence to be eligible (systems installed at residential rental apartments were made ineligible by HB 705 of 2013). [http://www.legis.la.gov/legis/ViewDocument.aspx?d=668768&n=HB858%20Act%20467 HB 858], enacted in July 2009, extended the tax credit to all taxpayers that purchase and install systems. (The credit was previously only available to residential property owners). Only one credit may be taken per system, so if the property is sold, the taxpayer who originally claimed the credit must disclose this, as the new owner will not be eligible for another tax credit on the same system. Each residence is limited to just one credit. A second system installed at the same residence is ineligible for a credit. The tax credit may be applied both to solar-electric systems (photovoltaic systems) and solar-thermal systems, when the energy is used for space heating, space cooling or water heating. '''Customer Owned Systems''' For systems purchased between Januay 1, 2014 and January 1, 2018, the credit is equal to 50% of the first $25,000 of the cost of each system, including installation costs. The credit must be fully claimed in the taxable year in which the system is installed and placed in service. Equipment added at a later date cannot utilize any existing system components in order to qualify for the tax credit. Any excess credit which exceeds the taxpayer's liabilities for that year shall be treated as an overpayment, and the DOR will issue a refund for the remaining amount within one year of receiving the claim. For photovoltaic (PV) systems, the tax credit applies to AC or DC generation systems which are grid-connected, net-metered systems (with or without battery backup) and stand-alone systems. Solar-thermal systems must be used for the primary purpose of heating water, space heating or space cooling. Electrical equipment must be tested and certified by a Federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) nationally recognized testing laboratory and installed in compliance with all applicable building and electrical codes. Solar thermal equipment must be certified to SRCC OG-300 by either SRCC or by listing agency such as International Association of Plumbing and Mechanical Officials (IAPMO) and installed in compliance with all applicable building and plumbing codes. Installations must be performed by a licensed contractor, the owner of the residence, or by a person who has received certification by a technical college in the installation of such systems. In order to claim a tax credit for a wind or solar energy system all components must be installed at the same time as the system. This tax credit may be combined with any federal tax incentive, but it may not be combined with any other state tax incentive. Whenever additional incentives such as cash rebates, prizes or gift certificates are offered in addition to the tax credit, the eligible cost must be reduced by the value of the additional incentive received. '''Leased Systems''' Systems leased by a third party and used at a residence can qualify for a tax credit, but there are additional provisions in the law that apply to these systems. For leased systems that are installed after December 31, 2013, the value of the credit will be reduced to 38% of the first $25,000 of the cost of each system. Additionally, leased systems can be no larger than 6 kilowatts (kW). The law also sets maximum system costs for leased systems. A leased system can claim system costs that do not exceed these limits depending on the year it is placed in service: * Placed in service between 7/1/13 - 6/30/14: $4.50 per watt with $12,500 limit * Placed in service between 7/1/14 - 6/30/15: $3.50 per watt with $9,500 limit * Placed in service between 7/1/15 - 12/31/17: $2.00 per watt with $4,560 limit
    12/31/17: $2.00 per watt with $4,560 limit  +
  • '''''Note: HR 6582 of 2012 made some modif
    '''''Note: HR 6582 of 2012 made some modifications to the efficiency standards previously adopted for some appliance types. The bill did not adopt new standards for previously unregulated appliances, but made some minor changes to the requirements for walk-in coolers, walk-in freezers, water heaters, self-contained medium temperature commercial refrigerators, central air conditioners, and heat pumps. The bill also included some non-substantive technical corrections. ''''' Minimum standards of energy efficiency for many major appliances were established by the U.S. Congress in the federal Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA) of 1975, and have been subsequently amended by succeeding energy legislation, including the [http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/appliance_standards/pdfs/epact2005_appliance_stds.pdf Energy Policy Act of 2005]. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is required to set appliance efficiency standards at levels that achieve the maximum improvement in energy efficiency that is technologically feasible and economically justified. The DOE web site lists updates and final rulings for 23 residential product categories and 18 commercial product categories. The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 ([http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=110_cong_bills&docid=f:h6enr.txt.pdf EISA]), established new standards for a few equipment types not already subjected to a standard, and updated some existing standards. Perhaps the most discussed new standard that EISA 2007 established is for general service lighting which will be deployed in two phases. First, by 2012-2014 (phasing in over several years), common light bulbs will be required to use about 20-30% less energy than present incandescent bulbs. Second, by 2020, light bulbs must consume 60% less energy than today's bulbs. This requirement will effectively phase out the incandescent light bulb. The president issued a [http://www.whitehouse.gov/the_press_office/ApplianceEfficiencyStandards Memorandum for the Secretary of Energy] in February of 2009 requesting the DOE take all necessary steps to finalize outstanding efficiency standards as expeditiously as possible. Such standards include those with deadlines prior to and including August 8, 2009. The memorandum also calls on the DOE to prioritize the development of efficiency standards for the remaining product categories based on energy savings. Standards that will result in the greatest energy savings should be developed first, however, the DOE must ensure that it meets applicable deadlines for all standards. ''Note: Several states have adopted their own appliance standards. Under the general rules of federal preemption, states which had set standards prior to federal enactment may enforce their state standards up until the federal standards become effective. States that have not set standards for a product category that is now enforced by the federal government are subject to the federal standard immediately. ''
    ct to the federal standard immediately. ''  +
  • '''''Note: Hawaii's Energy Efficiency Port
    '''''Note: Hawaii's Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard (EEPS) will not be separate from the state's Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) until January 1, 2015. Rules have not yet been established for the EEPS.''''' Hawaii enacted legislation ([http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/session2009/bills/HB1464_CD1_.htm HB 1464]) in June 2009 that established an Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard (EEPS). Hawaii's EEPS and Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) are related. Until January 1, 2015, energy efficiency is included in Hawaii's [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=HI06R&re=1&ee=1 RPS]. However, beginning in 2015, energy efficiency and displacement or offset technologies will no longer be eligible to fulfill Hawaii's RPS; these technologies will be part of the separate EEPS. Displacement or offset technologies include solar water heating, seawater air conditioning district cooling systems, and solar air conditioning. Energy efficiency technologies defined by the RPS include heat pump water heating, ice storage, ratepayer-funded energy efficiency programs, and the use of rejected heat from combined heat and power (CHP) systems. The Hawaii Public Utilities Commission (PUC) will establish rules and specify eligible technologies for the EEPS. Hawaii's EEPS set a goal of reducing electricity use by 4,300 gigawatt-hours (GWh) by 2030. The PUC must establish interim goals and may adjust the 2030 goal by rule or order. The PUC will evaluate the EEPS every five years beginning in 2013.
    e EEPS every five years beginning in 2013.  +
  • '''''Note: In 2010, the Federal Housing Fi
    '''''Note: In 2010, the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA), which has authority over mortgage underwriters Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, [http://www.fhfa.gov/Media/PublicAffairs/Pages/FHFA-Statement-on-Certain-Energy-Retrofit-Loan-Programs.aspx directed] these enterprises against purchasing mortgages of homes with a PACE lien due to its senior status above a mortgage. Most residential PACE activity subsided following this directive; however, some residential PACE programs are now operating with loan loss reserve funds, appropriate disclosures, or other protections meant to address FHFA's concerns. Commercial PACE programs were not directly affected by FHFA’s actions, as Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac do not underwrite commercial mortgages. Visit [http://pacenow.org/ PACENow] for more information about PACE financing and a comprehensive list of all PACE programs across the country.'''''<br> <br> Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing effectively allows property owners to borrow money to pay for energy improvements. The amount borrowed is typically repaid via a special assessment on the property over a period of years. Massachusetts has authorized local governments to establish such programs, as described below. (Not all local governments in Massachusetts offer PACE financing; contact your local government to find out if it has established a PACE financing program.)<br> <br> In July 2010, Massachusetts established PACE financing as part of a larger "Municipal Relief Bill" ([http://www.malegislature.gov/Bills/186/House/H04877 H.B. 4877]). This law authorizes local governments to establish an "Energy Revolving Loan Fund" to provide financing to private property owners (including condominium owners, as long as the improvements include part of the common areas/facilities) for energy efficiency and renewable energy improvements. The law permits local governments to consult with the Division of Green Communities (part of the Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources) to determine which improvements should be eligible, but in November 2010 the Division of Green Communities announced that it was not providing PACE guidance until the FHFA situation has been resolved.<br> <br> Local governments interested in establishing an Energy Revolving Loan Fund must first hold a public meeting. Then, the local government must pass an ordinance or by-law to create the program and identify the fund's administrator. Local governments are allowed to enter into agreements with other local governments to create and administer a program. After establishing an ''Energy Revolving Loan Fund'', the administrator is authorized to provide financing to property owners for energy efficiency and renewable energy improvements, provided those property owners have had an energy audit* and meet any additional energy conservation requirements. Property owners that opt in to a local program will enter into a "betterment" agreement and are responsible for repaying the assessment according to the agreement's terms.<br> <br> <br> *'' An energy audit must be performed for facilities that have not undertaken such an audit after July 1, 2008.''
    rtaken such an audit after July 1, 2008.''  +
  • '''''Note: In 2010, the Federal Housing Fi
    '''''Note: In 2010, the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA), which has authority over mortgage underwriters Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, [http://www.fhfa.gov/Media/PublicAffairs/Pages/FHFA-Statement-on-Certain-Energy-Retrofit-Loan-Programs.aspx directed] these enterprises against purchasing mortgages of homes with a PACE lien due to its senior status above a mortgage. Most residential PACE activity subsided following this directive; however, some residential PACE programs are now operating with loan loss reserve funds, appropriate disclosures, or other protections meant to address FHFA's concerns. Commercial PACE programs were not directly affected by FHFA’s actions, as Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac do not underwrite commercial mortgages. Visit [http://pacenow.org/ PACENow] for more information about PACE financing and a comprehensive list of all PACE programs across the country.'''''<br> <br> Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing effectively allows property owners to borrow money to pay for energy improvements. The amount borrowed is typically repaid via a special assessment on the property over a period of years. In 2009 New York enacted two separate bills -- A.B. 8862 in August and A.B. 40004A in November -- authorizing local governments to offer these types of programs using different mechanisms. Although some similarities exist between the two authorizations, the latter is generally much broader in scope and allows for a more versatile set of local programs than the former. (Not all local governments in New York offer PACE financing; contact your local government to find out if it has established a PACE financing program.)<br> <br> '''Municipal Sustainable Energy Loan Programs'''<br> <br> In November 2009, the New York legislature enacted A.B 40004A, authorizing counties, towns, cities and villages (collectively referred to as "municipal corporations") to offer sustainable energy loan programs. Loans may be used to pay for energy audits; cost-effective, permanent energy efficiency improvements (i.e., appliances are generally not eligible); renewable energy feasibility studies; and the installation of renewable energy systems. The authorizing legislation does not limit the authority of local governments to provide loans to different sectors (e.g., residential, commercial, etc.). Any such limitations would be determined at the local level for a specific local program.<br> <br> In order to qualify for a loan, energy audits or renewable energy feasibility studies must be performed by a contractor certified according to standards set by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) or by a local government under standards at least as stringent as those developed by NYSERDA. Energy efficiency improvements must meet cost-effectiveness criteria also established by NYSERDA. The definition of eligible renewable energy systems includes solar photovoltaic, solar thermal, wind, geothermal, anaerobic digester gas, and fuel cell systems that generate electric or thermal energy. NYSERDA is permitted to approve additional renewable energy technologies as eligible, with the exception of those that involve combustion or pyrolysis of solid waste. Loans may not be issued for energy efficiency improvements that have not been determined to be appropriate by an energy audit or for renewable energy systems that have not undergone a feasibility study. Loans may not exceed 10% of the value of the real property upon which the improvements take place, or the cost of such improvements.<br> <br> Municipal corporations are permitted to fund these programs using federal grant assistance or federal credit support mechanisms including direct loans, loan guarantees, and debt instruments. Municipal corporations may, but are not required, to provide for repayment of the loan through a charge on the real property which benefits from the loan. If a municipal corporation chooses this option, the charge must be collected at the same time and in the same manner as municipal taxes, but must be listed separately from other charges on the bill. In all cases, the loan constitutes a lien against the real property upon which the improvements take place.<br> <br> '''Energy Waste Improvement Districts'''<br> <br> In August 2009, the New York legislature enacted A.B. 8862, allowing ''towns'' to create residential home energy efficiency programs funded by periodic charges or fees for the services rendered. The effect of this policy, although not precisely a loan, is similar to a loan. In towns that offer such a program, the town would be permitted to enter into contracts for home energy audits and energy efficiency improvements on behalf of participating residents. Participating residents benefit by having improvements made upon their property by the town at no up-front cost to themselves and are permitted to repay the town for the improvements through a periodic fee or charge. The charges associated with the service constitute a lien upon the property on which the improvements took place.<br> <br> In a characteristic unique to New York, the law integrates towns' ability to offer these programs into existing provisions under which towns create refuse and garbage improvement districts and collect fees for the provision of these services. The law specifically allows for programs that are designed for "the prevention or reduction of waste matter consisting of carbon components or energy waste from residential properties and the performance of energy audits and the purchase and installation of energy efficiency improvements on such residential properties." Solar thermal technologies are considered an eligible energy efficiency improvement for the purpose of such programs. The law itself appears to be modeled after the Long Island Green Homes Program which uses the same program structure. The Long Island Green Homes program was initiated in 2008 by the Town of Babylon.
    initiated in 2008 by the Town of Babylon.  +
  • '''''Note: In 2010, the Federal Housing Fi
    '''''Note: In 2010, the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA), which has authority over mortgage underwriters Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, [http://www.fhfa.gov/Media/PublicAffairs/Pages/FHFA-Statement-on-Certain-Energy-Retrofit-Loan-Programs.aspx directed] these enterprises against purchasing mortgages of homes with a PACE lien due to its senior status above a mortgage. Most residential PACE activity subsided following this directive; however, some residential PACE programs are now operating with loan loss reserve funds, appropriate disclosures, or other protections meant to address FHFA's concerns. Commercial PACE programs were not directly affected by FHFA’s actions, as Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac do not underwrite commercial mortgages. Visit [http://pacenow.org/ PACENow] for more information about PACE financing and a comprehensive list of all PACE programs across the country.'''''<br> <br> Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing effectively allows property owners to borrow money to pay for energy improvements. The amount borrowed is typically repaid via a special assessment on the property over a period of up to 20 years. Vermont has authorized local governments to establish such programs, as described below. Over 30 municipalities have passed local ordinances to implement PACE programs.<br> <br> Vermont authorizes local governments to create Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) Districts to provide financing to owners of a "dwelling" for renewable energy and energy-efficiency projects. The Vermont definition of dwelling comes from the federal Truth in Lending Act, and is applicable to residential properties (not commercial properties). Voter approval is required to establish a PACE district. Eligible renewable-energy technologies include solar water and space heating, photovoltaics (PV), biomass energy heating systems, small wind systems, and micro-hydroelectric systems.* Eligible energy-efficiency projects have been determined by Efficiency Vermont and Burlington Electric Department** and include efficiency measures that are permanently attached to the property and reduce the net energy requirements of the building. Some examples include insulation and blower-door guided air sealing, window replacements/renovations, energy efficiency heating systems, among others. See [http://www.efficiencyvermont.com/docs/about_efficiency_vermont/initiatives/PACE_eligible_measures.pdf ''Eligibility of Projects for Vermont Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) Financing''] for detailed information.<br> <br> Property owners may opt-in to a program by signing a contract with the municipality's district. The contract specifies the amount of the loan, the terms of repayment and the associated risks (the language of the contract must include certain provisions, according to the Vermont law on PACE Districts). Participating property owners will be required to conduct an energy audit to quantify project costs, energy savings and carbon impacts. Properties that have successfully participated in formal energy efficiency programs may be able to waive the full energy audit requirement for thermal envelope improvements and instead be eligible based on energy performance criteria. Participating property owners must agree to a special assessment and lien on the property and pay a one-time, non-refundable fee (equal to 2% of the assessment) to support the reserve fund created to cover losses in the event of foreclosure of participating properties. (Efficiency Vermont will administer the reserve funds.) The municipality may release a lien on a property once the property owner has met the terms of the loan. The Department of Banking, Insurance, Securities and Health Care Administration (BISHCA) of Vermont has established [http://www.bishca.state.vt.us/reg-bul-ord/pace-assessment-underwriting-criteria-and-standards underwriting criteria and standards] as well as [http://www.bishca.state.vt.us/reg-bul-ord/pace-reserve-fund established rules] on the reserve fund supported by participating property owners, as required per the law. Legislation passed in May 2011 (H.B. 56) made several important improvements to Vermont's PACE legislation, which was originally passed in 2009. The legislation specifies that PACE liens are subordinate to existing liens and first mortgages but superior to any other liens on the property recorded after the PACE lien is recorded (except for municipal liens, which also take precedence over the PACE lien). This has been done in direct response to the FHFA statement concerning the senior lien status, which was previously in place in Vermont. In addition, the legislation creates the state PACE reserve fund, in addition to the reserve fund supported by participating property owners. An amount equal to 5% of the assessment (not to exceed $1 million) will be transferred from Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative/Forward Capacity Market funds to an escrow account maintained by the State Treasurer. This account will provide funds to cover 90% of losses due to defaults of participating properties not covered by the reserve account. The main purpose of the state PACE reserve fund is to reduce risk for potential investors interested in investing in a municipality to finance a PACE district. Legislation enacted in May 2012 authorized the Department of Public Service in collaboration with other state agencies and stakeholders to study the costs, benefits, and feasibility of expanding Vermont PACE to include commercial real estate. [http://www.leg.state.vt.us/reports/2013ExternalReports/285688.pdf The study] was released on January 15, 2013.<br> <br> Additional resources are available on the Vermont Energy Investment Corporation's [http://www.veic.org/ResourceLibrary/PACE.aspx web site]. *''The definition of renewable energy comes from ''[http://www.leg.state.vt.us/statutes/fullsection.cfm?Title=30&Chapter=089&Section=08002 ''30 V.S.A. § 8002'']. **''Efficiency Vermont and the Burlington Electric Department are the state's Energy Efficiency Utilities, tasked with providing energy efficiency services to Vermont electric customers. See DSIRE's entry on ''[http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=VT08R&re=1&ee=1 ''Efficiency Vermont'']'' for more information.''
    iency Vermont'']'' for more information.''  +
  • '''''Note: In 2010, the Federal Housing Fi
    '''''Note: In 2010, the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA), which has authority over mortgage underwriters Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, '''''[http://www.fhfa.gov/Media/PublicAffairs/Pages/FHFA-Statement-on-Certain-Energy-Retrofit-Loan-Programs.aspx '''''directed''''']''''' these enterprises against purchasing mortgages of homes with a PACE lien due to its senior status above a mortgage. Most residential PACE activity subsided following this directive; however, some residential PACE programs are now operating with loan loss reserve funds, appropriate disclosures, or other protections meant to address FHFA's concerns. Commercial PACE programs were not directly affected by FHFA’s actions, as Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac do not underwrite commercial mortgages. Visit [http://pacenow.org/ PACENow] for more information about PACE financing and a comprehensive list of all PACE programs across the country.''''' <br> Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing effectively allows property owners to borrow money to pay for energy improvements. The amount borrowed is typically repaid via a special assessment on the property over a period of years. Nevada has authorized certain local governments to establish such programs, as described below. (Not all local governments in Nevada offer PACE financing; contact your local government to find out if it has established a PACE financing program.)<br> <br> Existing Nevada law authorizes cities and counties to create special financing districts for a variety of projects that "serve a public use and will promote the health, safety, prosperity, security and general welfare of the inhabitants thereof and of the State of Nevada." The legislation enacted in May 2009 ([http://leg.state.nv.us/75th2009/Bills/SB/SB358_EN.pdf S.B. 358]) added renewable energy and energy efficient technologies to the list of projects eligible for special financing districts.
    eligible for special financing districts.  +
  • '''''Note: In 2010, the Federal Housing Fi
    '''''Note: In 2010, the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA), which has authority over mortgage underwriters Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, [http://www.fhfa.gov/Media/PublicAffairs/Pages/FHFA-Statement-on-Certain-Energy-Retrofit-Loan-Programs.aspx directed] these enterprises against purchasing mortgages of homes with a PACE lien due to its senior status above a mortgage. Most residential PACE activity subsided following this directive; however, some residential PACE programs are now operating with loan loss reserve funds, appropriate disclosures, or other protections meant to address FHFA's concerns. Commercial PACE programs were not directly affected by FHFA’s actions, as Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac do not underwrite commercial mortgages. Visit [http://pacenow.org/ PACENow] for more information about PACE financing and a comprehensive list of all PACE programs across the country.''''' Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing effectively allows property owners to borrow money to pay for energy improvements. The amount borrowed is typically repaid via a special assessment on the property over a period of years. Maine has authorized certain local governments to establish such programs, as described below. (Not all local governments in Maine will choose to offer PACE financing; review the [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=ME20F&re=0&ee=0 DSIRE entry on PACE Loans in Maine] for more information.)<br> <br> Maine signed PACE legislation into law in April 2010 authorizing municipalities to establish a loan program to provide financing for clean energy improvements to property owners via local ordinance. The legislation authorizes municipalities to enter into PACE agreements with property owners, provide financing, and collect PACE assessments to repay the loans. Municipalities will be able to use federal grants or other "funds available for this purpose" to establish PACE programs. The law does not restrict municipalities from determining what type of property owners would be eligible, but in practice the program being supported at the state level is for residential property owners. The legislation stipulates that PACE assessments will be considered subordinate liens, secondary to mortgages. Only homes located within towns that have enacted a PACE ordinance are eligible for the PACE loans. Model ordinances, as well as other related documents, can be found on the [http://www.efficiencymaine.com/documents-services Efficiency Maine website].<br> <br> Efficiency Maine Trust* has developed rules for Maine's PACE programs, which are available on the Maine PACE website. AFC Financial will administer the financial aspects of the program. Municipalities will be required to comply with the law and rules accordingly if they choose to pass a PACE ordinance and develop a PACE program for property owners.<br> The following eligibility requirements apply: * Homeowners must have a debt-to-income ratio of 45% or less * Property taxes and sewer charges must be up to date * The property is not subject to a reverse mortgage * The property may not have any outstanding notice of default, foreclosure, or delinquency on the mortgage * The homeowner must have at least as much equity in the home as the amount of PACE loan See the [http://www.efficiencymaine.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/PACE-Interim-Impact-Report-FINAL.pdf Interim Report (April 2013)] for an evaluation of Maine's PACE program. The final report is expected July 2013.<br> <br> In April 2010, state of Maine was selected to receive $30 million through the [http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/betterbuildings/neighborhoods/index.html U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Program]** program to help support implementation of its PACE programs statewide. Around 60 municipalities have elected to participate in this program. As of April 4, 2011, the program is open and accepting applications. In participating municipalities, homeowners can get PACE financing with a fixed interest rate of 4.99% and a term of up to 15 years, with the financing amount ranging from $6,500 to $15,000.<br> <br> *''Note: Efficiency Maine Trust was established by legislation in 2009 (LD 1485). This entity is responsible for coordinating the state's energy efficiency and renewable energy programs. Programs run by Efficiency Maine of the Maine Public Utilities Commission and the Energy and Carbon Savings Trust were transferred to Efficiency Maine Trust on July 1, 2010. ''<br> <br> **''The Better Buildings Program (originally called the Retrofit Ramp-up program) provided $486 million through competitive grants of the [http://www1.eere.energy.gov/wip/eecbg_grants.html Department of Energy's Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant] program. The money was allocated via the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009.''
    ery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009.''  +
  • '''''Note: In 2010, the Federal Housing Fi
    '''''Note: In 2010, the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA), which has authority over mortgage underwriters Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, '''''[http://www.fhfa.gov/Media/PublicAffairs/Pages/FHFA-Statement-on-Certain-Energy-Retrofit-Loan-Programs.aspx '''''directed''''']''''' these enterprises against purchasing mortgages of homes with a PACE lien due to its senior status above a mortgage. Most residential PACE activity subsided following this directive; however, some residential PACE programs are now operating with loan loss reserve funds, appropriate disclosures, or other protections meant to address FHFA's concerns. Commercial PACE programs were not directly affected by FHFA’s actions, as Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac do not underwrite commercial mortgages. Visit [http://pacenow.org/ PACENow] for more information about PACE financing and a comprehensive list of all PACE programs across the country.''''' '''''In May 2013 Colorado enacted legislation to enable commercial PACE programs using funds from private lenders ([http://www.leg.state.co.us/clics/clics2013a/csl.nsf/fsbillcont3/DC81393AA33AA4E387257AEE00570B0E?Open&file=212_enr.pdf S.B. 212]).'''''<br> <br> Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing effectively allows property owners to borrow money to pay for energy improvements. The amount borrowed is typically repaid via a special assessment on the property over a period of years. Colorado has authorized local governments to establish such programs, as described below. (Not all local governments in Colorado offer PACE financing; contact your local government to find out if it has established a PACE financing program.) Colorado authorized local governments to establish a PACE program in May 2008 through amending counties' and cities' existing authority to create improvement districts ([http://www.state.co.us/gov_dir/leg_dir/olls/sl2008a/sl_299.htm H.B. 1350]). The law allowed a city or county board to propose an improvement district specifically for clean energy improvements via resolution or ordinance. In 2010, it was expanded to allow multiple counties, even non-contiguous counties, to form a single improvement district ([http://www.leg.state.co.us/clics/clics2010a/csl.nsf/fsbillcont3/5411175C3CB47DBE872576AA00693157?open&file=100_enr.pdf S.B. 100]). PACE was further expanded in 2010 (and subsequently amended in 2013) by the creation of an improvement district encompassing the entire state that had authorization to issue up to $800 million in PACE bonds ([http://www.leg.state.co.us/CLICS/CLICS2010A/csl.nsf/fsbillcont3/CFC9C14941AD7A8E872576BF005A7C63?Open&file=1328_enr.pdf H.B. 1328] and S.B. 212). Cities and counties wishing to provide PACE financing programs to their citizens may, by resolution, opt to join the statewide energy improvement district and tap the bond revenue raised by the improvement district. Both energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies are PACE-eligible and among the technologies from which a local government may choose include in its program. Boulder County was the first county in Colorado to implement a program using a PACE financing mechanism (see the [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=CO154F&re=1&ee=1 Boulder County ClimateSmart Loan Program]). Local governments are also authorized to issue bonds to fund the PACE programs if voter approval is first attained. The board of the county (or city and county) can provide financing assistance to approved applicants who are constructing, expanding, or upgrading an eligible clean energy project by issuing tax-exempt private activity bonds for a minimum amount of $500,000 for a geothermal energy project and $1,000,000 for any other type of eligible clean energy project. The repayment term is a maximum of 15 years for geothermal projects and 10 years for any other type of eligible clean energy project. Geothermal projects are unique in that the repayment term can be correlated to the revenue stream associated with the project being financed by the bonds, subject to a maximum payment in a fiscal year of 75% of estimated project revenues in the fiscal year (see [http://www.leg.state.co.us/clics/clics2014a/csl.nsf/fsbillcont3/828FA2FFB895C21387257C300006F528?open&file=1222_enr.pdf H.B. 1222]).
    28?open&file=1222_enr.pdf H.B. 1222]).  +
  • '''''Note: In 2010, the Federal Housing Fi
    '''''Note: In 2010, the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA), which has authority over mortgage underwriters Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, '''''[http://www.fhfa.gov/Media/PublicAffairs/Pages/FHFA-Statement-on-Certain-Energy-Retrofit-Loan-Programs.aspx '''''directed''''']''''' these enterprises against purchasing mortgages of homes with a PACE lien due to its senior status above a mortgage. Most residential PACE activity subsided following this directive; however, some residential PACE programs are now operating with loan loss reserve funds, appropriate disclosures, or other protections meant to address FHFA's concerns. Commercial PACE programs were not directly affected by FHFA’s actions, as Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac do not underwrite commercial mortgages. Visit [http://pacenow.org/ PACENow] for more information about PACE financing and a comprehensive list of all PACE programs across the country.''''' The City of Ann Arbor offers Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing for commercial properties located within the city. Projects will undergo a voluntary special assessment and may range in size from $10,000 to $350,000. The project costs cannot exceed 20% of the property's State Equalized Value, and the lien to value of the property cannot exceed 99% of twice the State Equalized Value. Property owners may use the financing for energy efficiency and/or renewable energy projects as defined by the 2010 Michigan legislation ([http://www.legislature.mi.gov/documents/2009-2010/publicact/pdf/2010-PA-0270.pdf Public Act 270 of 2010]) which authorized local governments to create PACE programs. Commercial properties are defined as any property that is not a single family home, duplex, or certain townhouses. Projects must demonstrate that energy savings will be greater than the cost of the project. Interested residents should apply online at the [http://www.a2energy.org/commercial-savings program web site.]
    .org/commercial-savings program web site.]  +
  • '''''Note: In 2010, the Federal Housing Fi
    '''''Note: In 2010, the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA), which has authority over mortgage underwriters Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, '''''[http://www.fhfa.gov/Media/PublicAffairs/Pages/FHFA-Statement-on-Certain-Energy-Retrofit-Loan-Programs.aspx '''''directed''''']''''' these enterprises against purchasing mortgages of homes with a PACE lien due to its senior status above a mortgage. Most residential PACE activity subsided following this directive; however, some residential PACE programs are now operating with loan loss reserve funds, appropriate disclosures, or other protections meant to address FHFA's concerns. Commercial PACE programs were not directly affected by FHFA’s actions, as Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac do not underwrite commercial mortgages. Visit [http://pacenow.org/ PACENow] for more information about PACE financing and a comprehensive list of all PACE programs across the country.''''' '''PACE Overview''' Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing effectively allows property owners to borrow money to pay for energy improvements. The amount borrowed is typically repaid via a special assessment on the property over a period of years. Missouri has authorized certain local governments to establish such programs, as described below. (Not all local jurisdictions in Missouri offer PACE financing. Contact your local government to find out if it has established a PACE financing program.) '''Missouri Legislation''' In July 2010 the Missouri legislature enacted the Property Assessed Clean Energy Act. The act allows municipalities (county, city, or incorporated town or village) to create Clean Energy Development Boards, which in turn are permitted to develop local PACE programs to finance energy efficiency improvements or renewable energy improvements. A clean energy development board may be created by an individual municipality or by multiple municipalities working together. In January 2011 the [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=MO123F&re=0&ee=0 Missouri Clean Energy District] was created and is the primary mechanism for PACE financing for most of Missouri’s participating communities and counties; however, the [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=MO124F&re=0&ee=0 Set the PACE St. Louis] program implements PACE in St. Louis. '''Eligible Projects''' Many details of PACE implementation are left to the discretion of local governments. Local governments may develop programs that support both energy efficiency and renewable energy improvements. Energy efficiency improvements include but are not limited to HVAC measures, building and equipment insulation, energy recovery systems, energy controls, caulking and weather-stripping, efficient lighting, daylighting, and certain windows and doors. Renewable energy improvements include but are not limited to solar photovoltaics (PV), solar thermal, wind, biomass, and geothermal energy systems.<br> <br> Improvements must have a positive economic benefit over the term of the financing contract and contracts are limited to 20 years in length. Programs may offer PACE financing support for eligible improvements on any privately- or publicly-owned property. In order to participate in a program, property owners will enter into a special assessment contract with a clean energy development board where the property owner agrees to pay a special assessment in exchange for financing of a qualified improvement. The special assessment constitutes a lien on the property in question and will be collected in the same manner and with the same priority as ad valorem property taxes.<br> <br> '''Administration''' Clean energy development boards are invested with a variety of powers. As follows the general PACE model, the board is permitted to enter into assessment contracts with property owners and levy and collect special assessments under an assessment contract. A clean energy development board is also permitted to issue bonds or borrow money from any other private or public source. A board may also specify application and qualification criteria necessary to administer a program, including minimum energy efficiency standards, energy audits, and post-installation verification requirements.
    st-installation verification requirements.  +
  • '''''Note: In 2010, the Federal Housing Fi
    '''''Note: In 2010, the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA), which has authority over mortgage underwriters Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, '''''[http://www.fhfa.gov/Media/PublicAffairs/Pages/FHFA-Statement-on-Certain-Energy-Retrofit-Loan-Programs.aspx '''''directed''''']''''' these enterprises against purchasing mortgages of homes with a PACE lien due to its senior status above a mortgage. Most residential PACE activity subsided following this directive; however, some residential PACE programs are now operating with loan loss reserve funds, appropriate disclosures, or other protections meant to address FHFA's concerns. Commercial PACE programs were not directly affected by FHFA’s actions, as Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac do not underwrite commercial mortgages. Visit [http://pacenow.org/ PACENow] for more information about PACE financing and a comprehensive list of all PACE programs across the country.''''' Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing effectively allows property owners to borrow money to pay for energy improvements. The amount borrowed is repaid via a special assessment on the property over a period of years. With the passage of HB 5640, Michigan has authorized local governments to establish such programs, as described below. (Not all local governments in Michigan will choose to offer PACE financing; contact your local government to find out if it has or intends to establish a PACE financing program.)<br> <br> The State of Michigan signed PACE legislation into law on December 14th of 2010, authorizing municipalities to establish a loan program to provide financing for clean energy (energy efficiency and renewable energy project) improvements to '''''commercial and industrial property owners via local ordinance'''''. The legislation authorizes municipalities to enter into PACE agreements with commercial and industrial property owners, provide financing, and collect PACE assessments to repay the loans. Municipalities may choose to use federal grants, such as Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants (EECBG), or other "funds available for this purpose" to establish PACE programs. Presently, 193 counties in Michigan have commercial PACE funding under the '''''[http://www.leanandgreenmi.com/ Lean and Green Michigan Program.] '''''Refer to their website to see which counties qualify. Michigan's legislation stipulates that PACE assessments for property owners with outstanding mortgages must receive written consent from mortgage holders. In addition, qualifying energy efficiency technologies may include ''electric vehicle charging ''and ''water reduction'' infrastructure costs.
    ''water reduction'' infrastructure costs.  +
  • '''''Note: In 2010, the Federal Housing Fi
    '''''Note: In 2010, the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA), which has authority over mortgage underwriters Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, '''''[http://www.fhfa.gov/Media/PublicAffairs/Pages/FHFA-Statement-on-Certain-Energy-Retrofit-Loan-Programs.aspx '''''directed''''']''''' these enterprises against purchasing mortgages of homes with a PACE lien due to its senior status above a mortgage. Most residential PACE activity subsided following this directive; however, some residential PACE programs are now operating with loan loss reserve funds, appropriate disclosures, or other protections meant to address FHFA's concerns. Commercial PACE programs were not directly affected by FHFA’s actions, as Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac do not underwrite commercial mortgages. Visit [http://pacenow.org/ PACENow] for more information about PACE financing and a comprehensive list of all PACE programs across the country.''''' Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing effectively allows property owners to borrow money to pay for energy improvements. The amount borrowed is typically repaid via a special assessment on the property over a period of years. In 2009 New Mexico enacted two separate bills authorizing local governments to offer these types of programs using different mechanisms. (Not all local governments in New Mexico offer PACE financing; contact your local government to find out if it has established a PACE financing program.)<br> <br> '''Renewable Energy Financing District Act'''<br> <br> New Mexico enacted [http://www.nmlegis.gov/Sessions/09%20Regular/final/SB0647.pdf S.B. 647] in 2009, which authorizes municipalities and counties to create renewable energy financing districts (REFD) for the purpose of providing financing for consenting property owners within the district to install renewable energy technologies. Eligible technologies include photovoltaics, solar thermal, geothermal, and wind. A county is authorized to create a REFD in both its unincorporated and incorporated areas (provided that the county receives the consent of the impacted municipalities in an incorporated area). A municipality may create a REFD within its borders. Municipalities and counties must follow the same process for establishing a REFD. First, it must draft and adopt a resolution that includes specific details of the district, such as the types of renewable energy technologies to be included. After passing the resolution, the county or municipality must hold a public hearing and solicit feedback from stakeholders. Finally, after considering the opinions and comments, it is required to establish the REFD by way of ordinance. Once the district is formed, individual property owners may opt in to participate per the terms of the program. Any financing a property owner receives is repaid as an assessment on their property tax and will be a senior lien on the property until fully repaid. The district may issue bonds to fund financing programs and the standards for the district board’s roles and powers. Each district will be governed by a district board of five members. These members may be from the local government or individuals appointed by the local government (either way, the makeup of the board must be specified in the resolution and subsequent ordinance). '''Solar Energy Improvement Special Assessment Act'''<br> <br> New Mexico also enacted [http://www.nmlegis.gov/Sessions/09%20Regular/final/HB0572.pdf H.B. 572] in 2009, which authorizes a county to pass an ordinance that creates a “solar energy improvement special assessment” provision. The county itself is not authorized to provide funding directly to property owners; rather, it creates rules for certifying certain private banks and financing institutions as “solar energy improvement financing institutions.” Solar energy improvement financing institutions are authorized to loan property owners up to 40% of the assessed value of the property for purposes of solar energy (photovoltaic or solar thermal) improvements. The property owner will enter into a direct agreement with a certified financial institution for the funding and they will be required to apply to the county as well, since the loan through the private institution will be paid via an assessment on their property tax and will constitute a lien on the property. The county devises the process for transferring funds collected via the special assessment to the participating financial institution. No county my pass an ordinance that contains additional provisions to those outlined in the law (e.g., an ordinance may not require property owners to receive an energy audit as a condition of participation).
    gy audit as a condition of participation).  +
  • '''''Note: In 2010, the Federal Housing Fi
    '''''Note: In 2010, the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA), which has authority over mortgage underwriters Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, '''''[http://www.fhfa.gov/Media/PublicAffairs/Pages/FHFA-Statement-on-Certain-Energy-Retrofit-Loan-Programs.aspx '''''directed''''']''''' these enterprises against purchasing mortgages of homes with a PACE lien due to its senior status above a mortgage. Most residential PACE activity subsided following this directive; however, some residential PACE programs are now operating with loan loss reserve funds, appropriate disclosures, or other protections meant to address FHFA's concerns. Commercial PACE programs were not directly affected by FHFA’s actions, as Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac do not underwrite commercial mortgages. Visit [http://pacenow.org/ PACENow] for more information about PACE financing and a comprehensive list of all PACE programs across the country.''''' Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing effectively allows property owners to borrow money to pay for energy improvements. The amount borrowed is typically repaid via a special assessment on the property over a period of years. Minnesota has authorized certain local governments to establish such programs, as described below. (Not all local jurisdictions in Minnesota offer PACE financing. Contact your local government to find out if it has established a PACE financing program.)<br> <br> In April 2010, Minnesota enacted legislation (H.F. 2695) allowing cities (home-rule, charter or statutory), counties and towns to offer PACE financing programs that provide loans to local residents for energy conservation improvements, including certain renewable energy systems. Subsequent legislation (S.F. 3729) allows a local government to designate another authority -- referred to hereafter as the "implementing entity" -- to implement such a program. This could include a housing and redevelopment authority, economic development authority, port authority, or another entity permitted by law to exercise the powers of an authority. The authorizing laws sets a series of rules governing these local programs, but some details are left to the local government that establishes a program. Qualifying properties are defined as residential, multi-family residential, commercial, or industrial properties which would benefit from energy conservation improvements based on the results of a formal energy audit or renewable energy feasibility study.<br> <br> Renewable energy is defined to include solar thermal, photovoltaic (PV), wind, and geothermal energy systems that generate electrical or thermal energy. Eligible solar thermal systems generally includes both water and space heating systems except for residential systems (1) that provide less than half of the energy used for that purpose in the home or (2) which are used to heat a hot tub or pool. All renewable energy systems must be used for on-site energy needs. Energy generated by the system may not be sold, transmitted, or distributed at retail or be used to power an off-site facility. The law appears to limit on-site generating capacity to 10 MW (the limit defined in Minn Stat. 216B.1611 describing standardized interconnection procedures). Other qualified improvements include energy efficiency measures which are permanently affixed to the property and which result in a net reduction of energy consumption, and equipment which enables electric vehicle charging.<br> <br> Under the state law, implementing entities must set loan maturities at the weighted average of the useful life of improvements made to the property, not to exceed 20 years. Payments must be made in 20 equal annual installments. Interest rates are locally determined, but must be sufficient to cover program costs, including the issuance of bonds and any financing delinquencies. Loans amounts may not exceed 10% of the assessed value of the property and may include costs related to the required energy audit or feasibility study, equipment and labor costs, and performance verification. At least ten percent of the improvements financed by the program must be inspected and verified by the implementing entity. Loans must be secured with a lien against the property and must be coordinated with the Conservation Improvement Program (CIP) of the utility serving the property. Implementing entities may limit the number of properties for which a qualifying owner may receive financing. Programs must be designed such that they do not prohibit the financing of all cost-effective energy improvements not otherwise prohibited by law. "Cost Effective Energy Improvements" are defined as "energy improvements that have been identified in an energy audit or renewable energy system feasibility study as repaying their purchase and installation costs in 20 years or less, based on the amount of future energy saved and estimated future energy prices.”<br> Implementing entities are permitted to issue revenue bonds to initially fund a program. Proceeds from loan repayments, in the form of special assessments on participating properties, will be used to service bond principal and interest. The special assessment runs with the property in the event ownership of the property changes during the term of the loan. In November 2011, Edina City Council voted to adopt the first PACE program in Minnesota. The Edina Emerald Energy Program provides financing for commercial properties for certain efficiency and renewable energy technologies. Program guidelines can be found [http://www.dsireusa.org/documents/Incentives/EEEP.doc here].
    a.org/documents/Incentives/EEEP.doc here].  +
  • '''''Note: In April 2014, the Nebraska gov
    '''''Note: In April 2014, the Nebraska governor signed [http://nebraskalegislature.gov/FloorDocs/103/PDF/Slip/LB402.pdf L.B. 402], which significantly changed eligibility requirements and statutory provisions related to community-based energy development projects. Among the most significant changes is that projects eligible for the sales and use tax exemption now include energy projects related to wind, solar, biomass, or landfill gas fuel sources. Previously, only wind projects were eligible. ''''' In May 2007 Nebraska established an exemption from the sales and use tax imposed on the gross receipts from the sale, lease, or rental of personal property for use in a community-based energy development (C-BED) project. Nebraska also enacted the Rural Community-Based Energy Development Act ([http://nebraskalegislature.gov/FloorDocs/100/PDF/Slip/LB629.pdf L.B. 629)] to authorize and encourage electric utilities to enter into power purchase agreements with C-BED project developers. To claim the exemption, filing requirements imposed by the Tax Commissioner must be met. '''Eligible Projects'''<br> <br> A C-BED project is defined as a new energy generation project using wind, solar, biomass, or landfill gas as the fuel source that has at least 25% of the gross power purchase agreement payments flowing to the qualified owner or owners or as payments to the local community and has a resolution of support adopted by the county board of each county in which the C-BED project is located or by the tribal council for a C-BED project located within the boundaries of an Indian reservation. “Payments to the local community” include, but are not limited to, lease and easement payments part of a C-BED project; contract payments to Nebraska companies that meet specific statutory requirements for services, materials, equipment, and components necessary to permit or construct the C-BED project; other parts, materials, or components that are manufactured, assembled, or fabricated in Nebraska not included above.<br> <br> '''Qualified Project Owners''' A qualified C-BED project owner means: * a Nebraska resident; * a limited liability company that is organized under the Limited Liability Company Act and that is entirely made up of members who are Nebraska residents; * a Nebraska nonprofit corporation; * an electric supplier(s), subject to certain limitations for a single C-BED project; * a tribal council; * a domestic corporation domiciled in Nebraska; or * a cooperative corporation domiciled in Nebraska
    perative corporation domiciled in Nebraska  +
  • '''''Note: In July 2012, the Public Utilit
    '''''Note: In July 2012, the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio (PUCO) opened a docket ([http://dis.puc.state.oh.us/CaseRecord.aspx?CaseNo=12-2051&x=0&y=0 Case 12-0251-EL-ORD]) to review the net metering and interconnection rules for investor-owned utilities. Details will be posted as more information is available.''''' Prompted by the federal Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio (PUCO) adopted new interconnection standards for distributed generation in March 2007. These standards, which apply to customers of Ohio's investor-owned utilities, replaced the state's original interconnection standards, adopted in April 2000. Ohio's interconnection standards provide for three levels of review for the interconnection of DG systems up to 20 megawatts (MW) in capacity: '''Level 1 interconnection''' is divided into three subsections: <ul><li>'''Level 1''' is a simplified review process for inverter-based systems of up to 10 kilowatts (kW) that use renewable energy as the fuel. The point of common coupling cannot be the transmission line. Systems must meet IEEE 1547 and UL 1741 standards. <li>'''Level 1.1''' is a simplified review process for inverter-based systems of up to 10 kW. The point of common coupling cannot be the transmission line, and the interconnection must be located on the load side of an area network. Systems must meet IEEE 1547 standards. <li>'''Level 1.2''' is for systems of up to 50 kW that are interconnected to an area network. Systems must meet IEEE 1547 standards.</ul> '''Level 2 interconnection''', the expedited review procedure,applies to certified, inverter-based or synchronous systems up to 2 MW in capacity. These systems must meet IEEE 1547 and UL 1741 standards and may not be interconnected at the transmission level. Technical screens, fees and timelines are detailed in the rules.<br> '''Level 3 interconnection''', the standard procedure, applies to inverter-based or synchronous systems up to 20 MW in capacity that do not qualify for Level 1 or Level 2 certification. Technical screens, fees and timelines are detailed in the rules.<br> PUCO has developed two application forms for interconnection: a "short form" application for systems up to 50 kW in capacity, and a standard application for systems that do not qualify for the "short form" application. PUCO also provides a checklist for applicants to determine whether to complete the "short form" or the standard form. (On the PUCO interconnection web site, scroll down to "definitions" and then to "application" to access both types of applications as well as the [http://www.puco.ohio.gov/PUCO/Consumer/Information.cfm?id=8870 check list].) Each utility must provide applicants with a standard agreement, and must designate an employee or office to handle interconnection application requests. Utilities may not require additional liability insurance beyond proof of insurance. The rules include a provision for alternative dispute resolution, and for formal complaints brought by applicants and interconnected customers. Interconnection to area networks is generally permitted.
    n to area networks is generally permitted.  +
  • '''''Note: In July 2012, the Public Utilit
    '''''Note: In July 2012, the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio (PUCO) opened a docket ([http://dis.puc.state.oh.us/CaseRecord.aspx?CaseNo=12-2050-EL-ORD Case 12-0250-EL-RDR]) to review the net metering rules for investor-owned utilities. Details will be posted as more information is available.''''' Ohio's net-metering law requires electric distribution utilities to offer net metering to customers who generate electricity using wind energy, solar energy, biomass, landfill gas, hydropower, fuel cells or microturbines. Although there is no stated capacity limit on an individual net-metered energy system in Ohio, the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio (PUCO) has ruled that "an implied limitation" is in effect because, by statute, a net-metered system must be "intended to offset part or all of the customer-generator's electricity requirements." Net-metered customers are required to use a single meter capable of recording flow of electricity in each direction. Net-metered customers may request refunds of net excess generation (NEG) credits accumulated over a 12-month period. The electric distribution utilities and competitive retail electric service providers are required to develop a separate net metering tariff for hospital facilities. Qualifying hospital customer generators are not limited to the same energy generation technologies or system size restrictions described above for non-hospital net-metered customers. Two meters or a single meter with two registers capable of separately measuring flow of electricity in both directions are required for hospital net metering. <u>All</u> electricity generated by the hospital (including that generation used directly by the hospital and that which is sent back to the utility) will be credited at the market value at the time of generation. Electricity flowing from the utility and used by the hospital will be charged at the same rates as normal, as if the hospital were not net metering. The monthly bill will calculate the net of this total hospital customer generation vs. utility provided electricity to determine the bill. Any net credit dollar amount will be used against the hospital’s bill until the hospital requests a refund for any accumulated credits over a 12-month period. Net-metered systems must meet safety standards specified by the National Electrical Code (NEC), the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), and Underwriters Laboratories (UL). Utilities may not require customer-generators to comply with additional safety and performance standards. History: Ohio’s original net-metering law was enacted in 1999 as part of the state’s electric-industry restructuring legislation. The Public Utilities Commission of Ohio (PUCO) later revised its net metering rules in March 2007, prompted by the federal Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005). Initially, the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio (PUCO) required utilities to credit customer net excess generation (NEG) at the utility's full retail rate. However, in June 2002, the Ohio Supreme Court decided that this exchange was illegal (Case No. 01-0573) and ruled that each utility must credit NEG to the customer at the utility's unbundled generation rate. Legislation enacted in May 2008 ([http://www.legislature.state.oh.us/BillText127/127_SB_221_EN_N.pdf S.B. 221]) further amended Ohio's net metering law by: (1) removing the 1% aggregate capacity limit for all customer-generators; and (2) removing all limitations related to energy generation technology and system size on systems sited at hospitals.
    system size on systems sited at hospitals.  +
  • '''''Note: In March 2011, Virginia enacted
    '''''Note: In March 2011, Virginia enacted HB 1983, which increased the residential net-metering limit to 20 kW. However, residential facilities with a capacity of greater than 10 kW must pay a monthly standby charge. The Virginia State Corporation Commission approved standby charges for transmissions and distribution components as proposed by Virginia Electric and Power Company (Dominion Virginia Power) on November 3, 2011.''''' Virginia's net-metering law applies to residential generating systems up to 20 kilowatts (kW) in capacity and non-residential systems up to 500 kW in capacity (utilities may choose to offer net metering to larger non-residential systems). Net metering is available on a first-come, first-served basis until the rated generating capacity owned and operated by customer-generators reaches 1% of an electric distribution company's adjusted Virginia peak-load forecast for the previous year. Net metering is available to customers of investor-owned utilities (including competitive suppliers) and electric cooperatives, but not to customers of municipal utilities. Net-metered energy is measured by a meter capable of gauging electricity flow in both directions. Monthly net excess generation (NEG) is carried forward to the next month. At the end of each 12-month period, the customer has the option of carrying forward eligible excess NEG to the next net metering 12-month period or selling the NEG to the utility. The amount of credit to be carried forward to a subsequent net metering period may not exceed the amount of energy purchased during the previous annual period.* In the case of selling the NEG to the utility, the customer must submit a written request to establish a power purchase agreement with the utility prior to the beginning of the net metering period to be covered by the power purchase agreement. The investor-owned utility must pay avoided cost (or higher if agreed upon). Net metering is also available to customers on time-of-use tariffs (with time-of-use applicable NEG calculations). Customer-generators own all of the renewable energy credits (RECs) their system generates. Virginia's net metering law states that at the time a customer enters into a power purchase agreement with the utility for net excess generation, the customer has a one-time option to sell RECs to the utility. This provision does not preclude the customer and utility (or other entity) from voluntarily entering into an agreement for the sale and purchase of RECs at any other time. Any residential net-metering customer of Dominion Virginia Power who owns and operates, or contracts to own and operate, an electric generation system with a capacity greater than 10kW and less than 20kW is required to pay transmission and distribution standby charges effective April 1, 2012. Customers will be required to pay $2.79 a kW in monthly distribution standby charges and $1.40 kW in monthly transmission standby charges. The SCC denied Dominion's proposal for generation standby charges, but Dominion may reapply for approval for these charges in the future. '''<u>History</u>''' In April 2009, the Governor signed legislation (HB 2155) making changes to net metering in Virginia. System size caps for net metering were not changed, but HB 2155 allows utilities to approve a higher capacity limit at their discretion. The bill also permits customers that are served on time-of-use tariffs to participate in net metering. Finally, the bill establishes ownership of renewable energy certificates as described above. The SCC regulations take effect late April 2010. Utilities must file standard tariffs to comply with the new regulations. In 2013, HB 1695 created net metering programs for agricultural customers of investor-owned utilities and electric cooperatives. Program must begin prior to July 1, 2014, for customers of investor-owned utilities and no later than July 1, 2015, for customers of electric cooperatives, to afford eligible agricultural customer-generators the opportunity to participate in net energy metering. ''* For example, if a customer-generator bought 1,500 kilowatt-hours (kWh) from a utility during the first 11 months of the annual period, and then generated 2,000 kWh of excess electricity in the 12th month, the customer could carry forward 1,500 kWh to the following month, and the remaining 500 kWh would be granted to the utility.''
    500 kWh would be granted to the utility.''  +
  • '''''Note: In order to participate in this
    '''''Note: In order to participate in this program, customers must have signed an agreement by December 31, 2012. Check the program web site above for information regarding future solicitations. ''''' Duke Energy Ohio offers the Solar Renewable Energy Credits program to residential customers in Ohio that install solar photovoltaic (PV) systems on their homes. One solar renewable energy credit (SREC) is created when a PV system generates one megawatt (MW) of electricity. The prices are set by market conditions for the year in which the REC was created. The price for RECs in 2010 was $300. In order to qualify for the program, a customer must [http://www.puco.ohio.gov/PUCO/Forms/Form.cfm?id=9464 register the facility] with the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio and establish an account with either the Generating Attributes Tracking System (GATS) or the Midwest Renewable Energy Tracking System (M-RETS). Eligible customers must sign a 15-year purchase agreement with Duke Energy by '''December 31, 2012''' and sign an interconnection agreement with the company. PV systems comply with the standard net-metering requirements of Duke Energy's net metering program, and systems 6 kilowatts (kW) or larger require an additional meter. Once a customer signs a purchase contract with Duke Energy, RECs will be certified by the tracking company after December 31 of each year. The customer must then transfer the RECs and forward an invoice directly to Duke Energy on or before February 15 in order to receive payment.
    e February 15 in order to receive payment.  +
  • '''''Note: In pursuant to S.B. 07026, the
    '''''Note: In pursuant to S.B. 07026, the expiration deadline for the eligible renewable energy projects have been extended to 01/01/2025. ''''' Section 487 of the New York State Real Property Tax Law provides a 15-year real property tax exemption for solar, wind energy, and farm-waste energy systems constructed in New York State. As currently effective, the law is a ''local option'' exemption, meaning that local governments are permitted decide whether or not to allow it. The exemption was mandatory prior to a 1990 reenactment in which the local option clause was added. The exemption is valid unless a government opts out of the exemption, as opposed to the more common practice of requiring governments to "opt-in" in order to offer an exemption. <br> <br> As originally created, the exemption was limited to solar and wind energy systems, but in September 2002, it was expanded (S.B 6592) to include farm-waste energy systems. These are defined as systems and related equipment that generate electric energy from biogas produced by the anaerobic digestion of agricultural waste -- such as livestock manure, farming waste and food processing wastes. The maximum rated system capacity for eligible farm-waste energy systems is 400 kilowatts (kW) and systems must be connected to the electric grid and operated in accordance with the state's net metering law (Public Service Law 66-j) in order to qualify. S.B. 5966A enacted in July 2006 extended the previous December 31, 2006 in-service deadline to December 31, 2010, and A.B. 10875 enacted in August 2010 extended the deadline until December 31, 2014. S.B 07062 further extended the deadline to January 1<sup>st</sup>, 2025.<br> <br> The exemption applies to systems that are (a) existing or constructed prior to July 1, 1988 (mandatory), or (b) constructed subsequent to January 1, 1991, and prior to January 1, 2025 (local option). The law intends to encourage the installation of solar, wind and farm-waste energy equipment systems and to ensure property owners that their real property taxes will not increase as a result of the installation of these systems. The amount of the exemption is equal to the increase in assessed value attributable to the solar, wind or farm-waste energy system. The definition of solar includes passive solar heating systems such as mass wall and direct gain systems. In the case of solar pool heating, solar energy collection, control, and distribution equipment is eligible; however, the pool itself does not qualify as a storage medium or otherwise. The exemption applies only to general municipal and school district taxes; it cannot be applied to special assessments or special ad valorem levies. <br> <br> With respect to systems constructed after January 1, 1991, and before January 1, 2025, each county, city, town, village and school district (except the city school districts of New York, Buffalo, Rochester, Syracuse and Yonkers) may choose whether to disallow the exemption. The option must be exercised by counties, cities, towns and villages through adoption of a local law and by school districts through adoption of a resolution. Click [http://www.tax.ny.gov/research/property/legal/localop/487opt.htm here] for a list of local bodies that have opted not to offer the exemption. Alternately, a local government that has not opted out of the exemption is permitted to require the property owner to enter into a contract for payments in lieu of taxes, not to exceed the amount payable without the exemption. <br> <br> Eligibility definitions and guidelines solar, wind-energy, and farm waste energy equipment have been issued by the New York State Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) and are available above or on the program website.
    available above or on the program website.  +
  • '''''Note: In the spring on 2012, the city
    '''''Note: In the spring on 2012, the city of Frisco was working to update the residential requirements. No official city council action had been taken at the time this summary was updated. Check program web site for current status of updates.''''' The city of Frisco administers a green building program with separate rules for commercial and residential structures. The programs are governed by separate ordinances passed at different times although both were amended in October 2006 with updated building information. Each also contains other environmental related restrictions in addition to energy efficiency requirements. '''Residential''' The residential green building program began in 2001 under Ordinance No. 01-05-39, which required that all single-family residential structures platted after May 31, 2001 receive the EPA Energy Star designation for energy efficiency. The original ordinance was amended in 2006 with additional requirements for structures with building permits filed after June 30, 2007. These new structures are required to be meet Energy Star specifications with a score of 83 or lower on the Home Energy Rating System (HERS) index. An Energy Star designation requires a HERS score of 85 or lower. The amendment also requires: * Every home be tested (i.e., no batch testing) by an accredited Residential Energy Services Network (RESNET) HERS inspector, who must register annually with the city; * Every story have at least one programmable thermostat; * Air distribution system joints be sealed with duct mastic; * Pressure differential between closed-off rooms and the location of the central air return not exceed ±3 Pa; * All structures meet ASHRAE Standard 62.2 and other indoor air quality standards; * Compliance with the city landscape ordinance (water conservation); and * Construction waste recycling Over 16,246 green homes have been built since the inception of the program in 2001. On average, the program saves households $436 or more in utility expenses each year and has avoided over 38,505 tons of CO2 emissions (statistics provided by the City of Frisco). '''Commercial''' The commercial green building program was initiated in May 2004 under Ordinance No. 04-05-41, which required that all non-single family developments of greater than 10,000 square feet complete the United States Green Building Council (USGBC) Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design* (LEED) checklist. There were no compulsory building requirements in the initial stages of this program. The law simply required the checklist data be submitted to city planners for one year (beginning Sept. 2004) in order to determine the effect of such a program on private development. This ordinance was repealed in Oct. 2006 in favor of a new ordinance defining design requirements for all non-residential and multifamily dwellings sited on or after Nov. 27, 2006. The new ordinance requires that 100% of all roof areas comply with the EPA Energy Star Cool Roof Program as it exists or may be amended, and that buildings fulfill specific heat island mitigation, water conservation, and construction waste recycling standards. As of July 2012, over 7,310,340 square feet of "green" commercial space has been built (statistics provided by the City of Frisco).
    tatistics provided by the City of Frisco).  +
  • '''''Note: Incentive offers are subject to
    '''''Note: Incentive offers are subject to funding availability and may change, see Energy Trust’s website for current offerings.''''' Energy Trust of Oregon offers commercial businesses in Oregon a menu of services and incentives for new building construction or major renovation projects which utilize energy efficient equipment and design standards. New construction or major renovation projects may qualify for financial assistance and technical support in the following areas: professional support incentives, installation incentives and post-occupancy incentives. Customers of Pacific Power, Portland General Electric, NW Natural and Cascade Natural Gas are eligible to participate. To learn more, visit the [http://energytrust.org/business/incentives/other-businesses/new-construction/ Energy Trust] website or call 1.877.467.0930.
    rgy Trust] website or call 1.877.467.0930.  +
  • '''''Note: LADWP accepted applications for
    '''''Note: LADWP accepted applications for the second 20 MW allocation of the 100 MW FiT Set Pricing Program between July 8 and July 12, 2013. ''''''''''This program is the first component of a 150 megawatt (MW) FiT Program, and is designed to support 100 MW. The full 100 MW of contracts will be offered in five 20 MW allocations occurring every six months. A plan for the additional 50 MW program is still in development. See the web site above for more information.''''' LADWP is providing a Feed-in Tariff (FiT) program to support the development of renewable energy projects in its territory. All technologies eligible for compliance with the state's [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=CA25R&re=0&ee=0 renewables portfolio standard] are eligible for the FiT, though LADWP expects the majority of projects to be photovoltaic (PV) systems. Project must be registered as RPS-compliant with the California Energy Commission to be participate. The full 100 MW of contracts awarded through this program will be offered in five 20 MW allocations occurring every six months. Of those 20 MW, 4 MW will be reserved for small projects between 30 kW and 150 kW. If the small projects reach their reserved capacity limit before the total reserved capacity is met for a Tier, the remaining small projects will qualify under the total reserved capacity allocation until that category is exhausted. During the first five business days of each application period, all submitted applications will be prioritized on the FiT Reservation List by lottery. Applications received after the first five business days will prioritized in the order they are received. The amount LADWP will pay for each kilowatt-hour (kWh) produced will be a product of the Base Price of Energy (BPE) multiplied by the appropriate Time-of-Delivery (TOD) Multiplier. The BPE is scheduled to decline as each 20 MW allocation is subscribed. The TOD multiplier varies by time of day and time of year with the highest multiplier being available between 1:00 PM and 5:00 PM during June through September. The full schedule for BPE prices and TOD multipliers can be seen in the tables below. '''Base Price of Energy''' {
    {  +
  • '''''Note: LADWP reached its budget limit
    '''''Note: LADWP reached its budget limit for non-residential solar incentive applications in Augugst 2012. Applicants who have not received a confirmation as of August 22, 2012, have had their applications cancelled, and will need to reapply when the program reopens on July 1, 2013.''''' The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power's (LADWP) Solar Incentive Program began in 2000, with a funding level of $150 million. The California Solar Initiative, created in 2007 upon the enactment of SB 1, established new guidelines for municipal utilities to follow, and established new funding levels. The LADWP Board of Commissioners approved the Solar Incentive Program Guideline Revisions on September 4, 2007, to comply with SB1. The revised program was suspended in early 2011, but was revised and relaunched on September 1, 2011. The Solar Incentive Program has 10 phases with declining incentive levels as certain installed megawatt (MW) targets are met. There are separate goals for residential and non-residential participants, and the incentive levels for each will decline irrespective of the other. All incentives are adjusted for expected performance. Non-residential systems may be eligible for bonus incentives if they utilize equipment manufactured in LA or if the systems is building-integrated PV. <br> <br> LADWP’s 10-year, $313 million Revised Solar Photovoltaic Rebate Program began in 2007 and will remain in effect through December 31, 2017, or until the total installed MW goal has been reached.
    total installed MW goal has been reached.  +
  • '''''Note: LORI grants are no longer avail
    '''''Note: LORI grants are no longer available for photovoltaic (PV) systems. Funding for PV systems is now available through [http://www.masstech.org/solar Commonwealth Solar], a state-funded rebate program that took effect in January 2008.''''' The Massachusetts Technology Collaborative’s (MTC) Large Onsite Renewables Initiative (LORI) provides two types of grants -- Feasibility Study Grants, and Design and Construction Grants -- on a competitive basis to expand the production and use of distributed renewable-energy technologies in the state. MTC is the administrator of the Renewable Energy Trust Fund, the state's public benefits fund for renewable energy. Program funds support grid-tied renewable-energy projects (excluding PV) greater than 10 kilowatts (kW) in capacity that are located at commercial, industrial, institutional and public facilities that will consume more than 25% of the renewable energy generated by the project on-site. The applicant and project site must be a customer of a Massachusetts investor-owned electric distribution utility or a municipal utility that pays into the Renewable Energy Trust. Grant awards may be used to facilitate the installation of renewable-energy projects on existing buildings (retrofits) or in conjunction with new construction/major renovation projects, including green buildings. The sixth round of LORI funding, totaling approximately $3 million, was made available in August 2008. '''The application deadline for this round of funding is October 9, 2008.''' Under this solicitation, Feasibility Grants are capped at $40,000, with an applicant cost-share of 15%. Design and Construction Grants are calculated based on an incentive matrix (see solicitation). Design Grants are capped at the lesser of $125,000 or 75% of actual cost, and construction grants are capped at the lesser of $275,000 or 75% of actual costs. See the current solicitation on the program web site for more details. MTC anticipates issuing new rounds of LORI funding twice annually -- usually in February and August. Eligible technologies generally include wind energy; fuel cells (using any fuel source); hydroelectric power; landfill gas; and low-emission, advanced biomass power-conversion technologies such as gasification using biomass fuels (e.g., wood, agricultural or food wastes, energy crops, biogas, biodiesel or organic refuse-derived fuel). All equipment (except hydroelectric equipment) funded in part or in whole by MTC must be new. Refurbished hydroelectric equipment with warranties and service support options comparable to new equipment may be accepted subject to MTC approval.
    t may be accepted subject to MTC approval.  +
  • '''''Note: Legislation passed in 2012 (S.B
    '''''Note: Legislation passed in 2012 (S.B. 289 and S.B. 315) added certain new technologies to the list of eligible Renewable Energy Resources and Advanced Energy Resources. In July 2012, The PUCO opened [http://dis.puc.state.oh.us/CaseRecord.aspx?CaseNo=12-2156 Docket 12-2156-EL-ORD] in order to implement the changes. PUCO is accepting comments on the proposed rules, and comments reviewing OAC 4901:1-10, until January 7, 2013. ''''' In May 2008, Ohio enacted broad electric industry restructuring legislation (S.B. 221) containing advanced energy and renewable energy generation and procurement requirements for the state's electric distribution utilities and electric service companies (hereafter referred to as utilities). This definition encompasses all retail electricity providers except municipal utilities and electric cooperatives. Under the standard, utilities must provide 25% of their retail electricity supply from alternative energy resources by 2025, with specific annual benchmarks for renewable and solar energy resources (see details below). Half of the standard can be met with “any new, retrofitted, refueled, or repowered generating facility located in Ohio,” including fossil fuels, making the renewables portion of the standard 12.5% renewables by 2025. '''<u>Eligible Alternative Energy Technologies</u>'''<br> In order to qualify under the standard, all advanced energy and renewable energy facilities must have a placed-in-service date of January 1, 1998, or later. The Public Utilities Commission of Ohio (PUCO) is authorized to classify any new technology as an advanced energy or renewable energy resource.<br> '''''Renewable Energy Resources'''''<br> Eligible renewable resources are defined to include the following technologies: solar photovoltaics (PV), solar thermal technologies used to produce electricity, wind, geothermal, biomass, biologically derived methane gas, landfill gas, certain non-treated waste biomass products, solid waste (as long as the process to convert it to electricity does not include combustion), fuel cells that generate electricity, certain storage facilities, and qualified hydroelectric facilities.* In 2012, S.B. 315 and S.B. 289 added certain cogeneration and waste heat recovery system technologies that meet specific requirements. A waste heat recovery or cogeneration system may qualify for either the Renewable Energy Resource Standard or the Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard. Distributed generation systems used by customers to generate electricity using the aforementioned eligible renewable resources are also included. <br> '''''Advanced Energy Resources'''''<br> Generally, advanced energy resources are defined as any process or technology that increases the generation output of an electric generating facility without additional carbon dioxide emissions. The definition of advanced energy resources explicitly includes clean coal; generation III advanced nuclear power; distributed combined heat and power (CHP); fuel cells that generate electricity; certain solid waste conversion technologies; and demand side management or energy efficiency improvements. Additionally, new or existing mercantile customer-sited advanced energy resources and renewable energy resources that the customer commits into a utility's demand-response, energy efficiency or peak demand programs are also eligible “advanced energy” resources. This designation generally includes any advanced or renewable technology that would be eligible if it were owned by a utility, but is also specifically includes waste heat resources, energy storage technologies, and resources that improve the relationship between real and reactive power. In 2012, S.B. 315 added a provision that allows any new, retrofitted, refueled, or repowered generating facility in Ohio to qualify as an advanced energy resource.<br> '''<u>AEPS Compliance</u>''' <br> '''''Annual Obligation'''''<br> A utility's obligation under the Alternative Energy Portfolio Standard (AEPS) is calculated using the average of a utility's total retail sales (sold under standard service offer) during the preceding three calendar years as a baseline. At least 50% of the renewable energy requirement must be met by in-state facilities, and the remaining 50% with resources that can be shown to be deliverable into the state. The renewable benchmarks begin in 2009 and increase annually towards an eventual target of 12.5% of retail electricity sales (kWh) by 2024 and thereafter. Utilities are required to file a [http://www.puco.ohio.gov/puco/index.cfm/industry-information/industry-topics/alternative-energy-portfolio-status-reports-2010/ compliance report] by April 15 of each year. These reports must allow and consider public comments. PUCO in turn must review reports and report back to the General Assembly on a yearly basis. The 2012 PUCO report is available [http://dis.puc.state.oh.us/DocumentRecord.aspx?DocID=deaba2a9-7c7d-43f7-ae62-f5bd2ed69a72 here] and covers compliance years 2009 and 2010.<br> '''''Solar Carve Out'''''<br> The requirement also contains a carve-out for solar-energy resources with an ultimate solar target of 0.5% of the total electricity supply in 2024 and thereafter. The total renewable percentage requirement ''includes'' the solar specific portion (i.e., the solar requirement is not added on top of the specified renewables requirement). The detailed schedule of annual compliance benchmarks appears below. The law does not identify annual benchmarks for the overall alternative energy standard.<br> <div style="page-break-inside: avoid;"> <table border="1"> <tr> <th>Year </th> <th>Renewable (%) Benchmark</th> <th>Solar (%) Benchmark</th></tr> <tr> <td>2009</td> <td>0.25</td> <td>0.004</td></tr> <tr> <td>2010</td> <td>0.5</td> <td>0.010</td></tr> <tr> <td>2011</td> <td>1.0</td> <td>0.030</td></tr> <tr> <td>2012</td> <td>1.5</td> <td>0.060</td></tr> <tr> <td>2013</td> <td>2.0</td> <td>0.090</td></tr> <tr> <td>2014</td> <td>2.5</td> <td>0.12</td></tr> <tr> <td>2015</td> <td>3.5</td> <td>0.15</td></tr> <tr> <td>2016</td> <td>4.5</td> <td>0.18</td></tr> <tr> <td>2017</td> <td>5.5</td> <td>0.22</td></tr> <tr> <td>2018</td> <td>6.5</td> <td>0.26</td></tr> <tr> <td>2019</td> <td>7.5</td> <td>0.30</td></tr> <tr> <td>2020</td> <td>8.5</td> <td>0.34</td></tr> <tr> <td>2021</td> <td>9.5</td> <td>0.38</td></tr> <tr> <td>2022</td> <td>10.5</td> <td>0.42</td></tr> <tr> <td>2023</td> <td>11.5</td> <td>0.46</td></tr> <tr> <td>2024+</td> <td>12.5</td> <td>0.50</td></tr></table></div> '''''Renewable Energy Credits (RECs)''''' The annual benchmark obligations may be met through the purchase of qualified renewable energy credits (RECs), which are defined as the environmental attributes associated with one megawatt hour of electricity generated by a renewable energy resource. Under the standard, RECs have a lifetime of five years following their acquisition. The utility utilizing RECs for compliance must be a registered member with PJM’s generation attribute tracking system (GATS) and/or Midwest Independent Transmission System Operator (MISO) generation attribute tracking system, and/or other credible tracking system PUCO subsequently approves. Only RECs generated after the effective date of S.B. 221 (July 31, 2008) may be used for compliance.<br> '''''Annual Review and Alternative Compliance Payments (ACP)'''''<br> PUCO is also tasked with annually reviewing compliance with the renewable and solar energy benchmarks and imposing penalties if the benchmarks are not met. The alternative compliance payment (ACP) for the renewable portion is initially set at $45/megawatt-hour (MWh) but will be adjusted annually by PUCO according to the federal Consumer Price Index, although it will never be less than $45/MWh. The Solar Alternative Compliance Payment (SACP) is set at $450/MWh in 2009, reduced to $400/MWh in 2010 and 2011, and will be reduced by $50 every two years thereafter to a minimum of $50/MWh in 2024. Compliance payments will be deposited into the Ohio Advanced Energy Fund, which provides financial support to renewable energy and energy efficiency projects within the state. Utilities may not pass along the cost of compliance payments to their customers. <br> The law contains clauses for cost limitations and allowances for non-compliance for reasons beyond a utility's control (i.e., force majeure). Utilities are not required to comply with the annual benchmarks if it is "reasonably expected" to raise their costs by 3% or more above what they would have otherwise been.** The PUCO may require the utility to make solicitations for renewable energy resource credits before the utility may request a force majeure determination. PUCO is authorized to reduce a utility's obligation under the standard if it receives a petition for such treatment from the utility and determines that resources sufficient to meet the obligation are not reasonably available. Under these circumstances a utility may be required to make up the shortfall with additional purchases in subsequent years.<br> '''<u>[http://dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=OH16R&re=1&ee=1 Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard]</u>'''<br> S.B. 221 also requires utilities to implement energy efficiency and peak demand reduction programs that achieve a cumulative energy savings of 22% by the end of 2025, and reduce peak demand by 1.0% in 2009 and 0.75% annually thereafter through 2018. These requirements are separate and distinct from the Alternative Energy Resource Standard. ''*In order to be considered a renewable resource for the purposes of the renewable resource standard, a hydroelectric facility must meet a series of requirements regarding its environmental impact. However, these requirements do not include a size limitation (e.g., 30 MW) of the type frequently found in state RPS laws.'' ''**S.B. 232 made a slight amendment to this cost limitation provision. ''
    ment to this cost limitation provision. ''  +
  • '''''Note: Maine's PACE program is accepti
    '''''Note: Maine's PACE program is accepting applications from homeowners in participating municipalities. Applications are submitted online.'''''<br> <br> Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing allows property owners to borrow money to pay for energy improvements. The amount borrowed is repaid via a special assessment on the property over a period of years. Maine has authorized local governments to establish such programs. Not all local governments in Maine will choose to offer PACE financing, check the program to see if your municipality has begun offering the program (over 160 locations are participating, Efficiency Maine maintains an up to date list). If your town is not participating, contact your community leaders directly.<br> <br> The following eligibility requirements apply: * Homeowners must have a debt-to-income ratio of 45% or less * Property taxes and sewer charges must be up to date * The property is not subject to a reverse mortgage * The property may not have any outstanding notice of default, foreclosure, or delinquency on the mortgage * The homeowner must have at least as much equity in the home as the amount of PACE loan To participate, the homeowner must select a participating energy advisor and receive an energy audit. The home energy audit must be conducted to determine the recommended improvements which may include energy-efficiency meaures and renewable-energy systems. Energy-efficiency measures generally must meet or exceed U.S. EPA and Energy Star standards, or other standards approved by Efficiency Maine Trust, or weatherization improvements that are approved by the Trust. Improvements that are recommended by the Energy Audit may be authorized. Renewable-energy systems and electrical-thermal storage systems must meet standards approved by the Trust.<br> <br> Note that certain improvements may be eligible for rebates as well. After the energy audit, the homeowner receives pre-approval for the PACE loan by submitting an application online and selects a contractor from a registered vendor list.
    contractor from a registered vendor list.  +
  • '''''Note: NC GreenPower issued an RFP in
    '''''Note: NC GreenPower issued an RFP in December 2013, seeking up to 20,000 MWh of renewable energy credits (RECs) through a purchase with either a one or two year term. Green power is defined for NC GreenPower as renewable energy generated in North Carolina by solar photovoltaics, wind, small hydro of 10 MW or less, and biomass resources (methane from landfills, animal waste or agricultural waste, wood waste) which is delivered to North Carolina’s electrical supply. Bids in response to the RFP are due January 22, 2014. See the web site above for more information. ''''' NC GreenPower, a statewide green power program designed to encourage the use of renewable energy in North Carolina, offers production payments for grid-tied electricity generated by solar, wind, small hydro (10 megawatts or less) and biomass resources. Payment arrangements for electricity generated by most renewable energy systems may be available by submitting proposals for consideration when NC GreenPower issues an RFP. However, owners of small solar energy systems (5 kW or less) and small wind energy systems (10 kilowatts or less) may currently apply to receive program incentives at any time. Owners of small solar energy systems or wind-energy systems are encouraged to review and fill out an [http://www.ncgreenpower.org/types/form/index.php online application], available on the NC GreenPower web site. Note that customer-generators who choose to net meter are ''not'' eligible to participate in the NC GreenPower Program. Generators are required to enter into power-purchase agreements with their North Carolina electric utility and with NC GreenPower. However, because premiums paid to NC GreenPower are funded exclusively by voluntary contributions from North Carolina electric customers, NC GreenPower does not provide guaranteed contracts to generators. Production incentives are based on the amount expected to make the installation of renewable-energy systems approach economic feasibility. The incentives, which include payments from utility power-purchase agreements, are made on a per-kWh basis and vary by technology. Owners of small solar-electric systems enrolled in NC GreenPower receive $0.06/kilowatt-hour (kWh) from the program, plus approximately $0.04/kWh from their utility under the power-purchase agreement, for a total production payment of about $0.12/kWh. Owners of small wind-energy systems receive $0.09/kWh from the program, plus approximately $0.04/kWh from their utility, for a total production payment of about $0.13/kWh.* NC GreenPower is an independent, nonprofit organization created by state-government officials, electric utilities, nonprofit organizations, consumers, renewable-energy advocates and other stakeholders. It began operation in October 2003 as the first statewide green-power program in the United States. North Carolina's three investor-owned utilities -- Dominion North Carolina Power, Duke Energy and Progress Energy -- and many of the state's municipal utilities and electric cooperatives are participating in the NC GreenPower Program. ''* Some North Carolina utilities charge an interconnection fee of approximately $4.00 per month for systems under 10 kW.''
    $4.00 per month for systems under 10 kW.''  +
  • '''''Note: On January 2, 2014, Hawaii Revi
    '''''Note: On January 2, 2014, Hawaii Revised Statue ''''''''[http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/hrscurrent/Vol04_Ch0201-0257/HRS0235/HRS_0235-0012_0005.htm §235-12.5] regarding the taxation of renewable systems were adopted and became effective. An accompanying change in the Hawaii Administrative Rules ([http://files.hawaii.gov/tax/legal/har/har_235_12.pdf HAR 235-12.5]) ''''''clarifies how virtual and aggregated net metered systems are to be taxed. ''''''“Other solar energy systems installed and “placed in service” from January 1, 2013 through January 1, 2014 must adhere to [http://files.hawaii.gov/tax/legal/har_temp/STANDARD_version_RETITC.pdf §18-235-12.01T to 06T, Temporary Administrative Rules]. For more information and tax forms, visit the [http://tax.hawaii.gov/geninfo/renewable/ Hawaii Department of Taxation website.]''' Originally enacted in 1976, the Hawaii Energy Tax Credits allow individuals or corporations to claim an income tax credit of 20% of the cost of equipment and installation of a wind system and 35% of the cost of equipment and installation of a solar thermal or photovoltaic (PV) system.* <br> <br> For solar thermal water heating systems, the maximum allowable credits are as follows: * Single family residential property is eligible for a credit of 35% of the actual cost or $2,250, whichever is less; * Multi-family residential property is eligible for a credit of 35% of the actual cost or $350 per unit, whichever is less; and * Commercial property is eligible for a credit of 35% of the actual cost or $250,000, whichever is less. For photovoltaic systems, the maximum allowable credits are as follows: * Single family residential property is eligible for a credit of 35% of the actual cost or $5,000, whichever is less; if all or part of the system is used as a substitute renewable energy technology for the solar water heating requirement for new residential construction, the credit shall be reduced by thirty-five per cent of the actual system cost or $2,250, whichever is less; * Multi-family residential property is eligible for a credit of 35% of the actual cost or $350 per unit, whichever is less; and * Commercial property is eligible for a credit of 35% of the actual cost or $500,000, whichever is less. For wind powered energy systems the maximum allowable credits are as follows: * Single family residential property is eligible for a credit of 20% of the actual cost or $1,500, whichever is less; if all or part of the system is used as a substitute renewable energy technology for the solar water heating requirement for new residential construction, the credit shall be reduced by twenty per cent of the actual system cost or $1,500, whichever is less; * Multi-family residential property is eligible for a credit of 20% of the actual cost or $200 per unit, whichever is less; and * Commercial property is eligible for a credit of 20% of the actual cost or $500,000, whichever is less. For a system that is business property, it is important to note that the costs that exceed the amount allowable for the maximum energy tax credit may be used for the Capital Goods Excise tax credit. In addition, for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2005, the dollar amount of any utility rebate must be deducted from the cost of the qualifying system and its installation before applying the state tax credit. <br> <br> A new provision was added to the tax credits in June 2009, with the passage of SB 464. This legislation, effective July 1, 2009, allows the tax credit to be refundable under certain conditions. For solar energy systems, a taxpayer can reduce the eligible credit amount by 30%. If this reduced amount exceeds the amount of income taxes to be paid by the taxpayer, the excess credit will be refunded to the taxpayer. If the tax credit exceeds a tax payer’s income liability, the excess credit over liability may be used as a credit against the taxpayer’s income liability until exchausted. Taxpayers whose entire income is exempt or whose adjusted gross income is $20,000 or less (or $40,000 or less if filing jointly) may receive the tax credit as a refund.
    y) may receive the tax credit as a refund.  +
  • '''''Note: On July 10, 2013, the Clean Ene
    '''''Note: On July 10, 2013, the Clean Energy Development Fund Board approved changes to the Small Scale Renewable Energy Incentive Program, effective October 1, 2013. Beginning in October, wind turbines, commercial PV systems, and solar thermal space heating will no longer be eligible for incentives. The PV incentive levels, maximum, and system size caps will be decreased. A new wind grant program will replace the wind incentives. See the full details [http://publicservice.vermont.gov/sites/psd/files/Topics/Renewable_Energy/CEDF/Approved%20Changes%20to%20the%20Small%20Scale%20Renewable%20Energy%20Incentive%20Program%20%20-%20July%202013.pdf here]'''''. Vermont's Small Scale Renewable Energy Incentive Program, initiated in June 2003, provides funding for new solar water heating, solar electric (photovoltaic), and micro-hydro energy system installations. Currently in its seventh round of funding (almost $4.1 million dollars), the program is available to single- and multi-family residences, commercial and industrial businesses, farms, schools, builders/developers, and local & state governments. Vermont also allows third-party owned and leasing systems installed on residential property and less than 10 kW are considered residential leased systems; all other leased systems are considered commercial systems. In 2012, Vermont added an efficiency adder to encourage Vermonters to complete an audit or participate in specific efficiency programs (such as Energy Star Homes). Only systems installed by pre-approved installers will be eligible for funding. Funding must be reserved and applications approved before expenditures are made. Once solar (PV or Water Heating) reservations are granted, applicants have six months to complete their projects and submit the final application. Current incentives are as follows: '''<u>Solar Photovoltaic (PV)</u>''' For systems that generate at least 1,000 kWh/year per kW of rated DC capacity installed: * Residential PV: $0.25/Watt (W) generating capacity (DC) up to 10 kilowatts (kW). Total maximum incentive is $2,500. An additional efficiency adder may be available: $0.15/W (cap: $350). * Special Category (low-income housing non-profits, municipalities, public schools) PV: $1.25/W DC up to 10 kW, up to $12,500 or 50% of total installed cost. Efficiency adder: $0.15/W (cap: $450). Systems that generate less than 1,000 kWh/year per kW of rated DC capacity may be eligible for a lower, pro-rated incentive payment.<br> <br> '''<u>Solar Hot Water</u>''' * Residential Solar Hot Water: $1.50/100 British thermal unit/day (Btu/d) up to 200 kBtu/d, up to $3,000. efficiency adder of $0.50/100Btu/day ($350 cap). * Commercial Solar Hot Water: $1.50/100 Btu/d up to 200 kBtu/d, up to $16,500. Efficiency adder of $0.55/100Btu/day ($450 cap). * Special Category Solar Hot Water: $3.00/100 Btu/d up to 1,500 kBtu/d, up to $45,000 or 50% of total installed cost. efficiency adder of $0.55/100Btu/day ($450 cap). Solar Hot Water incentives are available for public swimming pools for Special Category customers only. '''<u>Micro hydro</u>''' * Residential and Commercial: $1.75/3ft-gal/min up to $8,750. * Special Category: $3.00/3ft-gal/min up to $17,500 or 50% of total installed costs. <br> Systems greater than 10 kW may be eligible for the incentive but must first submit a Certificate of Public Good application as submitted to the Public Service Board. For more information on the program, eligible installers, remaining funds, and installations to date, visit the official program web site.<br>
    t the official program web site.<br>  +
  • '''''Note: On July 1st of 2014 the Green E
    '''''Note: On July 1st of 2014 the Green Energy Program PV rates changed.''''' The Green Energy Program actually consists of three separate programs: one for Delmarva Power & Light (DP&L), the state's only investor-owned utility; one for the state's municipal utilities; and one for the Delaware Electric Cooperative (DEC). The investor-owned utility program was established as part of The Electric Utility Restructuring Act of 1999, and is supported under Delaware's public benefits program, the [http://www.dsireusa.org/library/includes/incentive2.cfm?Incentive_Code=DE01R&state=DE&CurrentPageID=1 Delmarva Power Green Energy Fund.] Under the program, incentives are available for the installation of qualifying photovoltaic (PV), solar water heating, wind turbine, fuel cell, and geothermal heat pump systems. The Fund may also be used to support energy efficiency education programs. The program has recently been revised to allow projects financed using third-party power purchase agreements (PPAs). Grant eligibility and terms for PPA projects are determined by the eligibility of the project owner. Grant reservation request forms and interconnection requirements and forms may be downloaded from the Web site shown above.<br> <br> Under the investor-owned program, 40% of rebate funding is available for residential customers and 60% of funding is available for non-residential customers, including energy efficiency education programs.* The total of all grants may not exceed 65% of the total annual revenue collected for the Delmarva Power Green Energy Fund. Incentive terms vary by technology, system size and sector as follows:<br> <br> '''Solar PV, Wind''' * PV system capacity is limited to 50 kilowatts (kW) per installation address (regardless of the number of meters or systems installed at that address). Systems larger than 50 kW do not qualify for an incentive. * General Incentive: $.85/W for first 5 kW and $0.25/W up to 50 kW. The maximum incentive is $15,000 for residential projects and $24,000 for non-residential systems. * Non-profit Incentive: $1.75/W for first 5 kW and $1.00/W up to 50 kW. The maximum incentive is $50,000 for non-profit systems. '''Solar Thermal (Domestic Hot Water, Radiant Heat)''' * General: $1.00 per annual kWh saved, up to $5,000 for residential systems and $10,000 for non-residential systems. * Non-profit: $2.00 per annual kWh saved up to $10,000. '''Geothermal Heat Pumps''' * General: $800/ton for first two tons and $700/ton for additional capacity, up to $5,000 for residential and $30,000 for non-residential systems. * Non-profit: $1,000/ton for the first two tons of and $800/ton for additional capacity, up to $30,000. '''Fuel Cells''' * '''Incentive levels are currently under review by program administrators.''' Previously, the incentive was set at 50% of installed costs, up to $22,500 for residential systems and $250,000 for non-residential systems. All systems must be installed by a participating contractor and carry a full five-year warranty. Beginning December 10, 2010 energy audits will be required for all existing buildings prior to grant approval. In addition, for projects undertaken as part of new construction, the building will have to be Energy Star certified in order to qualify for incentives. For further details on systems that qualify for rebates under this program, see the Green Energy Program Rules.<br> <br> To be eligible for funding consideration, an Energy Efficiency Information Program must encourage energy efficiency improvements through education, information, or promotion. Proposals may target groups of consumers, using outreach, communications, technical support, or analytical resources. Energy Efficiency Information Programs may include residential or nonresidential customers.<br> <br> *''S.B. 266 signed in July 2010 readjusts this allocation and requires that 60% of the funding support residential programs while 40% goes to non-residential.''
    grams while 40% goes to non-residential.''  +
  • '''''Note: On November 25th. 2014 the Flor
    '''''Note: On November 25th. 2014 the Florida PSC voted to end a solar pilot program at the end of 2015 that requires independently owned utilities to offer solar rebates. This program will not be offered after 2015. More information is available on FPL's'''''''''' [http://www.fpl.com/landing/solar_rebate/residential.shtml solar rebate web site].''''' Florida Power and Light (FPL) offers several incentives to encourage residential and business customers to install solar water heating and solar photovoltaic (PV) systems on eligible property. The program is open to all business and residential customers, however incentives are not guaranteed. Schools, non-profit organizations, and low-income housing providers are also eligible to participate in separate tailored offerings which are detailed on the program web site. Rebates are provided based on nameplate rating and only apply to systems which are properly certified according to program rules. Residential rebates are provided on a flat rate of $2 per DC watt nameplate rating for PV systems and $1,000 per system for solar water heating. Business customers who utilize eligible solar water heating systems are eligible for a rebate of $30 per 1,000 BTUh per day. The business rebate for PV systems provides $2 per DC watt nameplate rating for systems up to 10kW, a rebate of $1.50 per DC watt nameplate rating for systems 10kW - 25kW, and $1 per DC watt nameplate rating for all systems larger than 25 kW. Business customers may accrue rebates in a cumulative fashion, whereby a customer with a 30 kW system can receive $2 per DC watt for the first 10 kW of capacity, $1.50 per DC watt rebate for the next 15 kW and $1 per DC watt rebate for the final 5 kW. All collectors must be approved and certified by the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) and have an FSEC system certification number. There is no minimum or maximum size limit, other than the dollar limit on the rebate. Customers can go to the program web site listed above to reserve funds. There is no paper application and all communications for the program will be conducted via email. See the details of these targeted programs on the FAQ section of the program web site. To find out more about these incentives, as well as renewable energy programs such as [http://www.fpl.com/netmetering net metering], please visit the program web site.
    ering], please visit the program web site.  +
  • '''''Note: On November 4, 2008, Florida vo
    '''''Note: On November 4, 2008, Florida voters approved Amendment 3, which removes the 10-year duration of the exemption, although this applies only to residential property. The amendment also strikes the previous section in the state constitution that established the original guidance upon which the June 2008 law described below is based, thereby creating a possible contradiction that will need to be addressed.''''' In June 2008, Florida enacted legislation that revived a renewable energy property tax exemption that had previously expired in 1990. Under Florida law, improved real property upon which a renewable energy source device* is installed and operated is entitled to an exemption in the amount of the original cost of the device, including the installation cost. The exemption does not include the cost of replacing, removing or improving existing property in the course of the installation. Renewable energy devices must be installed on or after January 1, 2009, to qualify for the exemption, and the exemption will not be authorized for more than 10 years. If the renewable energy device was operative for less than a full calendar year preceding the taxpayer's exemption application, the exempt amount will be reduced proportionally. ''* The legislation states that a "renewable energy source device means any of the following equipment which, when installed in connection with a dwelling unit or other structure, collects, transmits, stores, or uses solar energy, wind energy, or energy derived from geothermal deposits: solar energy collectors; storage tanks and other storage systems, excluding swimming pools used as storage tanks; rockbeds; thermostats and other control devices; heat exchange devices; pumps and fans; roof ponds; freestanding thermal containers; pipes, ducts, refrigerant handling systems, and other equipment used to interconnect such systems (however, conventional backup systems of any type are not included in this definition); windmills; wind-driven generators; power conditioning and storage devices that use wind energy to generate electricity or mechanical forms of energy; pipes and other equipment used to transmit hot geothermal water to a dwelling or structure from a geothermal deposit."''
    or structure from a geothermal deposit."''  +
  • '''''Note: Ongoing proceedings related to
    '''''Note: Ongoing proceedings related to net metering can be found in Docket R-31417.''''' Louisiana enacted legislation in June 2003 establishing net metering. Modeled on Arkansas’s law, Louisiana's law requires investor-owned utilities, municipal utilities and electric cooperatives to offer net metering to customers that generate electricity using solar, wind, hydropower, geothermal or biomass resources. Fuel cells and microturbines that generate electricity entirely derived from renewable resources are also eligible. Per state law, net metering is available for residential systems up to 25 kilowatts (kW) in capacity, and commercial and agricultural systems up to 300 kW. In 2008 (Act 543), the state legislature increased the net metering limit from 100 kW to 300 kW for commercial and agricultural use. The Louisiana Public Service Commission (PSC) opened Docket R-31417 in July 2010 in order to review its rules to increase to the state-mandated 300 kW limit. The PSC approved the increase in May 2011. In July of 2011, the PSC adopted [http://www.dsireusa.org/documents/Incentives/LA02R1.pdf Net Metering Standards], after which the PSC will determine on a case-by-case basis the appropriate pricing of projects exceeding 300kW. The Louisiana PSC also established rates, terms and conditions for net metering for utilities under its jurisdiction in November 2005.* The PSC’s rules are described below. Utilities must provide customer-generators with a meter capable of measuring the flow of electricity in both directions. Utilities must pay for the cost of the meter itself, but customer-generators must pay a one-time charge to cover the installation cost of the meter. Net excess generation (NEG) is credited to the customer's next bill indefinitely. For the final month in which the customer takes service from the utility, the utility will pay the customer for the balance of any credit at the utility's avoided-cost rate. By the end of each calendar year, utilities must file with the PSC a report listing all existing net-metered systems and their capacities, and, where applicable, the inverter rating for each facility. The ownership of renewable-energy credits (RECs) associated with net metering has not been addressed. The PSC will revisit these rules once any utility's net metering purchases exceed .5% of its retail peak load. '''Additional Resources:'''<br> [http://www.entergy-louisiana.com/your_home/net_metering.aspx Entergy's net-metering webpage] ''* The PSC regulates investor-owned utilities and electric cooperatives in Louisiana; it does not regulate municipal-owned utilities, and its rules thereby do not apply to municipal utilities. Municipal utilities must develop their own programs based on the statute.''
    their own programs based on the statute.''  +
  • '''''Note: Ongoing proceedings related to
    '''''Note: Ongoing proceedings related to net metering can be found in [http://lpscstar.louisiana.gov/star/portal/lpsc/page/Dockets/portal.aspx Docket R-31417.]''''' The Louisiana Public Service Commission (PSC) adopted rules for net metering and interconnection in November 2005. Louisiana's rules, based on those in place in Arkansas, require publicly-owned utilities and rural electric cooperatives to offer net metering to customers with systems that generate electricity using solar, wind, hydropower, geothermal or biomass resources.* Fuel cells and microturbines that generate electricity entirely derived from renewable resources are also eligible. The rules apply to residential facilities with a maximum capacity of 25 kilowatts (kW) and commercial systems with a maximum capacity of 300 kW. In 2008 (Act 543), the state legislature increased the net metering and interconnection limit from 100 kW to 300 kW for commercial and agricultural use. The PSC opened Docket R-31417 in July 2010 in order to review its rules to increase to the state-mandated 300 kW limit. The PSC approved the increase in May 2011. Utilities must provide customers with a meter capable of measuring the flow of electricity in both directions. Although utilities must pay for the cost of the meter itself, customer-generators must pay a one-time charge to cover the installation cost of the meter. Interconnected systems must meet all safety and performance standards established by local and national electric codes, including the National Electric Code (NEC), the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), the National Electrical Safety Code (NESC), and Underwriters Laboratories (UL). A manual external disconnect switch is required for all interconnected systems. The manual external disconnect switch requirement is waived if the inverter is designed to shut down in the event that utility service is lost, the inverter is warranted by the manufacturer to shut down in this situation, and the inverter has been inspected and tested by utility personnel. Customers seeking to interconnect and net meter must submit an interconnection agreement to a utility 45 days prior to interconnection. Utilities must use a PSC-approved standard interconnection agreement for interconnected facilities. Customers must pay for "interconnection costs," defined as "the reasonable costs of connection, switching, metering, transmission, distribution, safety provisions and administrative costs incurred by the electric utility directly related to the installation and maintenance of the physical facilities necessary to permit interconnected operations with a net-metering facility, to the extent the costs are in excess of the corresponding costs which the electric utility would have incurred if it had not engaged in interconnected operations, but instead generated an equivalent amount of electric energy itself or purchased an equivalent amount of electric energy or capacity from other sources." Furthermore, following notice and opportunity for public comment, the PSC may authorize a utility to assess customer-generators "a greater fee or customer charge, of any type, if the electric utility's direct costs of interconnection and administration of net metering outweigh the distribution system, environmental and public-policy benefits of allocating the costs among the electric utility's entire customer base." '''Additional Resources:''' [http://www.entergy-louisiana.com/content/net_metering/ELL_Interconnection_Agreement_Net_Metering.pdf Entergy Standard Interconnection Agreement] ''* The PSC regulates investor-owned utilities and electric cooperatives in Louisiana; it does not regulate municipal-owned utilities, and its rules do not apply to municipal utilities. Municipal utilities must develop their own programs based on the statute.''
    their own programs based on the statute.''  +
  • '''''Note: Oregon Department of Energy (OD
    '''''Note: Oregon Department of Energy (ODOE) filed permanent rules for the Residential Energy Tax Credit on November 18, 2014. The filed rules will take effect January 1, 2015, and will change requirements and incentive amounts for currently eligible technologies, as well as add storage gas water heaters and direct vent natural gas or propane fireplaces as eligible technologies. For more information on the new rules, refer to the ''''''''''[http://www.oregon.gov/energy/CONS/Pages/Rulemaking-RETC.aspx?panel=1 ODOE website]''''''''''. The summary here reflects the rules and incentives in effect through the end of 2014. ''''' Homeowners, renters and third-party owners who pay Oregon income taxes are eligible for the Residential Energy Tax Credit (RETC) if they purchase premium-efficiency heating systems, duct systems, premium efficiency wood and pellet stoves, geothermal space heating, premium efficiency water heaters, solar water and space heating systems, photovoltaic systems, wind systems, fuel cells, or alternative fuel vehicle infrastructure. Third-party owned systems are eligible for the tax credit, though specific requirements detailed in the administrative rules must be met. <br> '''Renewable Energy Incentives'''<br> Photovoltaic (PV) systems installed on or after January 1, 2014 are eligible for $1.90 per peak watt (W) with a maximum limit of $6,000, up to 50% of the net cost. The net cost is calculated after taking any state incentives. The amount claimed in any one tax year may not exceed $1,500 or the taxpayer's tax liability, whichever is less. Unused credits may be carried forward for five years. As of January 1, 2011, residents that are leasing a solar system are also eligible for the tax credit.<br> <br> Solar space and water heating systems are eligible for a credit of $0.60 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) saved during the first year, up to $1,500. Fuel cells are eligible for a credit of $3.00 per W of installed capacity, up to $6,000 or 50% of total costs. Fuell cell systems must have a minimum rated stack capacity of 0.5 kilowatts (kW) and a maximum rated system capacity of 10 kW.<br> <br> Spa and pool heating systems are eligible for a tax credit of $0.15 per kWh saved, up to 50% of the cost, with a maximum tax credit of $1,500.<br> <br> Ground source heat pump installations or upgrades and wood and pellet stoves are eligible for a credit of $0.60 per kWh saved, up to $1,500. For heat pumps, the system COP must be at least 3.3 for closed loop systems and 3.5 for direct expansion.<br> <br> Wind turbine systems that produce electricity are eligible for a credit equal to the lesser of $2 per kWh produced during the first year, or $6,000. The incentive is based on actual system production. Wind systems must meet specific requirements for minimum production, tower height, and wind speed, among other requirements. Systems must produce an average of 100 kWh per month, at a minimum, towers must be a minimum of 70 feet, and systems must have a minimum annual average wind speed of 10 miles per hour at hub height. Alternative fuel devices include facilities for mixing, storing, compressing, or dispensing fuels and equipment used to recharge or refuel alternative fuel vehicles. They are eligible for a 25% tax credit, not to exceed $750. Eligible fuels include electricity, natural gas, ethanol, methanol, propane, or other approved fuels. Premium efficiency biomass combustion devices include wood or pellet stoves, and are eligible for a tax credit based on the efficiency improvements above the RETC minimum efficiency rating. The credit is equal to $0.60 per kWh of energy savings.<br> <br> '''Energy Efficiency Incentives'''<br> Only technologies recognized as premium efficiency by the Oregon Department of Energy are eligible for the tax credit. The Oregon Department of Energy maintains a list of qualifying technologies. The tax credit is $0.60 per first-year energy savings in kWh up to $1,500. Heat pump water heaters must the Northern Climate specification established by the Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance in order to qualify for the tax credit. '''History'''<br> Previously, this credit was scheduled to expire in 2012, but HB 3672 (2011) extended the expiration date of the tax credit to January 1, 2018, with the exception of the alternative fuels vehicle portion of the tax credit, which ended as scheduled January 1, 2012. Previously, the RETC offered incentives for appliances such as dishwashers, clothes washers, refrigerators, plus air conditioners and boilers. However, HB 3672 excluded these technologies as of January 1, 2012. Though eligibility for alternative fuel vehicles expired January 1, 2012, alternative vehicle infrastructure projects, including fueling or charging devices, are eligible as of January 1, 2012.
    vices, are eligible as of January 1, 2012.  +
  • '''''Note: Palo Alto City Council approved
    '''''Note: Palo Alto City Council approved a proposal to extend and amend this program in December 2012. The new changes took effect on January 2, 2013. The utility will accept applications for the CLEAN program at the start of every month. Contracts will be awarded on a monthly basis at the end of every month throughout 2013 until it has awarded contracts to a total of 2 megawatts (MW) of projects.''''' City Palo Alto Utility's Clean Local Energy Accessible Now (CLEAN) program provides fixed payments for electricity produced by approved photovoltaic systems over a fixed period of time. This type of program is commonly referred to as a feed-in tariff. Originally, the program allowed participants to choose between 10-year, 15-year and 20-year contracts. As of January 2, 2013, the only option is a 20-year contract for a price of $0.165 per kilowatt-hour (kWh). There is no minimum or maximum system size to participate. The solar generating facility may be located anywhere in Palo Alto city limits as long as it complies with all City codes and interconnection requirements. Systems may be ground-mounted, roof-mounted, or mounted on carports, though the utility recommends investigating the codes and requirements applicable to the site prior to submitting an application. Applicants must submit a reservation deposit of $20 per kW. Winning projects will have one year to complete construction. If the project is completed within the year, the deposit will be returned to the applicant. Projects that take longer to become operational may sacrifice a portion of their deposit. See the program web site listed above for more information on this program.
    bove for more information on this program.  +
  • '''''Note: Phase I of the program closed J
    '''''Note: Phase I of the program closed June 7, 2013. Phase II information will be posted when it is available. The below information is for Phase I only. Check the program website for more details.''''' First Energy Utilities (MetEd, Penelec, Penn Power) in Pennsylvania provide rebates to residential customers for purchasing and installing qualifying solar water heating systems. Eligible systems may receive a rebate of up to $500. Applications must include a dated sales receipt from the contractor and a copy of the Solar Rating and Certification Corporation (SRCC) certificate indicating SRCC OG-100 certification. Application forms, terms and conditions, and a list of eligible systems are available on the program website.
    tems are available on the program website.  +
  • '''''Note: Program Year 5 is now in progre
    '''''Note: Program Year 5 is now in progress. Project implementation must begin by May 31, 2013. All measures must be implemented by March 31, 2014. '''''<br> The Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO) Bureau of Energy and Recycling administers the public sector energy efficiency programs required by the Illinois Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard (EEPS). As part of this larger program and the Illinois EEPS, the DCEO funds the Illinois Smart Energy Design Assistance Center (SEDAC) to administer and execute the Public Sector Building Retro-Commissioning (RCx) Program throughout Illinois. This program is limited to ComEd and Ameren Illinois electric service territories, though entities receiving natural gas from Ameren Illinois, Nicor, North Shore, or Peoples Gas may also be eligible for inclusion of natural gas savings measures. SEDAC's Retro-Commissioning services are free for local, state, and federal governments; public school districts; community colleges; and universities that receive electricity distribution service from Commonwealth Edison (ComEd) or Ameren affiliated utilities (AmerenCILCO, AmerenIP, and AmerenCIPS) as a result of Illinois DCEO funding. Clients are required to implement at least $10,000 on building improvements based on recommendations, and must implement the measures within 10 months or by the program year deadline. SEDAC is managed by the School of Architecture at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
    niversity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.  +
  • '''''Note: Rebates for residential photovo
    '''''Note: Rebates for residential photovoltaic (PV) systems are reportedly no longer available. ''''' PPL Electric Utilities is offering rebates to its non-profit and government customers that install photovoltaic (PV) systems, and residential, non-profit, and government customers that install geothermal heat pump systems on properties which they own. Residential eligibility is limited to the geothermal heat pump portion of the program and to single-family homes that receive service in the RS, RTS (R) or TOU rate classes. The non-profit and government designation includes schools, colleges or universities, and all levels of government in any rate class. Both new construction and existing buildings are eligible for PV or geothermal heat pump rebates. Rebates for PV installations are set at $2.00 per watt (DC) up to a maximum of $500,000 per non-profit or government customer/parent organization. Rebates for geothermal heat pumps are set at $217 per ton up to $1,200 per residential customer; $6,510 per non-profit/gov't customer; and $30,000 per non-profit/gov't parent organization. All systems and components must be new in order to qualify for a rebate. The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), which administers the state Pennsylvania Sunshine solar rebate program, has issued a policy statement stating that projects which receive a solar rebate from the PPL program described below are generally not eligible for the Pennsylvania Sunshine program. However, the DEP has also identified certain circumstances where participation in both programs would be permitted. Click [http://files.dep.state.pa.us/Energy/Energy%20Independence/EnergyIndPortalFiles/solar/PA%20Sunshine%20Program_Double%20dipping.pdf here] to view the DEP's statement. The current program is retroactive to systems installed on or after July 1, 2009. The current applications have an expiration date of May 31, 2011.
    s have an expiration date of May 31, 2011.  +
  • '''''Note: Rebates will be availabile on J
    '''''Note: Rebates will be availabile on January 6th, 2015 at 10 A.M. and are expected to be claimed on a first-come, first-serve basis within minutes.''''' <div> '''''On November 25th. 2014 the Florida PSC voted to end a solar pilot program at the end of 2015 that requires independently owned utilities to offer solar rebates. This program will not be offered after December 31st, 2015.''''' </div> Tampa Electric provides financial incentives to customers who install solar-energy systems on their homes and businesses. Customers who install eligible solar water heating systems may receive a rebate of $1,000. Customers who install photovoltaic (PV) systems may receive a rebate of $2 per watt, with a maximum rebate of $20,000. Prior to system installation, program participants must allow Tampa Electric to perform an energy audit on the home or building.<br> <br> Tampa Electric has budgeted $1.5 million per year for this program from 2011 through 2015. The utility will approve applications every year on a first-come, first-served basis until funding is exhausted. See program web site for more information.
    See program web site for more information.  +
  • '''''Note: Residents affected by Hurricane
    '''''Note: Residents affected by Hurricane Sandy are eligible for an additional rebate of $200 for qualifying heat pumps, geothermal heat pumps, and air conditioners purchased on or after October 29, 2012. Rebates for central air conditioners will no longer be available after February 24, 2013, except for areas impacted by Hurricane Sandy. See the program web site for certification information. ''''' The COOLAdvantage Program’s objective is to improve the energy efficiency of new electric air conditioners and heat pumps. To promote both the sale of energy efficient units and proper installation techniques, the N.J. Clean Energy Program offers rebates for properly sized and installed high efficiency systems. In order to qualify for a rebate, the unit must meet a minimum energy efficient standard, based on its SEER, EER or HSPF ratings. <strong>Customers of Atlantic City Electric, Jersey Central Power and Light, PSE&G and Rockland Electric Company are generally eligible to apply for this rebate; however, effective July 1, 2012 funding is also available for oil, propane, and municipal electric utility customers.</strong> This aspect of the program will continue until available funding is exhausted or until June 30, 2013. Builders of new homes are not eligible to participate in the CoolAdvantage program but are encouraged to participate in the Energy Star Homes Program. As of July 27, 2012 current rebate amounts are set at $500 per system for air conditioners, heat pumps, and geothermal heat pumps.
    rs, heat pumps, and geothermal heat pumps.  +
  • '''''Note: See the program web site for in
    '''''Note: See the program web site for information regarding future solicitations. ''''' Wisconsin Focus on Energy offers a competitive grant to support the deployment of large renewable energy projects. Grant recipients and projects must be located in a participating electric or gas utility's service territory. The program web site above contains an interactive tool to assist people in determining their eligibility for different programs. '''2014 Program Year''' The program did not have a budget for 2014. However, the grant amount increased from 40% - 50% of total project costs. Maximum incentive amounts for eligible technologies remains the same. See the '''''[https://focusonenergy.com/business/renewable-energy program website]''''' for information on grant recipients this year. '''2013 Program Year''' Eligible technologies for the 2013 grants include biomass, biogas, geothermal, solar photovoltaics, solar thermal, and wind technologies. Grants are available for between 10% and 40% of eligible projects costs, with a minimum award of $5,000. Required payback periods and grant maximums vary by technology and are outlined below. Focus on Energy has allocated $9 million for the competitive grant program for 2013, with 75% reserved for Group One technologies (biogas, biomass, and geothermal) and 25% reserved for Group Two (solar PV, solar thermal, and wind). {
    {  +
  • '''''Note: Solar thermal rebates are curre
    '''''Note: Solar thermal rebates are currently only available to National Grid natural gas customers in Metro New York. Please visit the program website and use their Incentive Locator tool to verify that you qualify for a rebate. ''''' National Grid provides funding support to commercial and industrial customers who install solar thermal technologies. Recommended solar thermal applications include solar hot water heating, and in some cases solar space heating or high temperature process applications. For categorization purposes, the programs are considered to be custom energy efficiency measures for qualifying businesses. National Grid requires a free energy audit to interested participants to identify appropriate solar thermal technologies as well as estimated natural gas savings. Commercial and industrial customers receive a one-time rebate of $3 per therm of estimated first-year savings, up to 50% of the project costs or $100,000 per project. Eligibility requirements are in place to ensure quality installation of solar thermal systems. Funding for the program is limited. For further information please visit the program website or contact National Grid using the information below.
    National Grid using the information below.  +
  • '''''Note: Specific funding opportunities
    '''''Note: Specific funding opportunities may change from year to year depending on the focus area for that year.''''' The Michigan Economic Development Corporation's ''(''MEDC) Michigan Energy Office provides funding for renewable energy activities on a recurring basis, subject to availability of funds. Eligible projects may include activities such as providing education/outreach and technical assistance to communities and businesses on renewable energy topics, feasibility studies, demonstrations of commercially available renewable energy technologies, and/or other activities that promote renewable energy as a tool for economic development in the state. Grant award amounts vary according to each individual solicitation. Those interested in participating should contact Tania Howard at the MEDC’s Michigan Energy Office for additional grant and application details
    r additional grant and application details  +
  • '''''Note: Starting from October 14, 2014,
    '''''Note: Starting from October 14, 2014, installation that are replacing existing geothermal unit will not be eligible for $3,000 grant. Replacement for geothermal pumps will only qualify for $500 grant. ''''' '''''Effective from November 14, 2013, grants for leased residential solar PV systems has been discontinued. ''''' Maryland's Residential Clean Energy Grant Program, administered by the Maryland Energy Administration (MEA), provides financial incentives to homeowners that install solar water-heating, solar-electric (PV), and Geothermal heating and cooling systems. In order to be eligible, the property must be the applicant's primary residence.<br> <br> The current Clean Energy Grant Program provides incentives as follows: {
    es as follows: {  +
  • '''''Note: The ''''''''''SolarGenerations
    '''''Note: The ''''''''''SolarGenerations Program, ''''''''''WindGenerations Program, and HydroGenerations Program began accepting applications on August 13, 2014. ''''' The SolarGenerations Rebate Program was established in 2003 as a result of AB 431 ("the Solar Energy Systems Demonstration Program") and began accepting applications in August 2004. The program was subsequently amended nuerous times and rebates are now available for grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) and small wind systems installed on residences, small businesses, large commercial/industrial facilities, public buildings, low-income housing, non-profits and schools; and small hydroelectric systems installed at grid-connected agricultural sites and tribal entities. Participants must be current Nevada customers of NV Energy to participate. '''SolarGenerations''' Customers may install PV systems sized to meet 100% of their annual energy needs up to a maximum of 500 kilowatts (kW). Systems 25 kW and smaller will receive an Up-Front Incentive (UFI) based on the system's size. The incentive payment may not exceed 50% of the average installation cost per watt of 25 kW and smaller solar systems installed in the SolarGenerations Program in the quarter prior to application. This average is published quarterly by NV Energy on the SolarGenerations website. Systems larger than 25 kW will receive a Performance Based Incentive (PBI), paid quarterly for five years, based on the actual electricity produced by the system. '''SolarGenerations Incentives as of 08/13/14''' {
    08/13/14''' {  +
  • '''''Note: The 2011 application window for
    '''''Note: The 2011 application window for this program has expired. The information provided below is for reference only.''''' The Texas Department of Rural Affairs (TDRA) offers grants of up to $1.5 million to qualified local governments that use wind turbines to desalinate brackish ground water. Qualifying local governments are limited to incorporated Texas cities with less than 50,000 residents and counties with less than 200,000 residents. Desalinated groundwater should be used to help meet the drinking water needs of a rural community. In order to qualify for a grant, applicants should demonstrate the community's need to desalinate brackish groundwater and the absence of other viable long-term viable drinking water sources. In general, eligible projects must use wind generated electricity to power a reverse osmosis or other desalination facility or to help pump brackish groundwater for treatment. Projects must produce at least 20,000 gallons of water per day. The project must demonstrate the ability to be scaled up (e.g., larger wind turbines, expanded desalination facilities) towards a goal of eventually providing a majority of community drinking water needs. Consideration will also be given to projects that enhance the performance of existing wind power/groundwater desalination systems. Such enhancements may include but are not limited to improved system controls, energy storage and recovery, the incorporation of other renewable electricity sources, or reduced impact concentrate disposal techniques. Grants will be awarded on a competitive basis according to an evaluation structure which considers: * Type of project (i.e., using wind power for desalination of brackish groundwater) * Prospects for wider application or duplication in other rural areas * Demonstrated lack of drinking water sources other than brackish groundwater and adequate brackish groundwater resource * Long-term cost/benefits and relationship to state renewable energy goals (e.g., expected energy savings) * Partnerships and collaborations with other entities focusing on promoting renewables * Leveraging of other funding sources (i.e., level of matching funds) * Location in rural areas The Texas legislature has authorized funding for this program for Fiscal Years 2010 and 2011. The 2011 solicitation for this program had a deadline of December 17, 2010 with a total Fiscal Year 2011 budget of $3 million. Please see the program website for application information and a detailed program guide describing additional funding requirements.
    escribing additional funding requirements.  +
  • '''''Note: The Arizona Corporation Commiss
    '''''Note: The Arizona Corporation Commission (ACC) is in the process of modifying some elements of this program. When the ACC issues their final order it is expected that the up-front incentive for residential and commercial photovoltaics (PV) will be reduced to $0.10 per watt and the incentive for solar water heating will be reduced to $0.40 per equivalent kilowatt-hour (kWh). The summary below reflects the program as it was available in 2012. ''''' Through the Renewable Incentive Program, UniSource Energy Services (UES) offers customers who install various renewable energy sources the opportunity to sell the credits associated with the energy generated to UES. Previously, UES only provided incentives for solar technologies, but they expanded the list of qualified renewables in 2008 to include all technologies eligible for Arizona's [[Renewable Energy Standard (RES)]]. The solar technologies eligible for a rebate include photovoltaic (PV), solar hot water, solar HVAC and solar daylighting systems. Up-front incentives for PV may be de-rated based on expected performance. As of May 15, 2012, renewable energy systems are eligible for the following credit amounts: * '''Residential photovoltaics (PV):''' Funding has been depleted for 2012 * '''Non-residential PV (up to 70 kW-AC):''' Funding has been depleted for 2012 * '''Non-residential PV (greater than 70 kW-AC):''' Production-based incentive (PBI) on a 10, 15 or 20 year contract. * '''Residential solar water heating and space heating systems:''' $0.50/kWh (up-front incentive), up to $1,750 * '''Small commercial solar water heating and space heating systems:''' $0.50/kWh (up-front incentive), up to $200,000 * '''Large commercial solar water heating systems: '''Performance-based incentive * '''Solar space cooling systems (non-residential only):''' The incentive for the thermal energy delivered for cooling by a solar HVAC system is based on actual performance and ranges between $0.104/kWh-equivalent and $0.116.kWh equivalent. In addition, systems that incorporate solar thermal heating and/or solar thermal water heating are eligible for the large solar water heating PBI. * '''Grid tied residential and commercial wind (less than 1 MW):''' $1.25/W * '''Solar Daylighting (non-residential only):''' $0.18/kWh anticipated first year savings. * '''Other renewables''' installed by non-residential customers can apply to receive a PBI. Funds are assigned through a reservation process. All necessary forms can be downloaded from the program website.<br> <br> UES is purchasing solar credits and renewable energy certificates to help the company meet the state's Renewable Energy Standard (RES). Participating customers receive a one-time rebate or receive an incentive based on system output or kWh savings. UES will have access to the credits for the life of the RES program.
    e credits for the life of the RES program.  +
  • '''''Note: The Arizona Corporation Commiss
    '''''Note: The Arizona Corporation Commission (ACC) recently approved modifications to this program. The up-front incentive for residential photovoltaics (PV) has been reduced to $0.10 per watt, all commercial incentives have been suspended, the incentive for solar water heating has been reduced to $0.40 per equivalent kilowatt-hour (kWh), and incentives for all non-solar renewable energy technologies have been suspended. ''''' Tucson Electric Power (TEP) created the SunShare Program in 2001 to encourage residential and business customers to install new photovoltaic (PV) equipment. TEP transitioned away from their original incentive structure for PV and added incentives for a variety of other technologies in May 2008 under the new Renewable Energy Credit Purchase Program (RECPP). The program was substantially changed again in 2013 by eliminating all commercial incentives and all incentives for non-solar renewable energy technologies. TEP offers these incentives in exchange for the renewable energy certificates they generate. Available incentives as of February 2013 are as follows: * '''Residential PV (grid-tied):''' $0.10/W. * '''Solar Domestic Water Heating and Solar Space Heating:''' $0.40/kWh equivalent, up to a maximum incentive of $1,750 See program web site for more information.
    See program web site for more information.  +
  • '''''Note: The Arizona Corporation Commiss
    '''''Note: The Arizona Corporation Commission (ACC) recently approved modifications to some elements of this program. Performance-based incentives, which had previously been available for larger renewable energy systems have been terminated. Only upfront incentives for smaller systems are now available.''''' Through the Renewable Incentive Program, Arizona Public Service (APS) offers customers who install various renewable energy systems the opportunity to sell the renewable energy credits (RECs) associated with the energy generated to APS. APS uses the RECs to demonstrate compliance with the state's[http://www.dsireusa.org/library/includes/incentive2.cfm?Incentive_Code=AZ03R&state=AZ&CurrentPageID=1&RE=1&EE=1 Renewable Energy Standard (RES)]. The solar technologies eligible for a rebate include photovoltaic (PV), solar hot water, solar HVAC and solar daylighting systems. Up-front incentives for PV may be de-rated based on expected performance. All electricity-producing systems must be connected to the grid. See web site above for complete details.
    See web site above for complete details.  +
  • '''''Note: The California Energy Commissio
    '''''Note: The California Energy Commission adopted the 2013 Building Energy Efficiency Standards for new residential and commercial construction on May 31, 2012. The new standards are expected to take effect on January 1, 2014, and represent significant energy and water savings compared to the current standards. Among many notable provisions, the new standards will require new homes and businesses to be built "solar ready", allowing for an easier installation of photovaltaic panels at a later time. The summary below represents the building code that is currently in place and will remain in place until 2014. Click [http://www.energy.ca.gov/title24/2013standards/rulemaking/ here] for more information about the 2013 Building Energy Efficiency Standards.''''' ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] websites.'' The California Building Standards Commission ([http://www.bsc.ca.gov/default.htm BSC]) is responsible for administering California's building standards adoption, publication, and implementation. Since 1989, the BSC has published triennial editions of the code, commonly referred to as Title 24, in its entirety every three years. On July 17, 2008 the BSC unanimously approved the nation's first statewide [http://www.documents.dgs.ca.gov/bsc/2009/part11_2008_calgreen_code.pdf voluntary green building code]. In January 2010, the BSC adopted a final version of the new building code, [http://www.documents.dgs.ca.gov/bsc/CALGreen/2010_CA_Green_Bldg.pdf CALGreen], parts of which became mandatory on January 1, 2011. CALGreen exists alongside the latest edition of Title 24, which took effect on January 1, 2010. CALGreen includes provisions to ensure the reduction of water use by 20%, improve indoor air quality, divert 50% of new construction waste from landfills, and inspect energy systems (i.e. heat furnace, air conditioner, mechanical equipment) for nonresidential buildings over 10,000 square feet to make sure that they're working acording to design. Title 24 applies to all buildings that are heated and/or mechanically cooled and are defined under the Uniform Building Code as A, B, E, H, N, R, or S occupancies, except registered historical buildings. Additions and renovations are also covered by the code. Institutional building's which include hospitals and prisons are not covered. For residential low-rise buildings the current code provisions include compliance credits for high performance ducts and building envelope features. The size of credit depends on the action taken. For example simply designing ducts to Air Conditioner Contractor's Association guidelines or properly sealing duct joints provided lower levels of credit than having the HVAC system tested for duct leaks. To take credit for these measures the installer and inspector must be trained and certified. Local governmental agencies can modify the state energy code to be more stringent when documentation is provided to the California Energy Commission. [http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/pub/07-08/bill/asm/ab_1101-1150/ab_1103_bill_20071012_chaptered.pdf AB 1103], passed in October 2007, requires annual energy-use reporting for all of California's nonresidential buildings effective January 2009. [http://www.energy.ca.gov/ab1103/documents/2011-09-12_workshop/2011-09-12_Assembly_Bill_531.pdf AB 531] of 2009 superseded AB 1103, and clarified that the CEC has the authority to set a schedule of compliance. The CEC decided through a rulemaking process to implement the law in stages based on building size. Starting on July 1, 2013, buildings of more than 50,000 square feet will need comply with the law. Smaller buildings will need to comply with the law by either January 1, 2014 or July 1, 2014, depending on size. Click [http://www.energy.ca.gov/ab1103/ here] for more information about the California Energy Commission's efforts to implement AB 1103 and AB 531.
    s efforts to implement AB 1103 and AB 531.  +
  • '''''Note: The California Public Utilities
    '''''Note: The California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) approved a [http://docs.cpuc.ca.gov/EFILE/MOTION/162852.PDF proposed settlement] in September 2012, enacting the first fundamental redesign of Rule 21 since 2000. The complete revised Rule 21 Tariff, as described at a high level below, can be found beginning on page 136 of CPUC Decision 12-09-018. The individual tariffs adopted by the utilities can be found on the CPUC web site above. ''''' California's "Rule 21" generally applies to systems connecting to an investor-owned utility’s distribution grid, non-export generating facilities connecting to an investor-owned utility’s transmission grid and all net metered facilities in an investor-owned utility’s service territory. Systems connecting to an investor-owned utility’s distribution grid for the purpose of participating in a wholesale transaction must apply under the investor-owned utility’s Wholesale Distribution Access Tariff. Systems connecting to the transmission grid must apply to the California Independent System Operator for interconnection. Systems connecting to the grid of a municipal or cooperative utility must follow the interconnection procedures adopted by that utility. Rule 21 clearly defines a series of screens meant to filter applicants into the study path most suited for their project. It also establishes fixed timelines for the screens intended to speed the process of approval. Also defined in the tariff are a variety of fees and deposits required at various stages of the interconnection process. Net metered facilities are exempt from most of these fees. '''Fast Track Eligibility'''<br> Non-exporting systems (sized and designed so that the electricity is only used on-site and will never deliver electricity to the grid) and all net metered systems, regardless of nameplate capacity, can qualify for Fast Track. Exporting facilities may also be considered for Fast Track if they meet certain size restrictions or if the owner agrees to certain utility-approved protective devices. After a customer applies for interconnection, the utility performs an Initial Review. If the applicant passes through Initial Review, the system will be able to interconnect without a Supplemental Review. If Supplemental Review is required, the applicant will be notified and can elect to have their application withdrawn, or proceed through the next layer of screens. '''Detailed Study Eligibility'''<br> Systems not eligible for Fast Track may apply for interconnection through a detailed study process. The detailed study options include an Independent Study Process, a Distribution Group Study Process or a Transmission Cluster Study Process. The parameters for each process are provided in Rule 21.
    for each process are provided in Rule 21.  +
  • '''''Note: The California State Board of E
    '''''Note: The California State Board of Equalization (BOE) approved new [http://www.boe.ca.gov/proptaxes/pdf/lta12053.pdf guidelines] for the Active Solar Energy Systems New Construction Exclusion. The guidelines clarify that the exclusion applies to qualified locally assessed commercial, industrial, and utility-scale systems. ''''' Section 73 of the California Revenue and Taxation Code allows a property tax exclusion for certain types of solar energy systems installed between January 1, 1999, and December 31, 2016. This section was amended by [http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/pub/07-08/bill/asm/ab_1451-1500/ab_1451_bill_20080928_chaptered.pdf AB 1451] in September 2008 to include the construction of an active solar energy system incorporated by an owner-builder in the initial construction of a new building that the owner-builder does not intend to occupy or use. This only applies if the owner-builder did not already receive an exclusion for the same active solar energy system and only if the initial purchaser purchased the new building prior to that building becoming subject to reassessment to the owner-builder. [http://leginfo.ca.gov/pub/11-12/bill/asm/ab_0001-0050/abx1_15_bill_20110628_chaptered.pdf ABX1-15] of 2011 clarified that systems installed through sale-leaseback arrangements or partnership flip structures can benefit from this exclusion. Click [http://www.boe.ca.gov/proptaxes/pdf/lta11030.pdf here] and [http://www.boe.ca.gov/proptaxes/pdf/lta11039.pdf here] for Letters to Assessors from the State Board of Equalization that further explain the impact of ABX1-15. <br> <br> Qualifying active solar energy systems are defined as those that "are thermally isolated from living space or any other area where the energy is used, to provide for the collection, storage, or distribution of solar energy." These include solar space conditioning systems, solar water heating systems, active solar energy systems, solar process heating systems, photovoltaic (PV) systems, and solar thermal electric systems, and solar mechanical energy. Solar pool heating systems and solar hot-tub-heating systems are not eligible.<br> <br> Components included under the exclusion include storage devices, power conditioning equipment, transfer equipment, and parts. Pipes and ducts that are used to carry both solar energy and energy derived from other sources qualify for the exemption only to the extent of 75% of their full cash value. Likewise, dual-use equipment for solar-electric systems qualifies for the exclusion only to the extent of 75% of its value.<br> <br> System owners should contact the applicable county assessor's office for further information. Click [http://www.boe.ca.gov/proptaxes/assessors.htm here] for a listing of County Assessor offices in California, and [http://www.boe.ca.gov/proptaxes/pdf/lta08071.pdf here] for a December 2008 letter to the assessor that further clarifies the terms of the exclusion.
    ther clarifies the terms of the exclusion.  +
  • '''''Note: The Community Conservation Chal
    '''''Note: The Community Conservation Challenge (CCC) program''''' '''''is generally offered in the Fall. 2015 Applications will be available soon. ''''' The Indiana Office of Energy Development (OED) is offering grants under the CCC program. Non-residential entities may apply to receive $25,000-$100,000 for community energy conservation projects. Projects must be located in Indiana and must use commercially-available technologies. The project must be visible to the public and have at least one community partner, though priority will be given to projects with support from multiple organizations. A cost share is not required but applicants are encouraged to leverage other funds in lieu of cost share. Applicants may apply for either an Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy grant or an Alternative Fuel Vehicles grant. Eligible projects include projects that demonstrate measurable improvements in energy efficiency or renewable energy, projects that result in a reduction in energy demand or fuel consumption, or projects that implement an energy recycling process. Eligible technologies include alternative fuel on-road vehicles, biomass, energy efficiency including HVAC, lighting, and traffic signals, combined heat and power, geothermal, solar, solar hot water, waste management and recycling, water systems, and wind. Applications are limited to one per applicant, and necessary materials are located on the program web site.
    rials are located on the program web site.  +
  • '''''Note: The Development Grant solicitat
    '''''Note: The Development Grant solicitation is currently closed for this year.''''' Through the Commonwealth Wind Incentive Program – Community-Scale Wind Initiative the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) offers site assessment grants of services, feasibility study grants, design and construction grants, and development grants for community-scale wind projects greater than 100 kW that will serve a load at the project site (and typically net meter) or will serve load requirements of a host municipal light department. MassCEC is the administrator of the Massachusetts Renewable Energy Trust (RET), the state's clean energy fund. Projects must owned by commercial, industrial, or institutional (including not-for-profit or public) entities served by one of the investor-owned electric distribution utilities in Massachusetts -- Fitchburg Gas and Electric Light (Unitil), Massachusetts Electric (National Grid), Nantucket Electric (National Grid), NSTAR Electric, or Western Massachusetts Electric. In addition, customers of any Municipal Light Plant (MLP) Department that pays into the RET are eligible (see MassCEC's [http://www.masscec.com/ web site] for additional information on which MLP's have joined the RET). The site assessment grant is a grant of services. For public entities, there is no cost share. For non-public entities, the MassCEC requires a cost share of $1,500. The site assessment is intended to be the first step of many when planning a wind project. It is also required for additional MassCEC community-scale wind grants. There is a specific framework determined for these services, with project timelines and responsibilities clearly defined. The entire site assessment process is designed to last 12 weeks. The feasibility study grant analyzes all aspects of a project, including the technical, environmental, regulatory, and financial aspects. Public outreach and stakeholder engagement is required as part of the feasibility study. In addition, a detailed wind resource assessment is required and additional funding is available for that piece. Acoustic studies may qualify for additional funding and should follow MassCEC's Acoustic Methodology for Wind Projects. A public entity may also apply for business planning grants, which take place after the feasibility study. Finally, development grants are available for community-scale wind projects. These grants may be used for both development activities, such as permitting, environmental impact evaluation, technical studies, and public outreach, and construction activities, such as turbine procurement, construction, and commissioning. Funding levels (with associated cost shares) are as follows: * Feasibility Study, Public Entity: $50,000 maximum grant with 5% cost share. * Feasibility Study, Non-Public Entity: $40,000 maximum grant with 20% cost share. * Wind Monitoring Equipment Adder, Public Entity: $20,000, with 5% cost share. * Wind Monitoring Equipment Adder, Non-Public Entity: $15,000 with 20% cost share. * Acoustic Study Grant, Public Entity: $15,000 maximum grant and no cost share. * Acoustic Study Grant, Non-Public Entity: $12,000 maximum grant with 20% cost share. * Business Planning Adder, Public Entity only: $15,000 maximum grant with 5% cost share. * Development Grant, Public Entity: $400,000 maximum grant with 5% cost share. * Development Grant, Non-Public Entity: $260,000 maximum grant with 25% cost share. All applications must be submitted electronically. Interested applicants must review the full program documentation, solicitations and applications. This is only a brief overview.
    plications. This is only a brief overview.  +
  • '''''Note: The Development Grant solicitat
    '''''Note: The Development Grant solicitation is currently closed for this year.''''' Through the Commonwealth Wind Incentive Program – Commercial Wind Initiative the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) offers site assessment grants of services, feasibility study grants, and development grants and loans for commercial wind projects 2 MW or greater that will serve the whole-sale energy markets or for projects that do not qualify for net metering but provide on-site use. MassCEC is the administrator of the Massachusetts Renewable Energy Trust (RET), the state's clean energy fund. <br> <br> Projects must owned by commercial, industrial, or institutional (including not-for-profit or public) entities served by one of the investor-owned electric distribution utilities in Massachusetts -- Fitchburg Gas and Electric Light (Unitil), Massachusetts Electric (National Grid), Nantucket Electric (National Grid), NSTAR Electric, or Western Massachusetts Electric. In addition, customers of any Municipal Light Plant (MLP) Department that pays into the RET are eligible (see MassCEC's [http://www.masscec.com/content/municipal-lighting-plant-communities web site] for additional information on which MLP's have joined the RET). The site assessment grant is a grant of services. For public entities, there is no cost share. For non-public entities, the MassCEC requires a cost share of $1,500. The site assessment is intended to be the first step of many when planning a wind project. It is also required for additional MassCEC commercial wind grants. There is a specific framework determined for these services, with project timelines and responsibilities clearly defined. The entire site assessment process is designed to last 12 weeks. The feasibility study grant analyzes all aspects of a project, including the technical, environmental, regulatory, and financial aspects. Public outreach and stakeholder engagement is required as part of the feasibility study. In addition, a detailed wind resource assessment is required and additional funding is available for that piece. Acoustic studies may qualify for additional funding and should follow MassCEC's Acoustic Methodology for Wind Projects. A public entity may apply for business planning grants, which take place after the feasibility study. Finaly, development grants are now available for commercial wind projects. These grants may be used for activities such as permitting, evaluating environmental impacts, performing geotechnical or interconnection studies, and public outreach. Funding levels (with associated cost shares) are as follows: * Feasibility Study, Public Entity: $50,000 maximum grant with 5% cost share. * Feasibility Study, Non-Public Entity: $40,000 maximum grant with 20% cost share. * Wind Monitoring Equipment Adder, Public Entity: $20,000, with 5% cost share. * Wind Monitoring Equipment Adder, Non-Public Entity: $15,000 with 20% cost share. * Acoustic Study Grant, Public Entity: $15,000 maximum grant and no cost share. * Acoustic Study Grant, Non-Public Entity: $12,000 maximum grant with 20% cost share. * Business Planning Adder, Public Entity only: $15,000 maximum grant with 5% cost share. * Development Grant, Non-Public Entity only: $250,000 maximum grant with 40% cost share. All applications must be submitted electronically. Interested applicants must review the full program documentation, solicitations and applications. This is only a brief overview.
    plications. This is only a brief overview.  +
  • '''''Note: The Division of Energy is now a
    '''''Note: The Division of Energy is now accepting applications for the FY2015 program. Applications are due October 31, 2014.''''' The Missouri Energy Loan Program, administered by the Division of Energy in the Missouri Department of Economic Development (DED), is available for energy efficiency and renewable energy projects for public and governmental buildings and structures. Eligible recipients include public schools (K-12), public/private colleges and universities, city/county governments, public water and wastewater treatment facilities, and public/private non-profit hospitals.<br> <br> Loan amounts are based on projected energy savings from energy efficiency upgrades, which result in monetary savings that are used to repay the loan. For Fiscal Year (FY) 2015 (July 2014 – October 2014), financing is set at a 2.5% interest rate and 1% loan origination fee. Repayment schedules are determined on an individual project basis, but not to exceed 10 years. Loans under this program are determined on a competitive basis according to payback period. In FY2014, $5,000,000 in loan funding was available, and in FY2015, $7,500,000 in loan funding is available. Loans are available in amounts from $5,000 to $1,500,000 per applicant. As funds remain after review and priority ranking of applications, the department has considered awarding loans in excess of $1,500,000. '''Background ''' The Missouri Department of Economic Development’s Division of Energy has provided the energy loans from petroleum violation escrow funds and bonds since 1989. Since the program's inception, loans totaling over $89 million have been made through this program, resulting in an estimated cumulative savings of $167 million. The interest rates for energy loan financing are generally lower than the market interest rates. Loan recipients repay the loans with money saved on energy costs as a result of implementing energy efficiency and renewable energy projects. An energy saving loan is not defined as debt for public schools and local governments and therefore does not count against debt limits or require a public vote or bond issuance.
    or require a public vote or bond issuance.  +
  • '''''Note: The Federal Housing Financing A
    '''''Note: The Federal Housing Financing Agency (FHFA) issued a [http://www.fhfa.gov/webfiles/15884/PACESTMT7610.pdf statement] in July 2010 concerning the senior lien status associated with most PACE programs. In response to the FHFA statement, most local PACE programs have been suspended until further clarification is provided. ''''' Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing effectively allows property owners to borrow money to pay for energy improvements. The amount borrowed is typically repaid via a special assessment on the property over a period of years. North Carolina has authorized certain local governments to establish such programs, as described below. (As of December 2009, no community in North Carolina offers PACE financing; contact your local government to find out if it has considered establishing a PACE financing program.) In August 2009, North Carolina enacted legislation ([http://www.ncleg.net/Sessions/2009/Bills/Senate/PDF/S97v6.pdf S.B. 97]) that authorizes* counties and cities to make special assessments in order to finance the installation of "distributed generation renewable energy sources or energy efficiency improvements that are permanently fixed to residential, commercial, industrial or other real property." Counties and cities that choose to adopt such programs may finance them by revenue bonds, general obligation bonds or general revenues. For more detailed information, see the University of North Carolina School of Government's resources on the subject: * [http://www.sog.unc.edu/pubs/electronicversions/pdfs/lfb40.pdf An Overview of Special Assessment Bond Authority in North Carolina], published in November 2009. * [http://sogweb.sog.unc.edu/blogs/localgovt/?p=1319 Blog Entry: Authorized Local Government Financing Programs for Energy Efficiency Improvements and Distributed Generation Renewable Energy Sources on Private Property], published in November 2009. *'' As of September 2011, no cities or counties in North Carolina have created a PACE program.''
    th Carolina have created a PACE program.''  +
  • '''''Note: The Federal Housing Financing A
    '''''Note: The Federal Housing Financing Agency (FHFA) issued a [http://www.fhfa.gov/webfiles/15884/PACESTMT7610.pdf statement] in July 2010 concerning the senior lien status associated with most PACE programs. In response to the FHFA statement, most local PACE programs have been suspended until further clarification is provided. ''''' Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing effectively allows property owners to borrow money to pay for energy improvements. The amount borrowed is typically repaid via a special assessment on the property over a period of years. Texas has authorized local governments to establish such programs, as described below. (Not all local governments in Texas offer PACE financing; contact your local government to find out if it has established a PACE financing program.) Texas first enacted legislation in May 2009 that authorizes municipalities to establish contractual assessments for energy efficiency and renewable energy improvements to commercial, residential and industrial property. The law establishes the process for a municipality to establish a program, but many of the details of the program are determined locally. Texas passed subsequent legislation in 2013 (SB 385) that allows counties to also establish PACE programs, but only for commercial, industrial, and multifamily residential property. Under this new legislation a city or county may designate a single region or multiple regions within its boundaries as an assessment area. As required by the original law, the municipality must first pass a resolution stating its intent to designate an area for the assessment, even if the area will cover the entire municipality. That same resolution must include proposed details of the program and a public hearing must be held to receive feedback from constituents. The resulting municipal plan must determine and specify the following: * Eligible renewable-energy systems and energy-efficient technologies; * A method for ranking requests from property owners for financing through contractual assessments if requests exceed the authorization amount; * Specification of whether the property owner may purchase the equipment directly or contract for the installation; * The maximum aggregate dollar amount of contractual assessments; * A map of the boundaries within which contractual assessments will be offered; * A draft contract specifying the terms to be agreed upon by the municipality and a property owner; * A method for ensuring that property owners who request financing have the ability to fulfill financial obligations; and * A plan for raising the capital required to pay for work performed. The law allows municipalities to fund these directly or use proceeds from bonds. Furthermore, the plan must include information on how the interest rate and repayment schedule is determined, and whether or not a reserve fund will be created (and how). Once the municipal plan is implemented, property owners within the assessment area may opt-in to the program voluntarily. Subsequently, after they enter into a contractual assessment and receive funding for their energy improvements, a lien will be placed on their property and will remain until the assessment, and interest is fully repaid.
    assessment, and interest is fully repaid.  +
  • '''''Note: The Federal Housing Financing A
    '''''Note: The Federal Housing Financing Agency (FHFA) issued a [http://www.fhfa.gov/webfiles/15884/PACESTMT7610.pdf statement] in July 2010 concerning the senior lien status associated with most PACE programs. In response to the FHFA statement, most local PACE programs have been suspended until further clarification is provided. ''''' Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing effectively allows property owners to borrow money to pay for energy improvements. The amount borrowed is typically repaid via a special assessment on the property over a period of years. Wisconsin has authorized certain local governments to establish such programs, as described below. (Not all local governments in Wisconsin offer PACE financing; contact your local government to find out if it has established a PACE financing program.) Wisconsin enacted legislation [http://www.legis.state.wi.us/2009/data/acts/09Act11.pdf (A.B. 255)] in May 2009 that amended local governments' existing authority to impose "special charges" for certain services. Originally, local governments were authorized to create programs that charge its citizens for "services," such as snow/ice removal, garbage collection, recycling, weed control, among others. A.B. 255 added energy efficiency improvements -- including renewable energy devices -- to the list. Furthermore, the legislation authorizes local governments to make a loan to property owners for energy efficiency and/or renewable energy improvements. In May 2010 S.B. 624 added water efficiency measures to the list of eligible improvements. The original legislation limited such loans to residential premises, but the law was expanded by S.B. 624 to include commercial and industrial properties. The repayments are considered a "special charge" and may be collected in installments. Responsibility for the charge may be passed on to the next owner of the property if it is not completely repaid by the time of sale. Municipalities may enter into an agreements with the owner or lessee regarding loan payments to a third party for owner-arranged or lessee-arranged financing. Additionally, such a third party may collect the special charges allowed under the law. Each local government that chooses to offer a PACE financing program must determine the eligible energy efficiency or renewable energy technologies, identify a funding source, develop the terms of the loan, and program specifics. For projects of $250,000 or more, all municipalities must require that contractors or projects engineers guarantee that the improvements will result in a savings-to-investment ratio of greater than 1.0. If the project fails to meet that standard, the contractor or engineer must pay the owner any shortfall in savings below that level. For projects less than $250,000, municipalities may require a third-party review of the projected savings before approving the project. As of August 2011, local PACE programs had been launched by three local governments, as follows: * Milwaukee - Milwaukee Shines Solar Loan Program (this has since been suspended) * River Falls Municipal utilities - [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=WI82F&re=1&ee=1 Save Some Green Renewable Energy Finance Program] * Racine - Retrofit Racine Energy Efficiency Program (this has since been suspended)
    cy Program (this has since been suspended)  +
  • '''''Note: The Federal Housing Financing A
    '''''Note: The Federal Housing Financing Agency (FHFA) issued a [http://www.fhfa.gov/webfiles/15884/PACESTMT7610.pdf statement] in July 2010 concerning the senior lien status associated with most PACE programs. In response to the FHFA statement, most local PACE programs have been suspended until further clarification is provided. ''''' Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing effectively allows property owners to borrow money to pay for energy improvements. The amount borrowed is typically repaid via a special assessment on the property over a period of years. Maryland has authorized local governments to establish such programs, as described below. (Not all local governments in Maryland offer PACE financing; contact your local government to find out if it has established a PACE financing program.) In May 2009, Maryland enacted legislation permitting counties and municipal corporations to adopt resolutions or ordinances establishing clean energy loan programs based on the "PACE" model. The legislation includes provisions permitting local governments to issue bonds to fund such financing programs. If adopted by a local governing body, the program allows local property owners to opt in to a renewable energy or eligible energy-efficiency loan program and repay the loan through a surcharge on their property tax bill. The surcharge remains attached to the property upon a change in ownership and is limited to the amount needed to recover costs associated with issuing bonds, financing the loans, and administering the program. The authorizing legislation describes a series of details that must be included in the local legislation implementing such financing programs, although specific details are largely left at the discretion of the local government. Local governments may generally specify property owner eligibility, eligible improvements or technologies, and loan terms and conditions. However, the state legislation specifically prohibits commercial renewable energy projects larger than 100 kilowatts from participating in local clean energy loan programs. In addition, it dictates that local eligibility requirements for property owners address their ability to repay a loan through a process similar to mortgage loan approval. For a bond issuance, the local government may specify the principal amount, interest rate/variable rate, terms of sale, payment intervals, conditions for redemption before maturity, and other details as necessary. Bonds (serial or term) issued under this provision must mature no later than 40 years after their issue date.
    ater than 40 years after their issue date.  +
  • '''''Note: The Federal Housing Financing A
    '''''Note: The Federal Housing Financing Agency (FHFA) issued a [http://www.fhfa.gov/webfiles/15884/PACESTMT7610.pdf statement] in July 2010 concerning the senior lien status associated with most PACE programs. [http://www.dsireusa.org/documents/Incentives/OK18F.htm S.B. 102] amended the law to make PACE loans junior and inferior to other liens. Effective November 1, 2011, this law should allow local governments to adopt PACE programs that are within the acceptable parameters established by the FHFA.''''' Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing effectively allows property owners to borrow money to pay for energy improvements. The amount borrowed is typically repaid via a special assessment on the property over a period of years. Oklahoma has authorized county governments to establish such programs, as described below. (Not all local governments in Oklahoma offer PACE financing; contact your local government to find out if it has established a PACE financing program.) Oklahoma enacted legislation in April 2009 (S.B. 668) that authorized counties to create "County District Energy Authorities." The Authorities are authorized to issue notes/bonds, seek out public/private lenders, or apply for grants/loans from other governmental entities in order to establish and fund local PACE programs. Once a county has established the Authority and PACE program, county property owners, who are up-to-date on their property taxes, may enter into a contract with the county to receive a loan for permanently fixed renewable energy or energy efficiency improvements to their property. These loans are then repaid via the property taxes and they constitute a lien on the property until paid in full. The legislation mandates that any resulting county loan program established must require participating property owners to undergo an energy audit (the cost of the audit may also be rolled into the financing received). The efficiency equipment must be energy star rated. Finally, the legislation also authorizes the County District Energy Authorities to establish a grant program for not-for-profit organizations that are property-tax exempt, although the Authorities are not required to do so. The remaining details of a county program are determined locally and will vary from county to county.
    cally and will vary from county to county.  +
  • '''''Note: The Federal Housing Financing A
    '''''Note: The Federal Housing Financing Agency (FHFA) issued a [http://www.fhfa.gov/webfiles/15884/PACESTMT7610.pdf statement] in July 2010 concerning the senior lien status associated with most PACE programs. In response to the FHFA statement, most local PACE programs have been suspended until further clarification is provided. ''''' Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing effectively allows property owners to borrow money to pay for energy improvements. The amount borrowed is typically repaid via a special assessment on the property over a period of years. Georgia has authorized certain local governments to establish such programs, as described below. (Not all local governments in Georgia offer PACE financing; contact your local government to find out if it has established a PACE financing program.) Georgia has authorized the expansion of "business improvement districts" to allow county, city, or town development authorities to provide financing for the installation of renewable energy systems, energy efficiency or conservation improvements, and water efficiency or conservation improvements to residential, commercial, industrial or other qualifying property.
    , industrial or other qualifying property.  +
  • '''''Note: The Federal Housing Financing A
    '''''Note: The Federal Housing Financing Agency (FHFA) issued a [http://www.fhfa.gov/webfiles/15884/PACESTMT7610.pdf statement] in July 2010 concerning the senior lien status associated with most PACE programs. In response to the FHFA statement, most local PACE programs have been suspended until further clarification is provided. ''''' Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing effectively allows property owners to borrow money to pay for energy improvements. The amount borrowed is typically repaid via a special assessment on the property over a period of years. Oregon has authorized certain local governments to establish such programs, as described below. (Not all local governments in Oregon offer PACE financing; contact your local government to find out if it has established a PACE financing program.) Oregon has authorized the creation of "local improvement districts" where cities and counties provide financing for the installation of renewable-energy systems and energy-efficiency improvements to residential, commercial, industrial or other qualifying real property. [http://www.leg.state.or.us/09reg/measpdf/hb2600.dir/hb2626.en.pdf HB 2626], enacted in July 2009, authorizes local governments to provide loans for renewable energy and energy efficiency improvements. Local governments may issue revenue bonds to finance this loan program or can borrow money from the Oregon Department of Energy under the Energy Efficiency and Sustainable Technologies Loan Program for small-scale local energy projects. Prior to establishing the program, the local government must notify the electric and gas utilities in the area, as the loans may be paid back on utility bills. The loans may be secured with a lien on the property, although liens are not senior. Some potential options for loan repayment are via a special assessment on local government taxes, utility bills, or another approved method of loan repayment.
    another approved method of loan repayment.  +
  • '''''Note: The Federal Housing Financing A
    '''''Note: The Federal Housing Financing Agency (FHFA) issued a [http://www.fhfa.gov/webfiles/15884/PACESTMT7610.pdf statement] in July 2010 concerning the senior lien status associated with most PACE programs. In response to the FHFA statement, most local PACE programs have been suspended until further clarification is provided. ''''' Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing effectively allows property owners to borrow money to pay for energy improvements. The amount borrowed is typically repaid via a special assessment on the property over a period of years. Illinois has authorized certain local governments to establish such programs, as described below. (Not all local governments in Illinois offer PACE financing; contact your local government to find out if it has established a PACE financing program.) Illinois has authorized municipalities -- cities, villages and incorporated towns -- and counties to enter into voluntary agreements with property owners to provide for contractual assessments. These assessments will provide financing to the property owner to install renewable energy technologies or energy efficiency upgrades that are permanently fixed to the property. The property owner then repays the assessments via his/her property taxes. As of July 2013, no municipalities in Illinois offer PACE programs.
    ipalities in Illinois offer PACE programs.  +
  • '''''Note: The Federal Housing Financing A
    '''''Note: The Federal Housing Financing Agency (FHFA) issued a [http://www.fhfa.gov/webfiles/15884/PACESTMT7610.pdf statement] in July 2010 concerning the senior lien status associated with most PACE programs. In response to the FHFA statement, most local PACE programs have been suspended until further clarification is provided. ''''' Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing effectively allows property owners to borrow money to pay for energy improvements. The amount borrowed is typically repaid via a special assessment on the property over a period of years. Virginia has authorized certain local governments to establish such programs, as described below. (Not all local governments in Virginia offer PACE financing; contact your local government to find out if it has established a PACE financing program.) Virginia passed legislation in 2009 authorizing local governments to establish a loan program to provide financing for clean energy improvements to property owners via local ordinance. Governments that opt to establish a program must hold a public hearing to solicit feedback on the draft ordinance/plan. Within the final ordinance, local governments must specify which "clean energy improvements" would be covered, they must determine funding sources, establish interest rates and loan terms. Local governments are authorized to include the participation of private lenders. In addition, within the ordinance, the local government must determine the method for collecting the loan repayment, either via water or sewer bills, real property tax assessments, or other billing method. Legislation passed in 2010 (SB 110) clarifying that the locality is authorized to place a lien on the property for the amount of the loan and that a locality may bundle loans and transfer them to a private financial institution, without impacting the lien.
    l institution, without impacting the lien.  +
  • '''''Note: The Federal Housing Financing A
    '''''Note: The Federal Housing Financing Agency (FHFA) issued a statement in July 2010 concerning the senior lien status associated with most PACE programs. In response to the FHFA statement, most local PACE programs have been suspended until further clarification is provided. After temporarily suspending their program, Palm Desert reinstated it in August 2010, but with a new requirement. Property owners who wish to participate in this program now must sign an [http://www.cityofpalmdesert.org/Modules/ShowDocument.aspx?documentid=5626 additional disclosure statement], which describes the FHFA's concerns and confirms that the property owner understands the potential risks if they choose to participate in this program.''''' The City of Palm Desert worked with the California Legislature to pass [http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/pub/07-08/bill/asm/ab_0801-0850/ab_811_bill_20080721_chaptered.pdf AB 811], which gave Palm Desert the authority to enact their Energy Independence Program (EIP). The program allows property owners in Palm Desert to borrow money from the city for energy projects at their home or facility, and to repay those loans through increased property taxes. The program was started using $2.5 million from the city's general fund. All funds for phases 1, 2 and 3 of the program have been allocated. On February 8, 2010, Palm Desert launched the newest funding round with $6 million. Half of the amount will be reserved for efficiency projects, with the other half dedicated to solar projects. All EIP loans $60,000 and higher must be approved by the city manager. <br> <br> EIP loans do not require a down payment and the interest rate initially will not exceed 10%. Loans are primarily intended to fund solar installations and a wide range of efficiency projects in existing buildings, but are also available for owners of new homes and businesses that wish to add energy improvements after they take title to the property. The city's Office of Energy Management administers the program and will provide energy checks at interested owners' properties. The city staff member will identify and review with the property owner all potential energy improvements, their estimated costs and their estimated energy savings.
    costs and their estimated energy savings.  +
  • '''''Note: The Federal Housing Financing A
    '''''Note: The Federal Housing Financing Agency (FHFA) issued a [http://www.fhfa.gov/webfiles/15884/PACESTMT7610.pdf statement] in July 2010 concerning the senior lien status associated with most PACE programs. In response to the FHFA statement, most local PACE programs have been suspended until further clarification is provided. ''''' Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing effectively allows property owners to borrow money to pay for energy improvements. The amount borrowed is typically repaid via a special assessment on the property over a period of years. Hawaii has authorized certain local governments to establish such programs, as described below. (Not all local governments in Hawaii offer PACE financing; contact your local government to find out if it has established a PACE financing program.) Existing Hawaii law authorizes counties to create special improvement districts for financing a variety of projects that serve the public purpose and benefit the county. The counties can also issue bonds and collect special taxes on property within the special improvement districts. Renewable energy and energy efficiency improvements are not specifically mentioned in the enabling law, though these improvements appear to be eligible. As of September 2011, no local governments in Hawaii have created PACE financing programs.
    waii have created PACE financing programs.  +
  • '''''Note: The Federal Housing Financing A
    '''''Note: The Federal Housing Financing Agency (FHFA) issued a [http://www.fhfa.gov/webfiles/15884/PACESTMT7610.pdf statement] in July 2010 concerning the senior lien status associated with most PACE programs.''''' Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing effectively allows property owners to borrow money to pay for energy improvements. The amount borrowed is typically repaid via a special assessment on the property over a period of years. Wyoming has authorized local governments to establish such programs, as described below. Wyoming enacted legislation in July 2011 (H.B. 0179) authorizing local governments to establish a loan program to provide financing for cost-effective energy improvements to existing residential, commercial and industrial properties. Governments that opt in to the establishment of energy improvement programs must provide an explanation of proposed programs to utilities distributing energy or natural gas to the area no later than 30 days prior to implementing said program. Eligible energy improvement programs are described as energy efficiency or renewable energy improvements within a program adopted by municipality, county or multi-county joint board. Local governments are authorized to secure loans under energy improvement programs through liens in the same manner as provided for special assessments [http://legisweb.state.wy.us/statutes/statutes.aspx?file=titles/Title15/T15CH6AR4.htm (W.S. 15-6-401 et se.)] or through other securities deemed necessary. Additional securities may include the requirement of energy audits, loan terms, application and loan fees, and conditions to ensure timely repayment of loans and fees.
    ensure timely repayment of loans and fees.  +
  • '''''Note: The Georgia Environmental Facil
    '''''Note: The Georgia Environmental Facilities Authority (GEFA) began accepting rebate applications on October 19, 2009, and by October 20, 2009, had received applications exceeding the allocated amount of funding for this program. This information is for reference only, funding has been exhausted.''''' In April 2009, Georgia enacted legislation (HB 473) creating the Georgia Clean Energy Property Rebate Program. This program will use funding from the federal ''American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009'' to provide rebates for investments in renewable energy and energy efficiency. Projects using solar photovoltaics, solar thermal electric, domestic solar water heating, wind, geothermal heat pumps and certain energy-efficiency technologies are eligible for this rebate program. Systems that take advantage of this rebate are not eligible for the state's clean energy tax credit, but they may be eligible for federal clean energy tax incentives. For more information, see the [http://www.gefa.org/Index.aspx?page=489 program guidelines].
    g/Index.aspx?page=489 program guidelines].  +
  • '''''Note: The Green Communities Grant Pro
    '''''Note: The Green Communities Grant Program is no longer accepting applications. The deadline to receive official designation as a Green Community was October 30, 2012. For designated communities, the grant application period closed January 21, 2013.''''' In 2008, Massachusetts enacted the Green Communities Act ([http://www.malegislature.gov/Laws/SessionLaws/Acts/2008/Chapter169 S.B. 2768]) and created the Green Communities Division within the Department of Energy Resources (DOER) to support Massachusetts communities towards a sustainable future, specifically in terms of energy use. <br> <br> The Green Communities Division offers educational, technical, and networking support to the states' communities. In addition, they provide financial incentives. The Green Communities Grant Program offers funding for communities investing in energy efficiency upgrades and policies, renewable energy technologies, energy management systems and services, and demand side reduction programs. <br> <br> To be eligible, communities first must apply for and achieve official designation as a "Green Community." The basic steps required for this designation include: * Stipulate "as-of-right" siting for renewable energy (or alternative energy) generation, manufacturing, or research and development (via ordinance) * Provide for expedited application and permitting processes for those facilities sited in "as-of-right" designated locations * Reduce energy use by 20% in 5 years * Adopt a policy and procure only fuel-efficient vehicles * Establish requirements to minimize life-cycle energy costs for new construction (suggested route for achieving this step is via adoption of "Stretch Code." See the program website for more information). The Green Communities Division provides several model ordinances and guides and is staffed with energy experts to help communities take these steps to earn designation. As of September 2012, there are 103 officially designated [[Green Communities in Massachusetts]]. At the time of designation, the Green Communities Division will inform municipalities of its grant amount, which is based on the available funds, number of applications and a grant formula. Then, the Green Community is invited to submit a grant application for the grant amount.
    a grant application for the grant amount.  +
  • '''''Note: The Green Energy Fund regulatio
    '''''Note: The Green Energy Fund regulations are currently under revision to improve program function and meet the requirements of the Delaware Energy Act. The Delaware Division of Energy and Climate [http://www.dnrec.delaware.gov/energy/services/GreenEnergy/Pages/GEF_Regulations_Update.aspx webpage] will provide details about relevant public meetings and workshops, proposed draft regulations, and other documents during the regulatory revision process.''''' Under the 2005 Delaware renewable portfolio standard (RPS) legislation, municipal utilities were allowed to opt out of the compliance schedule if they contributed to the Green Energy Fund for investor-owned utilities or created their own green energy fund with an equal surcharge (i.e. $0.000178/kWh). In 2010 the Delaware RPS was amended by [http://delcode.delaware.gov/sessionlaws/ga145/chp451.shtml SS 1 for S.B. 119] and the section (26 Del. C. § 363) detailing the obligations of municipal utilities was slightly revised. While these amendments change several other opt-out requirements, the provision mandating green energy fund contributions in the event of an opt-out remains unchanged. The Delaware Municipal Electric Corporation (DEMEC), a joint action agency and wholesale electric company representing the state's nine municipal utilities, opted out of the RPS requirements on behalf of the municipal utilities, and the utilities created their own funds. The surcharge for the investor-owned utility fund was doubled in 2007 through legislation, but the surcharge for the municipal utilities was not affected. DEMEC municipal utility members include: Newark, New Castle, Middletown, Dover, Smyrna, Seaford, Lewes, Clayton and Milford. Each municipal utility has its own distinct fund. Customers of one utility cannot access another utility's fund revenues. As a result, some of the utilities' funds are very limited. Estimated annual income for each utility fund, based on 2008 retail sales data from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), is included below: *City of Dover: $165,939 *City of Newark: $9,318 *City of Milford: $9,688 *City of Seaford: $33,881 *City of Lewes: $30,849 *Town of Middletown: $5,336 *City of New Castle: $31,817 *Town of Smyrna: $9,775 *Town of Clayton: $10,433 At the end of 2010 the DEMEC reported that the fund held approximately $307,036 between the nine municipal utilities. The DEMEC green energy funds support the municipal [http://www.dsireusa.org/library/includes/incentive2.cfm?Incentive_Code=DE01F&state=DE&CurrentPageID=1&RE=1&EE=1 Green Energy Program Incentives], which include rebates for solar electric, solar heating, geothermal heat pumps, and wind power.
    ng, geothermal heat pumps, and wind power.  +
  • '''''Note: The Green Energy Fund regulatio
    '''''Note: The Green Energy Fund regulations are currently under revision to improve program function and meet the requirements of the Delaware Energy Act. The Delaware Division of Energy and Climate [http://www.dnrec.delaware.gov/energy/services/GreenEnergy/Pages/GEF_Regulations_Update.aspx webpage] will provide details about relevant public meetings and workshops, proposed draft regulations, and other documents during the regulatory revision process.''''' Under the 2005 Delaware renewable portfolio standard (RPS) legislation, electric cooperatives were allowed to opt out of the RPS schedule if they met certain other requirements. One such requirement was that they contribute to the existing Green Energy Fund for investor-owned utilities or create their own green energy fund supported by an equal surcharge (i.e. $0.000178/kWh). In 2010 the Delaware RPS was amended by SS 1 for S.B. 119 and the section (26 Del. C. § 363) detailing the obligations of electric cooperatives was slightly revised. While these amendments change several other opt-out requirements, the provision mandating green energy fund contributions in the event of an opt-out remains unchanged. The Delaware Electric Cooperative, the state's lone cooperative, opted out of the RPS requirements and established its own green energy fund. Based on 2008 retail electricity sales data from the DEC annual report, the fund has an annual income of approximately $206,000. The surcharge for the investor-owned utility fund was doubled in 2007 through legislation, but the surcharge for the Cooperative's fund was not affected. The Green Energy Fund supports the Cooperative's [http://www.dsireusa.org/library/includes/incentive2.cfm?Incentive_Code=DE01F&state=DE&CurrentPageID=1&RE=1&EE=1 Green Energy Program Incentives], which include rebates for distributed renewable energy systems. The eligible technologies listed in this entry are based on those described in the program regulations. Incentive programs for a given technology may or may not be active at any point in time.For more information on eligibility requirements and funding, reference the Delaware Electric Cooperative's [http://www.delaware.coop/sites/default/files/DEC%20Renewable%20Resource%20Fund%20Program%20REVISED%202013%20FINAL.pdf Renewable Resource Fund Program] guide.
    df Renewable Resource Fund Program] guide.  +
  • '''''Note: The Green Energy Fund regulatio
    '''''Note: The Green Energy Fund regulations are currently under revision to improve program function and meet the requirements of the Delaware Energy Act. The Delaware Division of Energy and Climate [http://www.dnrec.delaware.gov/energy/services/GreenEnergy/Pages/GEF_Regulations_Update.aspx webpage] will provide details about relevant public meetings and workshops, proposed draft regulations, and other documents during the regulatory revision process.''''' The Delaware public benefits program, enacted through the state’s electric utility restructuring law in March 1999, collects approximately $3.2 million annually for efficiency and renewable programs and $0.8 million annually for low-income programs. Funds for the public benefit programs are collected from Delmarva Power and Light customers (the state's only investor-owned utility). Separate public benefit funds exist for the Delaware Electric Cooperative (DEC) and the state's municipal utilities through the Delaware Municipal Electric Corporation (DEMEC). Prior to July 2007, the Delmarva fund collected $0.000178 per kWh (0.178 mills/kWh) to fund renewable energy and energy efficiency* incentive programs but collections were increased to $0.000356 per kWh (0.356 mills/kWh) by S.B. 35 of 2007. This money is collected and distributed through the Green Energy Fund, which supports the following programs: [http://www.dsireusa.org/library/includes/incentive2.cfm?Incentive_Code=DE01F&state=DE&CurrentPageID=1 Green Energy Program Incentives] - providing cash grants from the Green Energy Fund for renewable energy technology installation. Funds may also support energy efficiency education programs. [http://www.dsireusa.org/library/includes/incentive2.cfm?Incentive_Code=DE02F&state=DE&CurrentPageID=1 Technology and Demonstration Grants] - providing cash grants for projects which demonstrate the market potential of renewable energy technology.** [http://www.dsireusa.org/library/includes/incentive2.cfm?Incentive_Code=DE04F&state=DE&CurrentPageID=1 Research and Development Grants] - supporting qualifying research and graduate studies in energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies.** An average of 0.095 mills/kWh (approx. $800,000 annually) is collected to fund low-income fuel assistance and weatherization programs. These funds are administered by the Department of Health and Social Services’ (DHSS) Division of State Service Centers, which currently administers similar federally-funded programs. Contact information for DHSS can be found [http://www.dhss.delaware.gov/dhss/dssc/contact.html here]. ''*S.B. 44 of 2005 added biodiesel manufacturing facilities to the list of eligible projects and clarified that energy efficiency was eligible for support from the Fund. '' ''**S.B. 266 of 2010 authorizes the State Energy Office to suspend the Research and Development and Technology and Demonstration Grants in order to fund the Green Energy Program Incentives if demand for that program exceeds funding levels. Given that the Green Energy Program is in fact oversubscribed as of August 2010, action from the State Energy Office is likely.''
    from the State Energy Office is likely.''  +
  • '''''Note: The Green Energy Loans Program
    '''''Note: The Green Energy Loans Program does not currently have information available online, however, the program is still active and accepting applications. ''''' Illinois business owners, non-profit organizations, and local governments seeking loans for certain energy efficiency and renewable energy upgrades may apply for a rate reduction, under the Green Energy Loan program through the Illinois State Treasurer's Office, in partnership with eligible banks in the state (loan seekers are encouraged to verify if the eligible banks are actively participating in the program). Loan amounts are up to $10 million.<br> <br> To qualify, the project must be located in Illinois and meet one of the following four criteria:<br> <br> 1. Participation in a state or utility administered efficiency program (ComEd, Ameren, or Dept of Commerce and Economic Opportunity); or<br> <br> 2. Have a contract with an Energy Service Company (commonly referred to as ESCO); or<br> <br> 3. Have a LEED Certified Professional working on the project with the intent to pursue LEED Certification; or<br> <br> 4. Have a plan to install renewable energy system.<br> <br> The first step is to apply for and receive a loan from a participating, eligible bank for a comprehensive energy efficiency project and/or renewable energy system. After receiving approval, the participating lending bank applies for the rate reduction from the Illinois State Treasurer's Office, using the Green Energy Loan application. If approved, the Treasurer's Office will then deposit state fund in the bank, and the bank will pass along the rate reduction. The actual rate reduction varies depending on the bank. Interest rates are [http://www.treasurer.il.gov/finances/daily-rates.aspx updated daily] on the Treasurer's web site.
    pdated daily] on the Treasurer's web site.  +
  • '''''Note: The IRS is not currently accept
    '''''Note: The IRS is not currently accepting applications for New CREB bond volume. The deadline for New CREB applications from electric cooperatives under IRS Announcement 2010-54 expired November 1, 2010. Bond volume for other eligible sectors (government entities and public power providers) was fully allocated in October 2009. <br> <br> Readers should also note that the terms "New" and "Old" CREBs are used in the following summary to distinguish between prior CREB allocations and the New CREB authorizations made by the U.S. Congress in 2008 and 2009. The use of the term "New CREBs" has legal significance in that New CREBs authorized under 26 USC § 54A and 54C have substantially different rules than prior CREB allocations authorized under 26 USC § 54. ''''' <br> <br> Clean renewable energy bonds (CREBs) may be used by certain entities -- primarily in the public sector -- to finance renewable energy projects. The list of qualifying technologies is generally the same as that used for the federal renewable energy production tax credit (PTC). CREBs may be issued by electric cooperatives, government entities (states, cities, counties, territories, Indian tribal governments or any political subdivision thereof), and by certain lenders. The bondholder receives federal tax credits in lieu of a portion of the traditional bond interest, resulting in a lower effective interest rate for the borrower.* The issuer remains responsible for repaying the principal on the bond.<br> <br> The [[Energy Improvement and Extension Act of 2008 (Div. A, Sec. 107)]] allocated $800 million for new Clean Renewable Energy Bonds (CREBs). In February 2009, the [[American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Div. B, Sec. 1111)]] allocated an additional $1.6 billion for New CREBs, for a total New CREB allocation of $2.4 billion. The Energy Improvement and Extension Act of 2008 also extended the deadline for previously reserved allocations ("Old CREBs") until December 31, 2009, and addressed several provisions in the existing law that previously limited the usefulness of the program for some projects. A separate section of the law extended CREBs eligibility to marine energy and hydrokinetic power projects.<br> <br> Participation in the program is limited by the volume of bonds allocated by Congress for the program. Participants must first apply to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) for a CREBs allocation, and then issue the bonds within a specified time period. The New CREBs allocation totaling $2.4 billion does not have a defined expiration date under the law; however, the recent IRS solicitations for new applications require the bonds to be issued within 3 years after the applicant receives notification of an approved allocation (see History section below for information on previous allocations). Public power providers, governmental bodies, and electric cooperatives are each reserved an equal share (33.3%) of the New CREBs allocation. The tax credit rate is set daily by the U.S. Treasury Department. Under past allocations, the credit could be taken quarterly on a dollar-for-dollar basis to offset the tax liability of the bondholder. However, under the new CREBs allocation, the credit has been reduced to 70% of what it would have been otherwise. Other important changes are described in IRS Notice 2009-33.<br> <br> CREBs differ from traditional tax-exempt bonds in that the tax credits issued through CREBs are treated as taxable income for the bondholder. The tax credit may be taken each year the bondholder has a tax liability as long as the credit amount does not exceed the limits established by the federal ''Energy Policy Act of 2005''. Treasury rates for prior CREB allocations, or "Old" CREBs are available [https://www.treasurydirect.gov/GA-SL/SLGS/selectCREBDate.htm here], while rates for New CREBs and other qualified tax credit bonds are available [https://www.treasurydirect.gov/GA-SL/SLGS/selectQTCDate.htm here]. <br> <br> In April 2009, the IRS issued Notice 2009-33, which solicited applications for the New CREB allocation and provided interim guidance on certain program rules and changes from prior CREB allocations. The expiration date for New CREB applications under this solicitation was August 4, 2009. Further guidance on CREBs is available in IRS Notices 2006-7 and 2007-26 to the extent that the program rules were not modified by 2008 and 2009 legislation. In October 2009, the Department of Treasury [[announced]] the allocation of $2.2 billion in new CREBs for 805 projects across the country. A new solicitation (IRS Announcement 2010-54) was issued in September 2010 for roughly $191 million in unallocated New CREB bond volume available only to electric cooperatives. The award announcement for this allocation was made in March 2011. It remains to be seen if or when the IRS will issue new funding announcements for Old CREB allocations which were not issued by the December 31, 2009 deadline, or New CREB allocations which miss the three-year issuance period. <br> <br> '''History''' <br> The federal ''Energy Policy Act of 2005'' (EPAct 2005) established Clean Energy Renewable Bonds (CREBs) as a financing mechanism for public sector renewable energy projects. This legislation originally allocated $800 million of tax credit bonds to be issued between January 1, 2006, and December 31, 2007. Following the enactment of the federal ''Tax Relief and Health Care Act of 2006'', the IRS made an additional $400 million in CREBs financing available for 2008 through Notice 2007-26. <br> <br> In November 2006, the IRS announced that the original $800 million allocation had been reserved for a total of 610 projects. The additional $400 million (plus surrendered volume from the previous allocation) was allocated to 312 projects in February 2008. Of the $1.2 billion total of tax-credit bond volume cap allocated to fund renewable-energy projects, state and local government borrowers were limited to $750 million of the volume cap, with the rest reserved for qualified municipal or cooperative electric companies.<br> <br> For further information on CREBs, contact Zoran Stojanovic or Timothy Jones of the IRS Office of Associate Chief Counsel at (202) 622-3980. Questions on recent IRS Notice 2009-33 can be directed to Janae Lemley at (636) 255-1202.<br> ''<br> <br> *In March 2010 Congress enacted [[H.R. 2847 (Sec. 301)]] permitting New CREB issuers to make an irrevocable election to receive a direct payment -- a refundable tax credit -- from the Department of Treasury equivalent to and in lieu of the amount of the non-refundable tax credit which would otherwise be provided to the bondholder. This option only applies to New CREBs issued after the March 18, 2010 enactment of the law. In April 2010 the IRS issued [[Notice 2010-35]] providing guidance on the direct payment option.''
    g guidance on the direct payment option.''  +
  • '''''Note: The Large-Distributed Solar and
    '''''Note: The Large-Distributed Solar and Wind Grant Program application period has ended for '''''FY 2015 ''''''''.'' The Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO) is offering grants for community-scale solar and wind projects located in Illinois. Eligible businesses can apply for up to 30% of project costs for solar thermal and wind and 25% for solar PV, and government and nonprofit entities can apply for up to 40% of project costs. Business photovoltaic (PV) projects are limited to $1.25/watt, and nonprofit and government PV projects are limited to $2.50/watt. Business wind projects are limited to $1.75/watt, and nonprofit and government projects are limited to $2.60/watt. The maximum grant award for all sectors and all project types is $250,000. Applicants must be customers of a utility that imposes the [http://www.revenue.state.il.us/LegalInformation/regs/part517/ Renewable Energy Resources and Coal Technology Development Assistance Charge] and must contribute at least 25% of the total project funds through its own contributions or funds from other financial partners. Funds from public incentive programs do not qualify as matching contributions. Applications are available on the program web site and will be accepted until October 17, 2014. Generation equipment and related metering components are eligible for funding. Preference is given to projects that have an innovative design, technology, or financing, or projects that are integrated into a LEED certification. Specifically, the following types of equipment are eligible: * '''Solar Thermal Systems''': Systems must be new, over $100,000 in total costs, and approved by the Solar Rating and Certification Corporation (SRCC) or a comparable organization. Applicants must provide an estimate of annual BTU production for the system. * '''Solar Photovoltaic Systems''': Systems must be new, over $100,000 in totals costs, and Underwriters Laboratories (UL) listed or have completed 1 year of field testing. Applicants must have a photovoltaic assessment analysis using PVWatts or a comparable estimation tool and submit results. * '''Wind Systems''': Systems must be new and over $100,000 in total costs. Applicants must demonstrate that the location is suitable for wind generation with the results of a wind site assessment analysis. Preference is given to projects that have had an independent wind site assessment conducted by a certified wind site assessor. Projects must be completed within 2 years of the start date of the grant agreement. Application materials are available on the program web site.
    als are available on the program web site.  +
  • '''''Note: The Michigan Economic Developme
    '''''Note: The Michigan Economic Development Corporation is not currently accepting applications for this loan fund. Check the program web site for future solicitations. ''''' In January 2010, Michigan enacted the Public Act 242 of 2009, which established the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Revolving Loan Fund Program. The Public Entities portion of the loan program is available to cities and villages located in Michigan for energy efficiency and renewable energy systems. Applicants are evaluated based on minimum credit standards. Program funds cannot be used for any costs incurred before the date of the loan agreement.<br> <br> The following size restrictions apply for wind, solar thermal water heat, and ground source heat pumps: * Wind: 20 kW or smaller * Solar Thermal: 20 kW or smaller * Ground Source Heat Pump: 5.5 tons of capacity or smaller <br> Applications are available on the program web site and must be submitted to the Michigan Economic Development Corporation.
    Michigan Economic Development Corporation.  +
  • '''''Note: The Michigan Public Service Com
    '''''Note: The Michigan Public Service Commission (MPSC) created a temporary order ([http://www.dleg.state.mi.us/mpsc/orders/electric/2008/u-15800_12-04-2008.pdf U-15800]) in December of 2008 to address implementation issues for renewable energy and energy optimization plans arising from the passage of PA 295. In March of 2010 the MPSC was granted informal approval of its RPS governing rules by the Michigan State Office of Administrative Hearings and Rules (SOAHR) and the Legislative Service Bureau (LSB). Per [http://www.dleg.state.mi.us/mpsc/orders/electric/2010/u-15900_04-27-2010.pdf Docket U-15900], the draft administrative rules were submitted for public comment at a hearing in June of 2010, with the comment period closing in July of 2010. As of November 2011, the MPSC is in the process of finalizing the administrative rules governing the renewable energy and energy optimization standards.'''''<br> In October 2008, Michigan enacted the ''Clean, Renewable, and Efficient Energy Act'', Public Act 295, requiring the state's investor-owned utilities, alternative retail suppliers, electric cooperatives and municipal electric utilities to '''generate 10% of their retail electricity sales from renewable energy resources by 2015'''. In addition to renewables, the standard allows utilities to use energy optimization (energy efficiency) and advanced cleaner energy systems to meet a limited portion of the requirement. The state's two largest investor-owned utilities, Detroit Edison and Consumers Energy, have additional obligations beyond those of other utilities.<br> '''<u>Eligible RPS Technologies</u>'''<br> '''''Renewables'''''<br> Under the standard, eligible renewables include biomass, solar and solar thermal, wind, geothermal, municipal solid waste (MSW)*, landfill gas, existing traditional hydroelectric (i.e., water passed through a dam), tidal, wave, and water current (e.g., run of river hydroelectric) resources. Biomass is broadly defined as organic matter that is not derived from fossil fuels and which replenishes over a human time frame (see Public Act 295 for additional details). New hydroelectric facilities that require new dam construction are ''not'' considered an eligible resource, although repairs, replacements, and upgrades of existing dams may be counted towards compliance. <br> '''''Energy Optimization and Efficiency'''''<br> The definition of energy optimization is synonymous with what is generally defined as energy efficiency. In order to be counted under the standard, energy efficiency measures must reduce customer consumption of energy, electricity, or natural gas. This includes both changes in equipment and changes in customer behavior directly attributable to an energy efficiency program or energy optimization plan. It does not include utility infrastructure projects that are approved for cost recovery (e.g., transmission or generation facility upgrades). Advanced cleaner energy facilities are loosely defined as electric generating facilities using a technology that is not in commercial operation as of the date of the act's effective date, but gasification, industrial cogeneration, and coal-fired facilities that capture and sequester (CCS) 85% of carbon dioxide emissions are specifically identified as eligible technologies. '''<u>RPS Compliance</u>'''<br> '''''Annual Obligations'''''<br> The compliance period for the standard begins in 2012. Each utility has a unique annual obligation based on its existing renewable energy portfolio, the amount of energy that would be required to meet the ultimate 10% target during a compliance year, and the applicable percentage obligation for that year. The annual benchmarks are as follows: <ul><li>2012: Existing renewable energy baseline plus 20% of the gap between baseline and 10% <li>2013: Existing renewable energy baseline plus 33% of the gap between baseline and 10% <li>2014: Existing renewable energy baseline plus 50% of the gap between baseline and 10% <li>100% of total obligation in 2015 A utility is obligated to close the gap between the baseline and 10% according to an increasing percentage (e.g., 20% in 2012) of the ultimate 10% goal each year from 2012-2015.</ul><br> The existing renewable energy portfolio is determined by the amount of qualifying electricity produced or obtained by an electric provider during the one-year period preceding the effective date of the act (October 6, 2008). The existing portfolio also includes certain renewable electricity production associated with PURPA qualifying facilities (QFs)** during the same time period. For the purpose of determining the 10% target for a given year, a utility may calculate total retail sales using average retail sales during the previous three years or using weather-normalized sales from the previous year. After the law was enacted, all utilities were required to file a proposed plan for meeting the renewable energy standard. The MPSC reviews these plans every 2 years. Each utility's plan can be found [http://www.michigan.gov/mpsc/0,4639,7-159-16393_53570-240176--,00.html here]. <br> '''''Large Utilities'''''<br> In addition to the percentage-based energy requirements, a utility with more than 1 million retail customers as of January 1, 2008, (i.e., Consumers Energy) must meet a renewable energy capacity standard of 200 MW by December 31, 2013, and 500 MW by December 31, 2015. A utility with more than 2 million retail customers as of January 1, 2008, (i.e., Detroit Edison) must meet a renewable energy capacity standard of 300 MW by December 31, 2013, and 600 MW by December 31, 2015. Energy production from these new renewable energy facilities can be counted towards the percentage-based component of the standard. An additional provision of the law places certain limitations on utility ownership of renewable energy facilities used to comply with the renewable energy standard.<br> '''''Energy Credits'''''<br> Compliance with the percentage standard can be met by purchasing renewable energy credits (RECs) with or without the associated renewable energy. Up to 50% of the standard may be met with RECs produced by utility-owned facilities. The Michigan Public Service Commission (PSC) was tasked with establishing a REC certification and tracking program, which was unveiled in August 2009 ([http://www.mirecs.org/ Michigan Renewable Energy Certification System]). Generally, RECs may be obtained from in state facilities or from out of state facilities located within the retail electric service territory of a utility (or subsequent expansions) as recognized by the PSC. Alternative electric suppliers are generally not permitted to meet the standard using out of state resources. However, a variety of exceptions exist to these general eligibility criteria, relating primarily to existing power purchase agreements with out of state facilities. A REC has a lifetime of three years from the end of the month it was generated. RECs generated within 120 days of the start of a calendar year may be used to satisfy the previous year's obligation. <br> Utilities may substitute energy optimization credits (EOCs) or advanced cleaner energy credits (ACECs) for renewable energy credits with approval of the PSC, although approval is not required for ACECs generated using industrial cogeneration. No more than 10% of a utility's obligation may be met using a combination of both types of credits, and no more than 70% of the 10% limit may be met using advanced energy systems in existence on or before January 1, 2008. EOCs may be substituted at a 1:1 ratio to RECs, while most ACECs are substituted at a ratio of 10 ACECs:1 REC. Exceptions to this are industrial cogeneration and plasma arc gasification, which are credited at a 1:1 ratio. <br> '''''Bonus Credits'''''<br> The standard also contains a series of bonus credits, termed Michigan incentive renewable energy credits, for each megawatt-hour (MWh) of electricity generated by certain types of systems. These credits act ''in addition'' to the single credit that a facility receives for producing 1 MWh of electricity from a qualified resource. Thus it is possible to earn multiple credit bonuses on a single MWh of electricity generation. The bonuses are described below. <ul><li>Electricity produced using solar power receives an additional 2 credits per MWh. <li>Renewable electricity produced at peak demand times by technologies other than wind receives an additional 1/5 credit per MWh. Peak demand time was defined by the PSC in a December 2008 temporary order as weekdays between 6:00 AM and 10:00 PM, excepting certain holidays. <li>Off-peak renewable electricity generation stored using advanced electric storage technology or hydroelectric pumped storage and used during peak demand times receives an additional 1/5 credit per MWh. The credit is calculated based on the initial amount of electricity used to charge the storage device, not the amount that is discharged. <li>Renewable electricity produced using equipment manufactured within the state of Michigan receives an additional 1/10 credit per MWh. This add-on is only available for three years after the in-service date of the facility. <li>Renewable electricity produced using a system which was constructed using an in-state workforce receives an additional 1/10 credit per MWh. This add-on is only available for three years after the in-service date of the facility.</ul> Utilities and alternative suppliers are required to submit plans for complying with the standard to the PSC (details vary by utility type). They are permitted to recover their compliance costs through an itemized charge beginning 90 days after the PSC approves their renewable energy plan. Rate impact cost ceilings have been set at $3.00 per month for residential customers, $16.58 per month for secondary commercial customers and $187.50 per month for primary commercial and industrial customers. The program website has information on the plans filed by Michigan utilities. <br> '''''Reporting'''''<br> Public Act 295 also included annual reporting requirements for the PSC, including information on the status of renewable and clean energy in the state, the effects of the standard on electricity prices, the cost effectiveness of the standard, and the effect on employment in the standard. The reports are due annually by February 15. The 2013 report is available [http://www.michigan.gov/mpsc/0,4639,7-159-16393_53570-240176--,00.html here].<br> '''<u>Energy Efficiency Resource Standard</u>'''<br> The law contains an energy optimization standard that applies to both natural gas and electric utilities. The electricity optimization standard requires incremental savings during 2008 and 2009 equivalent to 0.3% of 2007 retail sales, accelerating to 1.0% of previous year's retail sales in 2012 and thereafter, subject to certain exceptions. The gas optimization standard requires incremental savings during 2008 and 2009 of 0.1% of 2007 retail sales, accelerating to 0.75% of previous year's sales in 2012 and thereafter, subject to certain exceptions. As with the renewable energy standard, limited use of RECs and ACECs is permitted for compliance with the energy optimization standard. More information regarding this standard can be found [http://dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=MI17R&re=1&ee=1 here]. <br> ''*In reviewing Detroit Edison's renewable energy plan, the PSC determined that scrap tires do not qualify as municipal solid waste, but that the utility could request ACECs for energy produced using scrap tires.''<br> ''**The renewable energy standard addresses ownership rights of renewable energy credits (RECs) produced by PURPA QFs. In synopsis, the law upholds PURPA contracts that address REC ownership as they are written, while it specifies REC ownership in situations where REC ownership is addressed as part of a separate contract or is not addressed at all. The existing component of a utility's renewable portfolio includes RECs it would have had title to under the new law had it existed during the time period for which the existing renewable baseline is calculated.'' ''*In reviewing Detroit Edison's renewable energy plan, the PSC determined that scrap tires do not qualify as municipal solid waste, but that the utility could request ACECs for energy produced using scrap tires.a separate contract or is not addressed at all. The existing component of a utility's renewable portfolio includes RECs it would have had title to under the new law had it existed during the time period for which the existing renewable baseline is calculated.''
    isting renewable baseline is calculated.''  +
  • '''''Note: The New Mexico Public Regulatio
    '''''Note: The New Mexico Public Regulation Commission (PRC) [http://www.nmprc.state.nm.us/administrative-services/docs/press-releases/2012-12-18-RCT2012.pdf passed an order] in December 2012, making some significant changes to the state's Renewables Portfolio Standard. Notably, the order increased the carve-out for wind from 20% to 30% of the overall standard. It also increased the reasonable cost threshold for investor-owned utilities such that 3% of their total annual revenue must be spent procuring renewable energy. Cooperative utilities will also have to comply with a 5% reasonable cost threshold beginning in 2015.''''' In March 2007, New Mexico passed SB 418, which directs investor-owned utilities to generate 20% of total retail sales to New Mexico customers from renewable energy resources by 2020, with interim standards of 10% by 2011 and 15% by 2015. The bill also establishes a standard for rural electric cooperatives of 10% by 2020 (see below). Furthermore, utilities are to set a goal of at least 5% reduction in total retail sales to New Mexico customers, adjusted for load growth, by January 1, 2020. Renewable energy is defined as electric energy generated by low- or zero-emissions generation technology with substantial long-term production potential; solar; wind; geothermal; hydropower facilities brought in service after July 1, 2007; fuel cells that are not fossil fueled; and biomass resources, such as agriculture or animal waste, small diameter timber, salt cedar and other phreatophyte or woody vegetation removed from river basins or watersheds in New Mexico, landfill gas and anaerobically digested waste biomass. Renewable energy does not include electric energy generated from fossil fuel or nuclear facilities. Utilities document compliance with the RPS through the use of renewable-energy certificates (RECs). A REC represents one kilowatt-hour (kWh) of renewable electricity. RECs used for RPS compliance on or after January 1, 2008 must be registered with the Western Renewable Energy Generation Information System (WREGIS). RECs not used for compliance, sold, or otherwise transferred may be carried forward for up to four years. '''RPS for Investor-Owned Utilities''' In August 2007, the PRC issued an order and rules requiring that investor owned utilities meet the 20% by 2020 target through a "fully diversified renewable energy portfolio" which is defined as a minimum of 20% solar power, 30% wind power, and 5% from either biomass, geothermal energy, hydro brought into service after July 1, 2007, and other renewables starting in 2011. Additionally 1.5% must come from distributed renewables by 2011, rising to 3% in 2015. Distributed resources counted toward the other portfolio requirements cannot also be counted for the distributed requirement. Utilities will be excused from the diversification targets should costs of achieving them raise the cost of electricity by more than 2 percent or if the targets cannot be accomplished without impairing system reliability. The reasonable cost threshold for 2006 was 1% of the utilities' total annual revenue, and increased by one-fifth percent per year until January 1, 2011. The reasonable cost threshold for 2013 and 2014 is 3%. In any given year, if the cost to procure renewable energy is greater than the reasonable cost threshold, a public utility will not be required to incur that cost or to procure that resource, provided that the condition excusing performance under the renewable portfolio standard in any given year will not operate to delay the annual increases in the renewable portfolio standard in subsequent years. A public utility that believes its procurement will exceed the reasonable cost threshold shall file with the commission a request for waiver of the renewable portfolio standard for the applicable calendar year. The additional cost of the RPS to non-governmental customers who consume more than 10 million kWh per year is also limited so as not to exceed the lower of 1% of that customer's annual electric charges or $49,000. This procurement limit increases by 0.2% or $10,000 per year until January 1, 2011, when it remains fixed at the lower of 2% of the customer's annual electric charges or $99,000. After January 1, 2012, the $99,000 limit is adjusted for inflation by the amount of the cumulative change in the Consumer Price Index, Urban (CPI-U) between January 1, 2011 and January 1 of the procurement plan year. SB 549 of 2011 exempts political subdivisions of the state, under certain conditions, from all utility charges associated with renewable energy generation. On July 1 of every year, investor-owned utilities must file a report to the PRC on its procurement and generation of renewable energy during the prior calendar year and submit a procurement plan. '''RPS for Rural Electric Cooperatives''' In March 2007, SB 418 created a separate renewables portfolio standard for rural electric distribution cooperatives: 5% of retail sales by 2015, increasing 1% per year to reach 10% renewables by 2020. Cooperatives are not required to incur RPS compliance costs that exceed the “reasonable cost threshold”, which is set at 1% of the distribution cooperative’s gross receipts from business transacted in New Mexico for the preceding calendar year. This reasonable cost threshold increases to 5% beginning in 2015. In addition to the RPS, SB 418 established a “renewable energy and conservation fee” to support programs or projects to promote the use of renewable energy, load management or energy efficiency. Distribution cooperatives may collect from its customers a fee of no more than 1% of the customer’s bill, not to exceed $75,000 annually from any single customer. Distribution cooperatives must report to the PRC by March 1 of each year on its purchases and generation of renewable energy during the preceding calendar year. ''' Background''' In December 2002, the PRC unanimously approved a renewables portfolio standard (RPS) requiring investor-owned utilities to derive 5% of annual retail sales to New Mexico customers from renewable energy sources by 2006, rising to 10% by 2011. In March of 2004, Senate Bill 43 codified the PRC rules and established additional requirements. New Mexico subsequently doubled its RPS for investor-owned utilities and created a separate standard for rural electric cooperatives in March 2007 (Senate Bill 418).
    peratives in March 2007 (Senate Bill 418).  +
  • '''''Note: The Non-Residential Solar Rebat
    '''''Note: The Non-Residential Solar Rebate Program is fully subscribed. Applications received will be placed on a waitlist and will only be eligible for a rebate if a pending project is cancelled.''''' Turlock Irrigation District (TID) offers an incentive program to their customers who install solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. In keeping with the terms of the [http://www.dsireusa.org/library/includes/incentive2.cfm?Incentive_Code=CA134F&state=CA&CurrentPageID=1&RE=1&EE=0 California Solar Initiative], the incentive payment levels will decline over the life of the program in 10 steps as certain MW levels of PV systems are installed within the District. As of July 2014, the residential incentive is on the 8th step at $0.73 per watt AC of installed capacity, and the commercial program is fully subscribed. Residential systems 30 kW or larger will receive a performance-based incentive (PBI) for the actual electricity produced by the system. PBI payments are made monthly for a period of 5 years.<br> <br> All existing customers will be required to have an energy efficiency audit conducted for their home or business as part of the PV reservation. This audit will be provided by TID.<br> <br> Consult the program website above for the current rebate level.
    ebsite above for the current rebate level.  +
  • '''''Note: The Ohio Advanced Energy Fund (
    '''''Note: The Ohio Advanced Energy Fund (AEF) expired as of December 31, 2010. With its expiration, the AEF, which is a public benefit fund, is no longer collecting money and thus unable to financially support ODOD programs. For any questions on the Advanced Energy Fund, please contact the Ohio Energy Resources Division directly using the contact information below. This information is for historical purposes only.''''' The Ohio Energy Resources Division, which resides within the Ohio Department of Development (ODOD), is offering grants on a first-come, first-served basis for the installation of solar thermal technologies for new construction and retrofits of multi-family housing and single-family developments of ten (10) units or more. In order to qualify, the project must be based in Ohio and served by one of the following investor-owned utilities: American Electric Power, Dayton Power and Light, Duke Energy, and FirstEnergy. Customers of these utilities pay into the Advanced Energy Fund, which provides funds for the incentive. Incentive amounts vary depending on the development type, as summarized in the table below. Project equipment may not be ordered, purchased, or installed prior to the execution of a AEF grant agreement with the ODOD. <br> <div style="page-break-inside: avoid;"> <table border="1"> <tr> <th>Housing Type</th> <th>Incentive Level</th> <th>Maximum Grant Award: multi-family</th> <th>Maximum Grant Award: one-, two-, and three-family</th></tr> <tr> <td>Market Rate Housing</td> <td>The lesser of $30 per kBtu/day or 50% of system cost</td> <td>$75,000/building</td> <td>$8,000/unit</td></tr> <tr> <td>Affordable Housing</td> <td>The lesser of $50 per kBtu/day or 50% of system cost </td> <td>$100,000/building</td> <td>$10,000/unit</td></tr> <tr> <td>Affordable LEED/E-Star</td> <td>50% of system cost</td> <td>50% of system cost</td> <td>50% of system cost</td></tr></table></div> '''Solar Thermal Energy Incentive for Residential Housing Units (NOFA 09-03)''' The Notice of Funding Available (NOFA) provides specific definitions and guidelines regarding what qualifies as affordable multifamily, affordable one-, two-, and three-family, as well as market rate multifamily and market rate one-, two-, and three-family housing units and should be consulted. '''AEF Grant Application Guidelines and Documents''' For additional information, application guidelines and related program documents: # Visit the Ohio Energy Resource Division's [http://development.ohio.gov/Energy/Incentives/AdvancedEnergyFundGrants.htm Advanced Energy Fund Grants website] # Select the appropriate Notice of Funding Available (NOFA) based on energy project category # Review the project relevant NOFA documents to understand complete guidelines, application procedures and minimum requirements for grant eligibility
    minimum requirements for grant eligibility  +
  • '''''Note: The Ohio Advanced Energy Fund (
    '''''Note: The Ohio Advanced Energy Fund (AEF) expired as of December 31, 2010. With its expiration, the AEF, which is a public benefit fund, is no longer collecting money and thus unable to financially support ODOD programs. For any questions on the Advanced Energy Fund, please contact the Ohio Energy Resources Division directly using the contact information below. This information is for historical purposes only.''''' The Ohio Energy Resources Division, which resides within the Ohio Department of Development (ODOD), is offering grants on a first-come, first-served basis for the installation of new residential wind energy systems in the service areas of the following utilities: American Electric Power, Dayton Power and Light, Duke Energy, and FirstEnergy. Customers of these utilities pay into the Ohio Advanced Energy Fund, which provides funds for the incentive. '''''* The approved residential wind energy installer applies for and receives the grant, which is then passed directly to the end-use customer.''''' '''Residential Wind Energy Incentive (NOFA 09-02)''' The incentive is calculated as the lesser of $2/AC kilowatt-hour (kWh) of estimated annual system output or 50% of eligible system costs, up to a maximum incentive of $25,000. The system must be based in Ohio and intended for use on the primary home of the eligible customer. In order to be eligible for a grant, systems must have an estimated annual output of 3,000 kWh based on the average site wind speed at the proposed turbine hub height. Project equipment may not be ordered, purchased, or installed prior to the execution of a grant agreement with the ODOD. Incentives are only available for installations performed by an installer approved by the OERD. The AEF Grants website contains information on the criteria and application process for becoming an approved installer and a list of approved installers. '''AEF Grant Application Guidelines and Documents''' For additional information, application guidelines and related program documents: # Visit the Ohio Energy Resource Division's [http://development.ohio.gov/Energy/Incentives/AdvancedEnergyFundGrants.htm Advanced Energy Fund Grants website] # Select the appropriate Notice of Funding Available (NOFA) based on energy project category # Review the project relevant NOFA documents to understand complete guidelines, application procedures and minimum requirements for grant eligibility
    minimum requirements for grant eligibility  +
  • '''''Note: The Ohio Advanced Energy Fund (
    '''''Note: The Ohio Advanced Energy Fund (AEF) expired as of December 31, 2010. With its expiration, the AEF, which is a public benefit fund, is no longer collecting money and thus unable to financially support ODOD programs. For any questions on the Advanced Energy Fund, please contact the Ohio Energy Resources Division directly using the contact information below. This information is for historical purposes only.''''' The Ohio Energy Resources Division, which resides within the Ohio Department of Development (ODOD), is offering grants on a first-come, first-served basis for the installation of non-residential renewable-energy projects. in the service areas of the following utilities: American Electric Power, Dayton Power and Light, Duke Energy, and FirstEnergy. The ODOD issues periodic Notices of Funding Available (NOFAs) targeting different types of projects. Project equipment may not be ordered, purchased, or installed prior to the execution of a grant agreement with the ODOD. '''Non-Residential Renewable Energy (NOFA 08-09)''' Under this program solicitation, grants are available for wind energy systems, photovoltaic (PV) systems and solar thermal systems. All project components must be new and must include a manufacturer's warranty. Wind and PV systems must be grid connected; stand-alone systems are not eligible. Projects using third-party ownership structures containing an Energy Purchaser, Third-Party Owner, and a Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) are eligible to receive incentives, but are subject to slightly different program rules. The terms ''traditional'' and ''third-party'' will be used hereafter to distinguish between these types of systems. Please see the funding notice on the program website for a more detailed definition of the third-party ownership structure. ''Wind Energy Systems'' Non-residential wind-energy systems - both third-party and traditional - are eligible for a grant of $2.00/kWh (of estimated annual output). The wind system must generate a minimum of 3,000 kWh Alternative Current (AC) per year at the average wind speed for the site. The maximum incentive is 40% of the eligible system costs or $200,000, whichever is less. ''Solar Thermal Systems'' Non-residential solar-thermal systems are eligible for a grant of $30 per kilo-Btu per day. The minimum system size is 200 kilo-Btu per day for traditional systems and 500 kilo-Btu per day for third-party systems. Solar thermal collectors must be SRCC certified; the SRCC OG-100 rating is used to calculate the system output. The maximum grant award is the lesser of 50% of the project cost, or $150,000 for a traditional solar-thermal system and $200,000 for a third-party owned system. ''Solar Photovoltaic (PV) Systems'' All non-residential PV systems are eligible for a grant of $3.50 per watt (DC). The minimum system size is 10 kW (DC) for traditional systems and 50 kW (DC) for third-party systems. The maximum grant award for PV systems is 50% of project costs or $150,000 for traditional systems, whichever is less; and 50% of project costs or $200,000 for third-party systems, whichever is less. '''AEF Grant Application Guidelines and Documents''' For additional information, application guidelines and related program documents: # Visit the Ohio Energy Resource Division's [http://development.ohio.gov/Energy/Incentives/AdvancedEnergyFundGrants.htm Advanced Energy Fund Grants website] # Select the appropriate Notice of Funding Available (NOFA) based on energy project category # Review the project relevant NOFA documents to understand complete guidelines, application procedures and minimum requirements for grant eligibility
    minimum requirements for grant eligibility  +
  • '''''Note: The Ohio Advanced Energy Fund (
    '''''Note: The Ohio Advanced Energy Fund (AEF) expired as of December 31, 2010. With its expiration, the AEF, which is a public benefit fund, is no longer collecting money and thus unable to financially support ODOD programs. For any questions on the Advanced Energy Fund, please contact the Ohio Energy Resources Division directly using the contact information below. This information is for historical purposes only.''''' The Ohio Department of Development's (ODOD) Energy Resources Division is offering grants on a first-come, first-served basis for the installation of new distributed energy resources (DER) projects. Projects must be installed in Ohio and in the service territory of one of the state's four investor-owned utilities: American Electric Power, Dayton Power and Light, Duke Energy, and FirstEnergy. Project equipment may not be ordered, purchased, or installed prior to the execution of a AEF grant agreement with the ODOD. '''Distributed Energy Resources (NOFA 07-01)''' Distributed energy resources (DER) projects, defined in the current solicitation as modular technologies that generate and deliver electricity to customers at or near the point of use, include systems that use natural gas and propane, landfill gas, or biomass methane. Eligible applications include industrial heat recovery and combined heat and power (CHP), microturbines, and clean-burning reciprocating engines. Systems up to 25 MW will be eligible. The maximum grant award is $100,000 or 25% of the project's cost, whichever is less. In addition, a minimum equity investment of 10% of the project cost is also required. '''AEF Grant Application Guidelines and Documents''' For additional information, application guidelines and related program documents: # Visit the Ohio Energy Resource Division's [http://development.ohio.gov/Energy/Incentives/AdvancedEnergyFundGrants.htm Advanced Energy Fund Grants website] # Select the appropriate Notice of Funding Available (NOFA) based on energy project category # Review the project relevant NOFA documents to understand complete guidelines, application procedures and minimum requirements for grant eligibility
    minimum requirements for grant eligibility  +
  • '''''Note: The Ohio Advanced Energy Fund (
    '''''Note: The Ohio Advanced Energy Fund (AEF) expired as of December 31, 2010. With its expiration, the AEF, which is a public benefit fund, is no longer collecting money and thus unable to financially support ODOD programs. For any questions on the Advanced Energy Fund, please contact the Ohio Energy Resources Division directly using the contact information below. This information is for historical purposes only.''''' The Ohio Energy Resources Division, which resides within the Ohio Department of Development (ODOD), is offering grants on a first-come, first-served basis for the installation of new residential solar PV systems* in the service areas of the following utilities: American Electric Power, Dayton Power and Light, Duke Energy, and FirstEnergy. Customers of these utilities pay into the Ohio Advanced Energy Fund, which provides funds for the incentive. '''''* The approved residential solar PV system installer applies for and receives the grant, which is then passed directly to the end-use customer.''''' '''Residential Solar Photovoltaic Energy Incentive (NOFA 09-04)''' The incentive offered is $3.00/Watt DC of installed capacity, with a maximum incentive of $25,000. The system must be based in Ohio and intended for use on the primary home of the eligible customer. In addition, the system must use new equipment, be grid-tied, use a meter to measure kilowatt-hour (kWh) output and have an output of at least two kilowatts (kW). The grant application must include a Solar Site Analysis Report; systems must be evaluated using a Solar Pathfinder or a substitute approved by the OEO. Grant awards will be reduced by the percent the actual site varies from the ideal site found by the Solar Site Analysis Report. If selected to receive a grant, project work cannot proceed until a grant agreement has been executed. The project must be completed within 12 months of signing a grant agreement. The funds will be disbursed once the project is completed and has passed a final inspection review. Project equipment may not be ordered, purchased, or installed prior to the execution of a grant agreement with the ODOD. Incentives are only available for installations performed by an installer approved by the OERD. The AEF Grants website contains information on the criteria and application process for becoming an approved installer and a list of approved installers. '''AEF Grant Application Guidelines and Documents''' For additional information, application guidelines and related program documents: # Visit the Ohio Energy Resource Division's [http://development.ohio.gov/Energy/Incentives/AdvancedEnergyFundGrants.htm Advanced Energy Fund Grants website] # Select the appropriate Notice of Funding Available (NOFA) based on energy project category # Review the project relevant NOFA documents to understand complete guidelines, application procedures and minimum requirements for grant eligibility
    minimum requirements for grant eligibility  +
  • '''''Note: The Ohio Advanced Energy Fund (
    '''''Note: The Ohio Advanced Energy Fund (AEF) expired as of December 31, 2010. With its expiration, the AEF, which is a public benefit fund, is no longer collecting money and thus unable to financially support ODOD programs. For any questions on the Advanced Energy Fund, please contact the Ohio Energy Resources Division directly using the contact information below. This information is for historical purposes only.''''' The Ohio Energy Resources Division, which resides within the Ohio Department of Development (ODOD), is offering phase III grants for the multi-phase energy efficiency program for manufacturers. Eligibility is contingent upon successful completion of phases I and II. Additionally, projects must be installed in Ohio and in the service territory of one of the state's four investor-owned utilities: American Electric Power, Dayton Power and Light, Duke Energy (formerly CINergy) or FirstEnergy. '''Energy Efficiency Program for Manufacturers (NOFA 10-03)''' These grants will provide funding for 50% of a project's cost, with a maximum grant award of $250,000 per entity. Applicants are encouraged to finance the balance of the project cost utilizing an Advanced Energy Fund (AEF)-linked deposit. The maximum Advanced Energy Fund (AEF)-linked deposit is $500,000. All project components must be new, and energy efficiency must be demonstrated. A minimum of 15% energy-use reduction from existing conditions is required. New construction projects must show (by theoretical model) a 15% reduction in energy use from the standard code requirement. In general, projects that involve lighting technologies, HVAC technologies, refrigeration, motors (including combined heat and power), and building envelopes are eligible for funding. '''AEF Grant Application Guidelines and Documents''' For additional information, application guidelines and related program documents: # Visit the Ohio Energy Resource Division's [http://development.ohio.gov/Energy/Incentives/AdvancedEnergyFundGrants.htm Advanced Energy Fund Grants website] # Select the appropriate Notice of Funding Available (NOFA) based on energy project category # Review the project relevant NOFA documents to understand complete guidelines, application procedures and minimum requirements for grant eligibility
    minimum requirements for grant eligibility  +
  • '''''Note: The Oregon Department of Energy
    '''''Note: The Oregon Department of Energy is currently accepting applications for Renewable Energy Development (RED) Grant projects. Applications are due by January 23, 2015, and there is approximately $1.5 million available for funding. See the program's website for the opportunity announcement and application.''''' The Oregon Department of Energy (ODOE) offers competitive grants to renewable energy projects as part of ODOE's Energy Incentives Program. ODOE created this competitive grant program in 2011, and it took effect on January 1, 2012. This program replaces the formerly-available Business Energy Tax Credit. Grants are funded by the proceeds of a tax credit auction, in collaboration with the Oregon Department of Revenue. The budget is set at $3 million per biennium, but grant awards cannot exceed the proceeds of the tax credit auction. The 2014 program year is funded at $1.5 million. A variety of renewable energy technologies are eligible to receive a grant, including solar, wind, hydroelectric, biomass, biogas, landfill gas, geothermal, wind, wave, tidal, and ocean thermal. Grants are available for residential and commercial installations. Grant opportunity announcements are periodically released. Interested applicants must fill out an application and mail it in to ODOE. There is a $200 application fee. Grant applications are awarded points and the applications with the highest number of points will be awarded grants. For more information on the point system, see Oregon Administrative Rules 330-200-0000 to 330-200-0150.
    rative Rules 330-200-0000 to 330-200-0150.  +
  • '''''Note: The PV rebate is currently clos
    '''''Note: The PV rebate is currently closed. ''''' The Guadalupe Valley Electric Cooperative (GVEC) offers rebates to its member customers for the installation of photovoltaic (PV) systems, solar water heaters, solar water wells, and wind electric systems within its service territory. In order to be eligible under the current program, systems must be installed after January 1, 2014. Rebate amounts and limitations vary by technology. In order to qualify for a rebate, systems must be new and meet a variety of equipment, warranty, and installation requirements that vary by technology. All units must be installed by a program approved contractor according to the manufacturer's specified procedures and codes. Grid-connected renewable electricity systems must meet the standards of the National Electric Code (NEC) as well as the GVEC's own interconnection rules, code, and by-laws. Interconnection will take place at the GVEC's dual-register meter and electricity produced by the system will be purchased by the GVEC at the utility's renewable energy rate (i.e., not a net metering arrangement). The utility reserves to the right to inspect rebated systems in order to verify that they comply with program guidelines.
    that they comply with program guidelines.  +
  • '''''Note: The Program this year is not do
    '''''Note: The Program this year is not doing the reservation application process .''''' Focus on Energy offers rebates for residential renewable energy systems including geothermal heat pumps, solar electric (PV), and solar hot water heaters. Rebates are available on a first-come, first-served basis while funds are available. Once receiving a confirmation, the equipment must be installed within 10 weeks. A final Reward Application must be submitted after the installation. For the 2014 program, all equipment must be purchased and installed between January 1, 2014 and December 31, 2014, and Reward Applications must also be received by Focus on Energy by January 31, 2015, or 30 days after the date of installation, whichever comes first. All systems must have at least a 5-year warranty. The solar electric (PV) rebate is $600/kW DC rated capacity. All systems must be at least 0.5 kW in size and listed on the Qualified Module or Inverter list. The rated capacity must be determined by the PV USA Test Conditions value on the associated list. The system must be installed within 45 degrees of due south and with a panel tilt between 10-50 degrees. Obstacle shading must be less than 10% as measured by an industry accepted tool. The maximum reward is $2,400. The solar water heater rebate is $0.35/kWh saved or $6/Therm saved. All systems must be compliant with the Solar Rating Certificate Council (SRCC) OG-300 installation schematics and equipment inventory requirements. Collectors must be installed within 90 degrees of due south and have an obstacle shading of less than 20% as measured by an industry acceptable tool. The system must be used only to heat domestic hot water. The maximum reward is $1,200. Geothermal rebates are set at $600/unit. All systems must have an Energy Efficiency Ratio of 15 or more, a Coefficient of Performance of 3.5 or more, and must be AHRI-rated or a similar independent rating. Installations must follow ACCA Standard 5 Quality Installation standards. The system must be the primary heating and cooling source for the home. Additional program information and application materials are available on the program web site.
    als are available on the program web site.  +
  • '''''Note: The Regional Planning Commissio
    '''''Note: The Regional Planning Commission is considering amendments to the requirements outlined here. See the website above for the most recent information related to this process. ''''' In November 2008, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors adopted a [http://planning.lacounty.gov/assets/upl/project/green_20080507-green-building-program-ordinances.pdf series of ordinances] which created the Green Building Program. The ordinances included the Green Building Ordinance (2008-0065), the Drought Tolerant Ordinance (2008-0064), and the Low Impact Development Ordinance (2008-0063). These standards are updated periodically, and apply to new buildings constructed in Los Angeles County. If a reconstruction of a building exceeds 50% of its market value, it is subject to green building requirements. Registered historic sites and agricultural accessory buildings are exempt from the requirements. Requirements vary depending on the size and use of the building, as well as the date on which the building permit was filed. See above or the program web site for details.
    above or the program web site for details.  +
  • '''''Note: The Tax Credit for Renewable En
    '''''Note: The Tax Credit for Renewable Energy Resource Equipment Manufacturing Facilities has expired for new facilities. To be eligible for the credit, a manufacturing facility must have received preliminary certification prior to January 1, 2014. ''''' The Tax Credit for Renewable Energy Resource Equipment Manufacturing Facilities was enacted as a part of Oregon's Business Energy Tax Credit (BETC) in July 2007, with the passage of [http://www.leg.state.or.us/07reg/measpdf/hb3200.dir/hb3201.en.pdf HB 3201]. The tax credit equals 50% of the construction costs of a facility which will manufacture renewable energy systems, and includes the costs of the building, excavation, machinery and equipment which is used primarily to manufacture renewable energy systems. The credit may also be applied to the costs of improving an existing facility which will be used to manufacture renewable energy systems. The 50% credit is taken over the course of five years, at 10% each year. The original maximum credit of $10 million was expanded to $20 million (50% of a $40 million facility) upon the enactment of [http://www.leg.state.or.us/08ss1/measpdf/hb3600.dir/hb3619.en.pdf HB 3619] in March 2008. This legislation clarified the manufacturing credit and separated the revenue stream from the rest of BETC.<br> <br> The credit applies to companies that manufacture systems that harness energy from wood waste or other wastes from farm and forest lands, non-petroleum plant or animal based biomass, the sun, wind, water, or geothermal resources. Prior to construction, a business must participate in a pre-screening process with the Oregon Business Development Department. In addition to this preliminary review, the manufacturing facility must apply for final certification. Another review required for manufacturing facilities is a financial feasibility review. The Oregon Business Development Department may establish other rules to govern the type of equipment, machinery or other manufactured products eligible for this credit, as well as minimum performance and efficiency standards for those manufactured products. The passage of [http://www.leg.state.or.us/10ss1/measpdf/hb3600.dir/hb3680.en.pdf HB 3680] in March 2010 set a sunset date for the tax credit. Renewable energy equipment manufacturing facilities must receive preliminary certification before January 1, 2014 in order to use the tax credit.
    ry 1, 2014 in order to use the tax credit.  +
  • '''''Note: The Tennessee Solar Institute (
    '''''Note: The Tennessee Solar Institute (TSI) has now awarded all grant money alotted to the Solar Innovation Grant Program through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. TSI is not currently accepting applications for new grants. This entry is for historical purposes only; the program will reopen if more funding becomes available.''''' The Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development started the Tennessee Solar Institute in 2009 with a $29 million grant to the University of Tennessee. The Tennessee Solar Institute (TSI) reopened commercial Solar Innovation Grants with $7.25 million of Volunteer State Solar Initiative Solar Opportunity funds for a second application round. The Solar Innovation Grants are available for a variety of purposes within the solar industry, including training programs, lowering the cost of production through process improvements, increasing use of renewable energy and energy efficiency in operations. Applicants can submit up to six grants under the Solar Innovation Grants' requests for proposals. TSI will provide 20% of the requested funds at the time the grant is awarded. The rest will be administered along with project deliverables and reporting documents. After the project is completed and all reports are turned in, TSI will conduct an audit and release the final funds. Projects must comply with Buy American, NEPA, Davis-Bacon Act, and the Tennessee Prevailing Wage Law, and applications must be submitted by 6pm on January 20, 2011. The Tennessee Solar Institute also offers workforce development and technical assistance services, including free NABCEP training courses.
    s, including free NABCEP training courses.  +
  • '''''Note: The U.S. Department of Agricult
    '''''Note: The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Rural Development issues periodic Notices of Solicitation of Applications for the Rural Energy for America Program (REAP) in the Federal Registry. The most recent solicitation for the REAP program was on May 5<sup>th</sup>, 2014 and can be viewed in the Federal Registry [https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2014/05/05/2014-10054/notice-of-funding-availability-for-the-rural-energy-for-america-program here.]'' ''The next Notice of Funding Availability will be published in the Federal Registry and on the USDA website [http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/RD_NOFAs.html here.] ''''' '''''Notably, the 2014 Farm Bill removed authority for the USDA to fund REAP feasibility studies with REAP grants.''''' The Rural Energy for America Program (REAP) provides financial assistance to agricultural producers and rural small businesses in rural America to purchase, install, and construct renewable energy systems, make energy efficiency improvements to non-residential buildings and facilities, use renewable technologies that reduce energy consumption, and participate in energy audits and renewable energy development assistance. Renewable energy projects for the Renewable Energy Systems and Energy Efficiency Improvement Guaranteed Loan and Grant Program include wind, solar, biomass and geothermal, and hydrogen derived from biomass or water using wind, solar, or geothermal energy sources. These grants are limited to 25% of a proposed project's cost, and a loan guarantee may not exceed $25 million. The combined amount of a grant and loan guarantee must be at least $5,000 (with the grant portion at least $1,500) and may not exceed 75% of the project’s cost. In general, a minimum of 20% of the funds available for these incentives will be dedicated to grants of $20,000 or less. For more information on grant, loan guarantees, loan financing, and opportunities for combinations thereof, [http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/BCP_ReapResEei_Financing.html visit the USDA website.] In 2014, $12.3 million in grants and $56.4 million in loans was awarded. For a complete list of 2014 projects, click [http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/supportdocuments/rdREAPProjectsSept2014.pdf here.] '''Eligibility''' Grants and loans are generally available to state government entities, local governments, tribal governments, land-grant colleges and universities**, rural electric cooperatives and public power entities, and other entities, as determined by the USDA. To be eligible for REAP grants and loans, an applicant must have a satisfactory revenue stream and be in control the budget, operations, and maintenance of a project for the entire duration of the loan or grant. Rural small businesses must be located in rural areas, but agricultural producers may be located in non-rural areas. Eligible project costs include purchasing energy efficiency improvements or a renewable energy system, energy audits or assessments, permitting and licensing fees, and business plans and retrofitting. For new construction the replacement of older equipment with more efficient equipment may be eligible as a project cost only when a new facility is planned to be more efficient and similarly sized than the older facility. Working capital and land acquisition are only eligible for loan guarantees. For more information regarding applicant and project eligibility for loans and grants, visit the [http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/BCP_ReapResEei_Eligibility.html USDA REAP eligibility webpage], read the [https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2014/05/05/2014-10054/notice-of-funding-availability-for-the-rural-energy-for-america-program#h-13 eligibility requirements] in the most recent Solicitation of Applications for REAP funding in the Federal Registry, and/or [http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/BCP_Energy_CoordinatorList.html contact your regional rural energy coordinator.] Regional rural energy coordinators provide loan and grant applications upon request. '''History''' ''The Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008'' ([http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=110_cong_bills&docid=f:h2419enr.txt.pdf H.R. 2419]), enacted by Congress in May 2008, converted the federal Renewable Energy Systems and Energy Efficiency Improvements Program,* into the Rural Energy for America Program (REAP). Similar to its predecessor, the REAP promotes energy efficiency and renewable energy for agricultural producers and rural small businesses through the use of (1) grants and loan guarantees for energy efficiency improvements and renewable energy systems, and (2) grants for energy audits and renewable energy development assistance. Congress has allocated funding for the new program in the following amounts: $55 million for FY 2009, $60 million for FY 2010, $70 million for FY 2011, and $70 million for FY 2012. REAP is administered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). In addition to these mandatory funding levels, up to $25 million in discretionary funding may be issued each year. The American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 (H.R. 8) extended discretionary funding for FY 2013. The 2014 Farm Bill reauthorized the USDA to offer these programs and removed the mandate to offer grants for feasibility studies.<br> <br> ''* The Renewable Energy Systems and Energy Efficiency Improvements Program was created by the USDA pursuant to Section 9006 of the 2002 federal'' ''Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002''. ''Funding in the amount of $23 million per year was appropriated for each fiscal year from FY 2003-2007. In March 2008, the USDA announced that it would accept $220.9 million in applications for grants, loan guarantees, and loan/grant combination packages under the Renewable Energy Systems and Energy Efficiency Improvements Program. The application deadline was June 16, 2008.<br> <br> **Land grant colleges and universities are referred to above as "schools" and "institutions". It is important to note that K-12 schools are not eligible for this grant.''
    schools are not eligible for this grant.''  +
  • '''''Note: The application period for 2015
    '''''Note: The application period for 2015 projects opens on December 1, 2014.'''''<br> <br> Oncor Electric Delivery offers rebates to its customers that install photovoltaic (PV) systems on homes or other buildings.* Oncor customers of all rate classes (e.g., residential, commercial) are eligible to participate in the program. The term "customer" means "the entity with financial responsibility for paying the electric bill for the meter behind which the distributed solar energy equipment is to be installed." Rebates may be assigned to the customer, a service provider, or a third party. '''Rebate Amount ''' In 2014, rebates are a one-time payment of $538.79 per kilowatt (kW)-AC and $0.41 per kilowatt hour (kWh)-AC for both residential and non-residential customers (e.g., businesses, governments, nonprofits, etc.). Under this incentive scheme, a typical 5.3 kW residential rooftop PV system can earn a total rebate of approximately $8,600. The maximum rebate is equivalent to 20% of the most recent funding allocation. Individual systems must be 1 kW or larger, unless they are to be used by schools for educational purposes. In addition, systems may not be sized to produce energy in excess of that required to meet annual on-site energy consumption. Customers may only apply for one rebate per point of service, as defined by a unique meter ESI-ID number. Customers with multiple points of service are therefore permitted to apply for multiple rebates, subject to a 20% maximum rebate cap and other program limits (e.g., limits on total incentives available to a single customer). '''Eligibility'''<br> <br> Systems must be new, connected to the grid on the customer side of the meter and meet all applicable code and utility interconnection requirements. All installations must be performed by service providers who meet specific program eligibility requirements. Service providers are also subject to ongoing quality assurance standards and are required to attend technical training sessions. Installations may be subject to a variety of inspection and performance monitoring requirements in the short- and long-term. System owners will initially retain title to renewable energy certificates (RECs) produced by their system. However, Oncor reserves the right to claim RECs produced by rebated systems at a later time. For more information, visit the program website. *''The Oncor program began as a pilot program in 2009 and provided rebates in 2009, 2010, 2011 and 2012. Oncor pays incentives to eligible Service Providers who market, sell/lease, and install solar photovoltaic systems to commercial and residential customers served by Oncor.'' ''** Oncor reserves the right to raise the incentive cap if the total amount of incentives for reserved projects is not sufficient to meet the program incentive budget.''
    nt to meet the program incentive budget.''  +
  • '''''Note: The application period for the
    '''''Note: The application period for the program ended on January 31<sup>st</sup>, 2014 with a final bid price of $0.1688/kWh awarded to 76 separate projects of total 100 MW. The program is no longer accepting any new applications; however, depending on the interconnection study results, some projects may be eliminated and replaced by next in line in queue. ''''' The PSEG Long Island Feed-in Tariff II (FIT II) program provides fixed payments for electricity produced by approved photovoltaic systems over a fixed period of time. The program operates under a sell-all arrangement, where the full amount of energy production from the facility is sold to the utility (i.e., no on-site use). Systems from 100 kilowatts (kW) to 2 megawatts (MW) that were not connected to the grid prior to the program's conditional acceptance period (anticipated to be on or around February 28, 2014) are eligible to participate. The program offers a 20-year contract at a rate determined through the Clearing Price Auction. A total of up to 100 MW of new solar generation will be supported by the FIT II program. The system size is determined as the lesser of the sum of the AC rated output of all inverters, or the PTC rating of the system multiplied by the inverter efficiency. Projects must be connected to the LIPA grid at the distribution level, defined as 13.2 kilovolts (kV) or below. Unlike the first FIT program that was offered in July 2012, applications for FIT II are not being accepted on a first-come, first-served basis. Additionally, LIPA has not selected a fixed price that qualifying projects will receive. Instead, the price will be determined based on a Clearing Price Auction. All applications received during the application period beginning October 7, 2013 through January 31, 2014 that meet an initial technical and administrative screening process will be eligible for consideration. In submitting an application, all applicants must submit a fixed price bid for the 20-year term. After an initial technical and administrative review for completeness, qualified applications will be ranked in order of their bid price. The top 10% of bid prices will be excluded from consideration in setting the Clearing Price. The remaining 90% of applications will be conditionally accepted from lowest to highest until the sooner of either 100 MW is conditionally accepted or all bids are exhausted. The bid price of the last project accepted will determine the Clearing Price and all projects will then be eligible for that price. To encourage solar investment in areas of the South Fork that will provide the greatest benefits to the LIPA electric system, a solar price premium of approximately 7 cents per kilowatt-hour will be available for projects built in the designated areas located east of LIPA’s Canal Substation in Southampton. However, that premium will only be available if LIPA receives acceptable projects totaling 40 MW or more in the targeted area. Facilities that enroll in LIPA's solar rebate programs are not eligible for the FIT. Facilities must retain qualifying facility (QF) status in order to continue to be eligible for the program.
    o continue to be eligible for the program.  +