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  • "Hazardous waste" means any solid waste or
    "Hazardous waste" means any solid waste or combination of solid wastes that because of their quantity, concentration or physical, chemical or infectious characteristics may:  cause or significantly contribute to an increase in mortality or an increase in serious irreversible or incapacitating reversible illness; or pose a substantial present or potential hazard to human health or the environment when improperly treated, stored, transported, disposed of or otherwise managed.  The law excludes drilling fluids, produced waters and other wastes associated with the exploration, development or production of crude oil or natural gas or geothermal energy from the definition of hazardous waste. Also excluded is solid waste from the extraction, beneficiation or processing of ores and minerals, including phosphate rock and overburden from the mining of uranium ore. Rules are stated for permits, storage tanks waste monitoring and testing and penalties.
    aste monitoring and testing and penalties.  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes https://openei.org/w/index.php?title=________________Appliance_Energy_Efficiency_Standards________(Maryland)&action=formeditfrom the Appliance Standards Awareness Project ([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. '' In 2004 the Energy Efficiency Standards Act (EESA of 2004) became law in the State of Maryland. The General Assembly passed the EESA to establish minimum energy efficiency standards on nine separate products. Five of the nine appliances covered by the EESA were preempted by the Federal Energy Policy Act of 2005 immediately or by the end of the year, and the remaining four were preemted in the following years. In 2007 the EESA of 2004 was amended to establish standards for seven additional types of appliances. Federal standards have since preempted the standards for all products except for the two listed below. Dates listed in parentheses signify the year when the standard took effect. * Bottle-type water dispensers (2009) * Commercial hot food holding cabinets (2009) Regulations implementing the initial set of standards under the EESA of 2004 were officially adopted by the Maryland Energy Administration (MEA) in June 2006. These new regulations incorporate the EESA amendments enacted June 2005 and address the preemption issues caused by the federal Energy Policy Act of 2005. The 2007 amendments required the Maryland Energy Administration to officially adopt regulations establishing the new standards by January 1, 2008. However, as of June 2010 this task had not been completed. The MEA may delay the effective date of any standard by up to one year if it determines that products conforming to the standard will not be widely available in Maryland by that date. Manufacturers must test products consistent with the testing standards established by the federal government in the Energy Policy Act of 2005. Manufacturers must certify to the MEA that the product is in compliance with the minimum efficiency standards. Certification, proof of testing, and labeling requirements are outlined in the EESA. Every two years the MEA is directed to consider and propose standards to the General Assembly for products not already subject to efficiency standards and revised, more stringent amendments to existing standards. ''* These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.''
    y Independence and Security Act of 2007.''  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes from the Appliance Standards Awareness Project ([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. See the Department of Energy [http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/appliance_standards/index.html Appliance Standards website for additional information on the federal standards.]'' In February 2006, Vermont established appliance efficiency legislation through bill H.0253, An Act Relating to Establishing Energy Efficiency Standards For Certain Appliances. This Act created minimum efficiency standards for certain products sold or installed in Vermont. Note, standards for medium voltage dry-type distribution transformers and metal halide lamp fixtures have been pre-empted by federal standards. The act states that the Vermont Department of Public Service must determine if standards for residential furnaces and boilers require a waiver from federal preemption and if so, must apply for a waiver. Vermont has not done so as of March 2012, and therefore, there are no active standards in VT. ''* These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.''
    y Independence and Security Act of 2007.''  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes from the Appliance Standards Awareness Project ([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. See the Department of Energy [http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/appliance_standards/index.html Appliance Standards] website for additional information.'' Massachusetts’ original appliance standards legislation was enacted in 1986. In November 2005, the standards were expanded, although to date most of the equipment listed in Massachusetts law has since been preempted by federal law. Because of the existing federal standards covering residential furnaces, boilers, and furnace fans, Massachusetts sought a waiver of federal preemption from the warm-state standard. That waiver would have allowed Massachusetts’ cold-state standard to go into effect in 2013. The Massachusetts Attorney General and the Department of Energy Resources (DOER) filed the [http://www.mass.gov/eea/pr-pre-p2/commonwealth-petitions-us-department-of-energy.html waiver petition in October 2009]. The U.S. Department of Energy responded negatively, see the [http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/appliance_standards/state_petitions.html Department of Energy web site] for more information on the petition, comments filed and denial. Therefore, there are no current appliance standards in place in MA. Testing procedures must be developed by the DOER if such procedures are not provided for in the state plumbing code. The DOER must use the U.S. Department of Energy approved test methods and manufacturers must certify that products are in compliance with the standards.The standards state that the DOER must file a biannual report on appliance efficiency standards with the Massachusetts House of Representatives including, but not limited to, an evaluation of the effectiveness of the standards on energy efficiency and energy conservation in Massachusetts. ''* These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.''
    y Independence and Security Act of 2007.''  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes from the Appliance Standards Awareness Project ([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. '' New Jersey Energy Efficiency Product Standards, enacted in 2005, include minimum standards for eight products, seven of which were immediately preempted by the federal Energy Policy Act of 2005. The efficiency standard for the one remaining product, unit heaters, was effective for a little over a year and then preempted by a federal standard in August of 2008. Future standards, if any, adopted by New Jersey will not apply to products manufactured in the State and sold outside the State, new products manufactured outside the State and sold at wholesale inside the State for final retail sale and installation outside the State, products installed in mobile manufactured homes at the time of construction, or products designed expressly for installation and use in recreational vehicles. The Board of Public Utilities (BPU) in consultation with the Commissioner of Environmental Protection, must adopt testing procedures if procedures are not provided for in the standard building code of New Jersey. The board shall use United States Department of Energy approved test methods, or other appropriate nationally-recognized test methods. Manufacturers certify to the board that products are in compliance with the standards. * ''These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. ''
    Independence and Security Act of 2007. ''  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes from the Appliance Standards Awareness Project ([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. '' California’s 2009 Appliance Efficiency Regulations (California Code of Regulations, Title 20, Sections 1601 through1608) were adopted by the California Energy Commission (CEC) on December 3, 2008, and approved by the California Office of Administrative Law on July 10, 2009, replacing all previous versions of the regulations. The Regulations create standards for twenty-three categories of appliances, including standards for both federally-regulated and non-federally-regulated appliances. Of these products, the standards now apply to the following types of new products sold, offered for sale in California, except those sold wholesale in California for final retail sale outside the state and those designed and sold exclusively for use in recreational vehicles or other mobile equipment: # Consumer audio and video products (2006/2007) # Pool pumps (2006/2008/2010) # General service incandescent light bulbs (2011) # Portable lighting fixtures (2010) # Water dispensers (2003) # Hot tubs (portable electric spas) (2009) # Commercial hot food holding cabinets (2006) # Under cabinet fluorescent lamps (2006) # Vending machines (2006) # Wine Chillers (2003) # Televisions (2011) # Small battery chargers that are consumer products (for cell phones, personal care devices, and power tools) (2/1/2013) # Large Industrial battery chargers and USB charger systems with a battery capacity of 20 Wh or more that are consumer products (1/1/2014) # Small battery chargers that are not consumer products (for items such as walkie talkies and portable barcode scanners) (1/1/2017) Dates listed above in parenthesis signify the standard’s effective date. Where more than one date is shown, the standard has more than one level or components which become effective on different dates. See regulations for specific types of appliances covered under these categories. Product-specific testing, certification, and labeling requirements are outlined in the regulations. The CEC is currently in the process of developing regulations for [http://www.energy.ca.gov/appliances/battery_chargers/ battery chargers]. California was the first state to initiate appliance efficiency standards in 1974 with the adoption of the Warren-Alquist Act, which instructed the CEC to promulgate efficiency standards. California has continued to upgrade its standards to remain consistent with new technologies. Most state standards programs have used California’s covered products, or a subset of these products, and its technical procedures as the basis for their efforts. California continues to lead the nation by being the first state to develop efficiency standards for certain [http://www.energy.ca.gov/appliances/2009_tvregs/index.html televisions]. ''* These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.''
    y Independence and Security Act of 2007.''  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes from the Appliance Standards Awareness Project ([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. '' Washington enacted appliance efficiency legislation in 2005, creating minimum efficiency standards for twelve products, all of which have been preempted by federal law. [http://apps.leg.wa.gov/documents/billdocs/2009-10/Pdf/Bills/House%20Passed%20Legislature/1004-S.PL.pdf HB 1004], signed in May 2009, added efficiency standards for several more products, which took effect January 1, 2010. These products include: # Wine chillers designed and sold for use by an individual # Hot water dispensers and mini-tank electric water heaters # Bottle-type water dispensers # Pool heaters, residential pool pumps, and portable electric spas # Commercial hot food holding cabinets Standards do not apply to new products manufactured in Washington and sold outside the State, new products manufactured outside Washington and sold at wholesale inside Washington for final retail sale and installation outside the State, products installed in mobile manufactured homes at the time of construction, or products designed expressly for installation and use in recreational vehicles. The law stipulates that existing standards and test methods may be increased and updated. Any recommendations shall be transmitted to the appropriate committees of the legislature sixty days before the start of any regular legislative session. ''* These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.''
    y Independence and Security Act of 2007.''  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes from the Appliance Standards Awareness Project ([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. '' Arizona’s Appliance and Equipment Efficiency Standards (Arizona Revised Statutes, Title 44, Section 1375) set minimum energy efficiency standards for twelve products, all of which have since been preempted by federal regulation. HB 2332 of 2009 established new standards, effective January 1, 2012 for three additional products: #Portable electric spas #Residential pool pumps #Residential pool pump motors. Specific testing requirements and minimum standards are outlined in the regulations. Manufacturers must certify to the Arizona Department of Commerce Energy Office that products meet minimum efficiency standards. Certification to other states with similar standards that publish databases of compliant products is permitted as an alternative to certifying to the Arizona Department of Commerce Energy Office. New products manufactured in Arizona and sold outside the State are not covered by the regulations. Additionally, the regulations do not apply to products installed in mobile manufactured homes at time of construction, products designed exclusively for installation and use in recreational vehicles, and products installed in a laundry facility located within an apartment complex or mobile home park. The standards stipulate that beginning on May 31, 2008, and every three years thereafter, the Arizona Department of Commerce Energy Office must conduct a comparative review and assessment of the standards and energy efficiency standards adopted in other states and submit a report of its findings and recommendations to the speaker of the house of representatives and president of the senate. ''* These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.''
    y Independence and Security Act of 2007.''  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes from the Appliance Standards Awareness Project ([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. '' Connecticut enacted efficiency standards through legislative actions in 2004 and 2007 and 2011. This law covers the following products that have not been pre-empted by federal standards: (Dates listed in parenthesis signify the year the standard took effect.) * Bottle-type water dispensers (2009) * Commercial hot food holding cabinets (2009) * Hot tubs (2009) * Swimming pool pumps (2010) * Compact Audio Equipment** * DVD Players and Recorders** * Televisions** The standards apply to products manufactured in Connecticut and sold inside the state. Manufacturers must certify to the Secretary of the Office of Policy Management that products comply with the regulations. The standards must be reviewed biennially and increased if it is determined that increased efficiency standards would serve to promote energy conservation and would be cost-effective for consumers. Standards for additional products may be adopted if it is determined that they would serve to promote energy conservation in the state, would be cost-effective for consumers, and that multiple products are available which meet such standards. ''* These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.'' ''**Adopted per legislation enacted July 2011 (SB 1243).''
    legislation enacted July 2011 (SB 1243).''  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes from the Appliance Standards Awareness Project([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. '' New York appliance efficiency standards legislation, enacted in 2005, covers the following products offered for sale in New York not preempted by federal standards as of August 2011: # Consumer audio and video products # Digital television adapters # Commercial hot food holding cabinets # Portable electric spas # Residential pool pumps # Bottle-type water dispensers # Portable light fixtures For consumer audio and video products and digital television adapters, the New York legislation requires the Department of State in consultation with New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) to develop standards by June 30, 2006 and to implement such standards no sooner than six months after issuing final rules. Temporary emergency rules were adopted and renewed several times during 2006 and 2007 but have since expired and not been renewed. The regulatory process for these equipment types appears to be ongoing as of August 2012. Efficiency requirements for the remaining products were adopted by legislation in 2010. The legislation required the Department of State in consultation with NYSERDA to develop regulations by December 31, 2010. As of August 2012, no such regulations have been adopted. New York law also allows the Secretary of State, in consultation with NYSERDA, to add additional products to the list. Any new products added to the list must be commercially available, cost effective on a life-cycle basis, and not covered under existing federal standards. ''* These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.''
    y Independence and Security Act of 2007.''  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes from the Appliance Standards Awareness Project ([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. '' In June 2005, Oregon passed legislation setting minimum energy efficiency standards for 11 appliances. Those products regulated by Oregon law and not currently covered by federal standards include: (Dates listed in parenthesis signify the effective year.) # Bottle-type water dispensers (2009) # Commercial hot food holding cabinets (2009) # Compact audio products (2009) # Digital versatile disc players and digital versatile disc recorders (2009) # Portable electric spas (2009) Testing requirements and minimum efficiency standards are outlined in the regulations. The standards do not apply to products installed in a mobile or manufactured home at the time of construction or designed expressly for installation and use in recreational vehicles. The law stipulates that the State Department of Energy must periodically review the minimum energy efficiency standards and report to the Legislative Assembly when the standards need to be updated, due to federal action or to the outcome of collaborative consultations with manufacturers and the energy departments of other states. ''* These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.''
    y Independence and Security Act of 2007.''  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes from the Appliance Standards Awareness Project ([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site and the U.S. Department of Energy's [http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/appliance_standards/index.html Appliance Standards] site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. '' Rhode Island’s Energy and Consumer Savings Act of 2005 established minimum energy efficiency standards for twelve commercial and residential products, nine of which were immediately preempted by federal law later that year, and another of which was preempted later. Thus far, Rhode Island has adopted and enforces standards for bottle-type water dispensers, mercury vapor lamp ballasts and commercial hot-food holding cabinets. Testing procedures for energy efficiency not provided for in Rhode Island law or in the State Building Code may be adopted from the test methods approved by the U.S. Department of Energy, or in the absence of such test methods, other appropriate nationally recognized test methods. The state may use updated test methods when new versions of test procedures become available. State law allows for the efficiency of existing standards to be increased. In considering amending the standards, the state must must determine that increased efficiency standards would serve to promote energy conservation in Rhode Island and would be cost-effective for consumers who purchase and use such products. ''* These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.''
    y Independence and Security Act of 2007.''  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes from the Appliance Standards Awareness Project ([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. '' In 2007 the District of Columbia (D.C.) enacted legislation, entitled the Energy Efficiency Standards Act of 2007, which created efficiency standards for six products, four of which were immediately preempted by federal law. The efficiency standards thereby apply to bottle-type water dispensers and commercial hot food holding cabinets sold in D.C. on or after January 1, 2009 and installed on or after January 1, 2010. The standards do not apply to new products manufactured in District of Columbia that are sold either outside of D.C. or sold wholesale within D.C. for final retail sale/installation outside of D.C. The standards do not apply to products installed in mobile homes at the time of construction or to products designed for installation and use within recreational vehicles. While these standards apply currently to two products, § 8-1771.04 establishes that the Mayor may adopt rules to either 1) increase efficiency standards for the listed products or 2) establish efficiency standards for products not listed if he/she feels it necessary to further promote energy conservation in D.C. The law further stipulates requirements for testing and certification. ''* These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.''
    y Independence and Security Act of 2007.''  +
  • ''' *Program discontinued''' The Tennesse
    ''' *Program discontinued''' The Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development offers low-interest loans of up to $300,000, with terms of up to 7 years, for energy efficiency projects and other projects shown to save energy or decrease energy demand. Businesses with fewer than 300 employees or less than $3.5 million in annual gross sales or receipts are eligible. The loan is offered with a 0% interest rate for businesses in the Three-Star communities, and at a 3% interest rate for all others. Loans cannot be used for new construction or business start-up. All renewable energy technologies are eligible under the program's guidelines. In addition to low-interest loans, the Energy Division offers free audits and technical assistance.
    fers free audits and technical assistance.  +
  • ''' Note: The Sustainable Energy Fund is n
    ''' Note: The Sustainable Energy Fund is not soliciting grant applications at this time. Please see information about the SEF's loan program.''' The Sustainable Energy Fund of Central Eastern Pennsylvania (SEF) disburses a limited number of grants and loans to organizations seeking funding for projects consistent with the Fund’s mission "to promote research and invest in clean and renewable energy technologies, energy conservation, energy efficiency and sustainable energy enterprises that provide opportunities and benefits for PP&L ratepayers." Research projects are not eligible for grant financing. The SEF was founded in November 1999 as a result of the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission electric utility restructuring proceedings. The SEF was a key component of the joint settlement with PP&L, Inc. (now PP&L Electric Utilities Corporation) and the PUC. The initial SEF funding of approximately $20.5 million will be generated over six years through a rate surcharge on PPL ratepayers. . See DSIRE's summary of Pennsylvania's Public Benefits Funds for more information.
    ublic Benefits Funds for more information.  +
  • ''' Note: The deadline for new application
    ''' Note: The deadline for new applications has now expired, but it is anticipated that the program will be renewed at some point in the future. ''' The Green Business Building Pilot Program will provide grants of up to $100,000 per facility for design assistance for private-sector construction projects that meet a minimum LEED level of gold and achieve energy performance of at least 20 percent above the minimum energy code, while achieving minimum standards for best practices in solid waste management. Eligible facilities must have a minimum of 50,000 square feet of conditioned space, and program participants must contribute a minimum of 10 percent of the total project costs associated with the fees for building design services. Hopeful participants must submit a notice of intent to apply no later than November 15, 2006, and must be able to verify that their project funding is in place and can establish an 18-month deadline by which final construction documents will be completed. Final applications for the grant are due January 2, 2007.
    ons for the grant are due January 2, 2007.  +
  • ''' Note: The program has been suspended a
    ''' Note: The program has been suspended and is undergoing redevelopment. Please check back for future updates. ''' Modeled after the successful Sustainable and Natural Alternative Power (SNAP) program in Chelan County, Washington, Rochester Public Utility's Solar Choice program encourages customers to install photovoltaic solar arrays and connect them to their utilities' electrical distribution system by offering an incentive payment based on the system's production on a $/kWh basis. The amount paid by each participating utility to its solar energy producers depends on the total amount contributed by that utility's purchasers through their solar green pricing program. The greater the amount contributed by purchasers, the greater the amount that will be distributed among participating producers, up to a maximum of $1.00 per kWh. This amount is considered payment for the green attributes of the electricity only, and is additional to retail rates the producer may receive for their electricity under the state's net metering laws. Producers are compensated for the total electricity produced, not the total exported to the grid. The maximum generation project that may be interconnected with the distribution system is 40 kilowatts. Solar Choice is not for customers who want to install renewable energy sources for back-up power generation at their home or business. This program began on October 1, 2005. Actual rates paid to producers will be posted annually.
    paid to producers will be posted annually.  +
  • ''' Note: This program is presently suspen
    ''' Note: This program is presently suspended pending a restructuring of the incentive. Owatonna hopes to reintroduce the program in 2008 as a per KW rebate designed to reduce the up front cost of installing a PV system. ''' Modeled after the successful Sustainable and Natural Alternative Power (SNAP) program in Chelan County, Washington, Owatonna Public Utility's Solar Choice program encourages customers to install photovoltaic solar arrays and connect them to their utilities' electrical distribution system by offering an incentive payment based on the system's production on a $/kWh basis. The amount paid by each participating utility to its solar energy producers depends on the total amount contributed by that utility's purchasers through their solar green pricing program. The greater the amount contributed by purchasers, the greater the amount that will be distributed among participating producers, up to a maximum of $1.00 per kWh. This amount is considered payment for the green attributes of the electricity only, and is additional to retail rates the producer may receive for their electricity under the state's net metering laws. Producers are compensated for the total electricity produced, not the total exported to the grid. The maximum generation project that may be interconnected with the distribution system is 40 kilowatts. Solar Choice is not for customers who want to install renewable energy sources for back-up power generation at their home or business. This program began on October 1, 2005. Actual rates paid to producers will be posted annually.
    paid to producers will be posted annually.  +
  • ''' Note: program removed, included in Eff
    ''' Note: program removed, included in Efficiency United''' Through Efficiency United, Michigan Gas Utilities offers several incentive options to eligible commercial and industrial customers. The programs incent customers to save energy and money through the use of energy efficient technologies. The Prescriptive Gas Measures for Business Customers Program offers various rebates and incentives to commercial and industrial gas customers in the Michigan Gas Utilities service area. Equipment and measures are meant to increase the efficiency and the cost effectiveness of running a customer's business. All equipment must be new and replacing an older system or model. Eligible equipment and measures include steam trap tests and replacements, boilers, boiler tune-ups and controls, pipe wrap, furnaces, infrared heaters, programmable thermostats, occupancy sensors, water heaters, clothes washers and pool heaters. Itemized invoices of equipment costs and installation labor must be included along with new equipment specification sheet. Please wait to receive approval before starting work. Projects must be implemented by December 31, 2010. View program web site listed above to see guidelines and application form. The Commercial and Industrial (C&I) Custom Program provides custom incentives to C&I customers for the installation of energy-efficient equipment and controls. The custom program allows measures and systems to be installed for situations unique to that customer's application or process. MGU will pay up to 40% of a projects cost up to $10,000. Applicants must receive approval prior to beginning project. Rebates will not be provided for project with a payback less than 2 years or greater than 7 years. Complete form and attach invoice of all project costs. Applicants have 120 days to implement project after approval is granted. An application can be found on the program web site listed above. Through the Residential and Small Business Energy Star Program, rebates are also available for water heaters, pipe wrap, faucet aerators and clothes washers. See program [http://www.efficiencyunited.com/resources/Energy_Star_Incentive_Request_Form_MGU.pdf application] for more details on equipment and eligibility.
    more details on equipment and eligibility.  +
  • ''''' Deadline for submissions was July 30
    ''''' Deadline for submissions was July 30, 2010. Applications received after this date will not be considered.''''' The Wisconsin Department of Commerce is offering low-interest loans to for-profit manufacturing companies for projects that support renewable energy and energy efficiency jobs within the state. The program is only available for businesses locating or expanding within the state of Wisconsin. Loans will be issued for up to 25% of project cost at a fixed interest rate of 2% over terms of 5-7 years (working capital) or 5-10 years (equipment). Loan repayment may be deferred for up to one year. The program is intended for businesses that promote: * major renewable energy production projects; * the manufacture of clean energy products; * advanced manufacturing of clean energy components; * retooling to provide component parts and other critical needs for a successful, totally integrated supply chain; * improving industrial users’ competitiveness through energy efficiency and renewable energy deployment. The definitions of eligible renewable energy and energy efficiency related technologies are not specified, but the program website gives several examples possible projects. Project eligibility is limited to those that create or retain jobs through clean energy advanced manufacturing, clean energy supply chain development, and through reduction in the use of fossil fuels at industrial facilities, including the integration of renewable energy into industrial processes. Funds specifically may not be used for construction or building repairs; to purchase buildings or land; or to perform research, development, and demonstration activities for non-commercial technologies. Projects that have already obtained other necessary financing pieces; environmental and zoning permits; and other clearances will be given a high priority under this program. Money to fund this program comes from State Energy Program funds under the federal American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009, otherwise known as the federal stimulus bill. Currently, $28 million in funding is available through this program with up to $5 million set aside for applications in state's cheese industry. The program is eventually expected to have a total budget of $55 million. Please consult the program website for further details or contact the appropriate [http://commerce.wi.gov/BD/BD-AreaDevManagers.html Commerce Area Development Manager] to discuss your project.
    elopment Manager] to discuss your project.  +