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  • "Hazardous waste" means any solid waste or
    "Hazardous waste" means any solid waste or combination of solid wastes that because of their quantity, concentration or physical, chemical or infectious characteristics may:  cause or significantly contribute to an increase in mortality or an increase in serious irreversible or incapacitating reversible illness; or pose a substantial present or potential hazard to human health or the environment when improperly treated, stored, transported, disposed of or otherwise managed.  The law excludes drilling fluids, produced waters and other wastes associated with the exploration, development or production of crude oil or natural gas or geothermal energy from the definition of hazardous waste. Also excluded is solid waste from the extraction, beneficiation or processing of ores and minerals, including phosphate rock and overburden from the mining of uranium ore. Rules are stated for permits, storage tanks waste monitoring and testing and penalties.
    aste monitoring and testing and penalties.  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes https://openei.org/w/index.php?title=________________Appliance_Energy_Efficiency_Standards________(Maryland)&action=formeditfrom the Appliance Standards Awareness Project ([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. '' In 2004 the Energy Efficiency Standards Act (EESA of 2004) became law in the State of Maryland. The General Assembly passed the EESA to establish minimum energy efficiency standards on nine separate products. Five of the nine appliances covered by the EESA were preempted by the Federal Energy Policy Act of 2005 immediately or by the end of the year, and the remaining four were preemted in the following years. In 2007 the EESA of 2004 was amended to establish standards for seven additional types of appliances. Federal standards have since preempted the standards for all products except for the two listed below. Dates listed in parentheses signify the year when the standard took effect. * Bottle-type water dispensers (2009) * Commercial hot food holding cabinets (2009) Regulations implementing the initial set of standards under the EESA of 2004 were officially adopted by the Maryland Energy Administration (MEA) in June 2006. These new regulations incorporate the EESA amendments enacted June 2005 and address the preemption issues caused by the federal Energy Policy Act of 2005. The 2007 amendments required the Maryland Energy Administration to officially adopt regulations establishing the new standards by January 1, 2008. However, as of June 2010 this task had not been completed. The MEA may delay the effective date of any standard by up to one year if it determines that products conforming to the standard will not be widely available in Maryland by that date. Manufacturers must test products consistent with the testing standards established by the federal government in the Energy Policy Act of 2005. Manufacturers must certify to the MEA that the product is in compliance with the minimum efficiency standards. Certification, proof of testing, and labeling requirements are outlined in the EESA. Every two years the MEA is directed to consider and propose standards to the General Assembly for products not already subject to efficiency standards and revised, more stringent amendments to existing standards. ''* These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.''
    y Independence and Security Act of 2007.''  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes from the Appliance Standards Awareness Project ([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. See the Department of Energy [http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/appliance_standards/index.html Appliance Standards website for additional information on the federal standards.]'' In February 2006, Vermont established appliance efficiency legislation through bill H.0253, An Act Relating to Establishing Energy Efficiency Standards For Certain Appliances. This Act created minimum efficiency standards for certain products sold or installed in Vermont. Note, standards for medium voltage dry-type distribution transformers and metal halide lamp fixtures have been pre-empted by federal standards. The act states that the Vermont Department of Public Service must determine if standards for residential furnaces and boilers require a waiver from federal preemption and if so, must apply for a waiver. Vermont has not done so as of March 2012, and therefore, there are no active standards in VT. ''* These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.''
    y Independence and Security Act of 2007.''  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes from the Appliance Standards Awareness Project ([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. See the Department of Energy [http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/appliance_standards/index.html Appliance Standards] website for additional information.'' Massachusetts’ original appliance standards legislation was enacted in 1986. In November 2005, the standards were expanded, although to date most of the equipment listed in Massachusetts law has since been preempted by federal law. Because of the existing federal standards covering residential furnaces, boilers, and furnace fans, Massachusetts sought a waiver of federal preemption from the warm-state standard. That waiver would have allowed Massachusetts’ cold-state standard to go into effect in 2013. The Massachusetts Attorney General and the Department of Energy Resources (DOER) filed the [http://www.mass.gov/eea/pr-pre-p2/commonwealth-petitions-us-department-of-energy.html waiver petition in October 2009]. The U.S. Department of Energy responded negatively, see the [http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/appliance_standards/state_petitions.html Department of Energy web site] for more information on the petition, comments filed and denial. Therefore, there are no current appliance standards in place in MA. Testing procedures must be developed by the DOER if such procedures are not provided for in the state plumbing code. The DOER must use the U.S. Department of Energy approved test methods and manufacturers must certify that products are in compliance with the standards.The standards state that the DOER must file a biannual report on appliance efficiency standards with the Massachusetts House of Representatives including, but not limited to, an evaluation of the effectiveness of the standards on energy efficiency and energy conservation in Massachusetts. ''* These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.''
    y Independence and Security Act of 2007.''  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes from the Appliance Standards Awareness Project ([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. '' New Jersey Energy Efficiency Product Standards, enacted in 2005, include minimum standards for eight products, seven of which were immediately preempted by the federal Energy Policy Act of 2005. The efficiency standard for the one remaining product, unit heaters, was effective for a little over a year and then preempted by a federal standard in August of 2008. Future standards, if any, adopted by New Jersey will not apply to products manufactured in the State and sold outside the State, new products manufactured outside the State and sold at wholesale inside the State for final retail sale and installation outside the State, products installed in mobile manufactured homes at the time of construction, or products designed expressly for installation and use in recreational vehicles. The Board of Public Utilities (BPU) in consultation with the Commissioner of Environmental Protection, must adopt testing procedures if procedures are not provided for in the standard building code of New Jersey. The board shall use United States Department of Energy approved test methods, or other appropriate nationally-recognized test methods. Manufacturers certify to the board that products are in compliance with the standards. * ''These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. ''
    Independence and Security Act of 2007. ''  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes from the Appliance Standards Awareness Project ([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. '' California’s 2009 Appliance Efficiency Regulations (California Code of Regulations, Title 20, Sections 1601 through1608) were adopted by the California Energy Commission (CEC) on December 3, 2008, and approved by the California Office of Administrative Law on July 10, 2009, replacing all previous versions of the regulations. The Regulations create standards for twenty-three categories of appliances, including standards for both federally-regulated and non-federally-regulated appliances. Of these products, the standards now apply to the following types of new products sold, offered for sale in California, except those sold wholesale in California for final retail sale outside the state and those designed and sold exclusively for use in recreational vehicles or other mobile equipment: # Consumer audio and video products (2006/2007) # Pool pumps (2006/2008/2010) # General service incandescent light bulbs (2011) # Portable lighting fixtures (2010) # Water dispensers (2003) # Hot tubs (portable electric spas) (2009) # Commercial hot food holding cabinets (2006) # Under cabinet fluorescent lamps (2006) # Vending machines (2006) # Wine Chillers (2003) # Televisions (2011) # Small battery chargers that are consumer products (for cell phones, personal care devices, and power tools) (2/1/2013) # Large Industrial battery chargers and USB charger systems with a battery capacity of 20 Wh or more that are consumer products (1/1/2014) # Small battery chargers that are not consumer products (for items such as walkie talkies and portable barcode scanners) (1/1/2017) Dates listed above in parenthesis signify the standard’s effective date. Where more than one date is shown, the standard has more than one level or components which become effective on different dates. See regulations for specific types of appliances covered under these categories. Product-specific testing, certification, and labeling requirements are outlined in the regulations. The CEC is currently in the process of developing regulations for [http://www.energy.ca.gov/appliances/battery_chargers/ battery chargers]. California was the first state to initiate appliance efficiency standards in 1974 with the adoption of the Warren-Alquist Act, which instructed the CEC to promulgate efficiency standards. California has continued to upgrade its standards to remain consistent with new technologies. Most state standards programs have used California’s covered products, or a subset of these products, and its technical procedures as the basis for their efforts. California continues to lead the nation by being the first state to develop efficiency standards for certain [http://www.energy.ca.gov/appliances/2009_tvregs/index.html televisions]. ''* These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.''
    y Independence and Security Act of 2007.''  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes from the Appliance Standards Awareness Project ([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. '' Washington enacted appliance efficiency legislation in 2005, creating minimum efficiency standards for twelve products, all of which have been preempted by federal law. [http://apps.leg.wa.gov/documents/billdocs/2009-10/Pdf/Bills/House%20Passed%20Legislature/1004-S.PL.pdf HB 1004], signed in May 2009, added efficiency standards for several more products, which took effect January 1, 2010. These products include: # Wine chillers designed and sold for use by an individual # Hot water dispensers and mini-tank electric water heaters # Bottle-type water dispensers # Pool heaters, residential pool pumps, and portable electric spas # Commercial hot food holding cabinets Standards do not apply to new products manufactured in Washington and sold outside the State, new products manufactured outside Washington and sold at wholesale inside Washington for final retail sale and installation outside the State, products installed in mobile manufactured homes at the time of construction, or products designed expressly for installation and use in recreational vehicles. The law stipulates that existing standards and test methods may be increased and updated. Any recommendations shall be transmitted to the appropriate committees of the legislature sixty days before the start of any regular legislative session. ''* These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.''
    y Independence and Security Act of 2007.''  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes from the Appliance Standards Awareness Project ([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. '' Arizona’s Appliance and Equipment Efficiency Standards (Arizona Revised Statutes, Title 44, Section 1375) set minimum energy efficiency standards for twelve products, all of which have since been preempted by federal regulation. HB 2332 of 2009 established new standards, effective January 1, 2012 for three additional products: #Portable electric spas #Residential pool pumps #Residential pool pump motors. Specific testing requirements and minimum standards are outlined in the regulations. Manufacturers must certify to the Arizona Department of Commerce Energy Office that products meet minimum efficiency standards. Certification to other states with similar standards that publish databases of compliant products is permitted as an alternative to certifying to the Arizona Department of Commerce Energy Office. New products manufactured in Arizona and sold outside the State are not covered by the regulations. Additionally, the regulations do not apply to products installed in mobile manufactured homes at time of construction, products designed exclusively for installation and use in recreational vehicles, and products installed in a laundry facility located within an apartment complex or mobile home park. The standards stipulate that beginning on May 31, 2008, and every three years thereafter, the Arizona Department of Commerce Energy Office must conduct a comparative review and assessment of the standards and energy efficiency standards adopted in other states and submit a report of its findings and recommendations to the speaker of the house of representatives and president of the senate. ''* These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.''
    y Independence and Security Act of 2007.''  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes from the Appliance Standards Awareness Project ([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. '' Connecticut enacted efficiency standards through legislative actions in 2004 and 2007 and 2011. This law covers the following products that have not been pre-empted by federal standards: (Dates listed in parenthesis signify the year the standard took effect.) * Bottle-type water dispensers (2009) * Commercial hot food holding cabinets (2009) * Hot tubs (2009) * Swimming pool pumps (2010) * Compact Audio Equipment** * DVD Players and Recorders** * Televisions** The standards apply to products manufactured in Connecticut and sold inside the state. Manufacturers must certify to the Secretary of the Office of Policy Management that products comply with the regulations. The standards must be reviewed biennially and increased if it is determined that increased efficiency standards would serve to promote energy conservation and would be cost-effective for consumers. Standards for additional products may be adopted if it is determined that they would serve to promote energy conservation in the state, would be cost-effective for consumers, and that multiple products are available which meet such standards. ''* These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.'' ''**Adopted per legislation enacted July 2011 (SB 1243).''
    legislation enacted July 2011 (SB 1243).''  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes from the Appliance Standards Awareness Project([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. '' New York appliance efficiency standards legislation, enacted in 2005, covers the following products offered for sale in New York not preempted by federal standards as of August 2011: # Consumer audio and video products # Digital television adapters # Commercial hot food holding cabinets # Portable electric spas # Residential pool pumps # Bottle-type water dispensers # Portable light fixtures For consumer audio and video products and digital television adapters, the New York legislation requires the Department of State in consultation with New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) to develop standards by June 30, 2006 and to implement such standards no sooner than six months after issuing final rules. Temporary emergency rules were adopted and renewed several times during 2006 and 2007 but have since expired and not been renewed. The regulatory process for these equipment types appears to be ongoing as of August 2012. Efficiency requirements for the remaining products were adopted by legislation in 2010. The legislation required the Department of State in consultation with NYSERDA to develop regulations by December 31, 2010. As of August 2012, no such regulations have been adopted. New York law also allows the Secretary of State, in consultation with NYSERDA, to add additional products to the list. Any new products added to the list must be commercially available, cost effective on a life-cycle basis, and not covered under existing federal standards. ''* These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.''
    y Independence and Security Act of 2007.''  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes from the Appliance Standards Awareness Project ([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. '' In June 2005, Oregon passed legislation setting minimum energy efficiency standards for 11 appliances. Those products regulated by Oregon law and not currently covered by federal standards include: (Dates listed in parenthesis signify the effective year.) # Bottle-type water dispensers (2009) # Commercial hot food holding cabinets (2009) # Compact audio products (2009) # Digital versatile disc players and digital versatile disc recorders (2009) # Portable electric spas (2009) Testing requirements and minimum efficiency standards are outlined in the regulations. The standards do not apply to products installed in a mobile or manufactured home at the time of construction or designed expressly for installation and use in recreational vehicles. The law stipulates that the State Department of Energy must periodically review the minimum energy efficiency standards and report to the Legislative Assembly when the standards need to be updated, due to federal action or to the outcome of collaborative consultations with manufacturers and the energy departments of other states. ''* These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.''
    y Independence and Security Act of 2007.''  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes from the Appliance Standards Awareness Project ([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site and the U.S. Department of Energy's [http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/appliance_standards/index.html Appliance Standards] site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. '' Rhode Island’s Energy and Consumer Savings Act of 2005 established minimum energy efficiency standards for twelve commercial and residential products, nine of which were immediately preempted by federal law later that year, and another of which was preempted later. Thus far, Rhode Island has adopted and enforces standards for bottle-type water dispensers, mercury vapor lamp ballasts and commercial hot-food holding cabinets. Testing procedures for energy efficiency not provided for in Rhode Island law or in the State Building Code may be adopted from the test methods approved by the U.S. Department of Energy, or in the absence of such test methods, other appropriate nationally recognized test methods. The state may use updated test methods when new versions of test procedures become available. State law allows for the efficiency of existing standards to be increased. In considering amending the standards, the state must must determine that increased efficiency standards would serve to promote energy conservation in Rhode Island and would be cost-effective for consumers who purchase and use such products. ''* These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.''
    y Independence and Security Act of 2007.''  +
  • '' Note: The federal government has impose
    '' Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of products. In general, states which had set standards prior to federal action may enforce their own standards until the federal standards take effect. States that had not set standards prior to federal action must use the federal standards. This summary addresses (1) state appliance standards that will be in place until the federal standards take effect and (2) products for which the federal government is not currently developing an efficiency standard. Much of the information in this summary comes from the Appliance Standards Awareness Project ([http://www.standardsasap.org/ ASAP]). Visit the ASAP web site for comprehensive information about appliance standards. '' In 2007 the District of Columbia (D.C.) enacted legislation, entitled the Energy Efficiency Standards Act of 2007, which created efficiency standards for six products, four of which were immediately preempted by federal law. The efficiency standards thereby apply to bottle-type water dispensers and commercial hot food holding cabinets sold in D.C. on or after January 1, 2009 and installed on or after January 1, 2010. The standards do not apply to new products manufactured in District of Columbia that are sold either outside of D.C. or sold wholesale within D.C. for final retail sale/installation outside of D.C. The standards do not apply to products installed in mobile homes at the time of construction or to products designed for installation and use within recreational vehicles. While these standards apply currently to two products, § 8-1771.04 establishes that the Mayor may adopt rules to either 1) increase efficiency standards for the listed products or 2) establish efficiency standards for products not listed if he/she feels it necessary to further promote energy conservation in D.C. The law further stipulates requirements for testing and certification. ''* These acts include the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.''
    y Independence and Security Act of 2007.''  +
  • ''' *Program discontinued''' The Tennesse
    ''' *Program discontinued''' The Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development offers low-interest loans of up to $300,000, with terms of up to 7 years, for energy efficiency projects and other projects shown to save energy or decrease energy demand. Businesses with fewer than 300 employees or less than $3.5 million in annual gross sales or receipts are eligible. The loan is offered with a 0% interest rate for businesses in the Three-Star communities, and at a 3% interest rate for all others. Loans cannot be used for new construction or business start-up. All renewable energy technologies are eligible under the program's guidelines. In addition to low-interest loans, the Energy Division offers free audits and technical assistance.
    fers free audits and technical assistance.  +
  • ''' Note: The Sustainable Energy Fund is n
    ''' Note: The Sustainable Energy Fund is not soliciting grant applications at this time. Please see information about the SEF's loan program.''' The Sustainable Energy Fund of Central Eastern Pennsylvania (SEF) disburses a limited number of grants and loans to organizations seeking funding for projects consistent with the Fund’s mission "to promote research and invest in clean and renewable energy technologies, energy conservation, energy efficiency and sustainable energy enterprises that provide opportunities and benefits for PP&L ratepayers." Research projects are not eligible for grant financing. The SEF was founded in November 1999 as a result of the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission electric utility restructuring proceedings. The SEF was a key component of the joint settlement with PP&L, Inc. (now PP&L Electric Utilities Corporation) and the PUC. The initial SEF funding of approximately $20.5 million will be generated over six years through a rate surcharge on PPL ratepayers. . See DSIRE's summary of Pennsylvania's Public Benefits Funds for more information.
    ublic Benefits Funds for more information.  +
  • ''' Note: The deadline for new application
    ''' Note: The deadline for new applications has now expired, but it is anticipated that the program will be renewed at some point in the future. ''' The Green Business Building Pilot Program will provide grants of up to $100,000 per facility for design assistance for private-sector construction projects that meet a minimum LEED level of gold and achieve energy performance of at least 20 percent above the minimum energy code, while achieving minimum standards for best practices in solid waste management. Eligible facilities must have a minimum of 50,000 square feet of conditioned space, and program participants must contribute a minimum of 10 percent of the total project costs associated with the fees for building design services. Hopeful participants must submit a notice of intent to apply no later than November 15, 2006, and must be able to verify that their project funding is in place and can establish an 18-month deadline by which final construction documents will be completed. Final applications for the grant are due January 2, 2007.
    ons for the grant are due January 2, 2007.  +
  • ''' Note: The program has been suspended a
    ''' Note: The program has been suspended and is undergoing redevelopment. Please check back for future updates. ''' Modeled after the successful Sustainable and Natural Alternative Power (SNAP) program in Chelan County, Washington, Rochester Public Utility's Solar Choice program encourages customers to install photovoltaic solar arrays and connect them to their utilities' electrical distribution system by offering an incentive payment based on the system's production on a $/kWh basis. The amount paid by each participating utility to its solar energy producers depends on the total amount contributed by that utility's purchasers through their solar green pricing program. The greater the amount contributed by purchasers, the greater the amount that will be distributed among participating producers, up to a maximum of $1.00 per kWh. This amount is considered payment for the green attributes of the electricity only, and is additional to retail rates the producer may receive for their electricity under the state's net metering laws. Producers are compensated for the total electricity produced, not the total exported to the grid. The maximum generation project that may be interconnected with the distribution system is 40 kilowatts. Solar Choice is not for customers who want to install renewable energy sources for back-up power generation at their home or business. This program began on October 1, 2005. Actual rates paid to producers will be posted annually.
    paid to producers will be posted annually.  +
  • ''' Note: This program is presently suspen
    ''' Note: This program is presently suspended pending a restructuring of the incentive. Owatonna hopes to reintroduce the program in 2008 as a per KW rebate designed to reduce the up front cost of installing a PV system. ''' Modeled after the successful Sustainable and Natural Alternative Power (SNAP) program in Chelan County, Washington, Owatonna Public Utility's Solar Choice program encourages customers to install photovoltaic solar arrays and connect them to their utilities' electrical distribution system by offering an incentive payment based on the system's production on a $/kWh basis. The amount paid by each participating utility to its solar energy producers depends on the total amount contributed by that utility's purchasers through their solar green pricing program. The greater the amount contributed by purchasers, the greater the amount that will be distributed among participating producers, up to a maximum of $1.00 per kWh. This amount is considered payment for the green attributes of the electricity only, and is additional to retail rates the producer may receive for their electricity under the state's net metering laws. Producers are compensated for the total electricity produced, not the total exported to the grid. The maximum generation project that may be interconnected with the distribution system is 40 kilowatts. Solar Choice is not for customers who want to install renewable energy sources for back-up power generation at their home or business. This program began on October 1, 2005. Actual rates paid to producers will be posted annually.
    paid to producers will be posted annually.  +
  • ''' Note: program removed, included in Eff
    ''' Note: program removed, included in Efficiency United''' Through Efficiency United, Michigan Gas Utilities offers several incentive options to eligible commercial and industrial customers. The programs incent customers to save energy and money through the use of energy efficient technologies. The Prescriptive Gas Measures for Business Customers Program offers various rebates and incentives to commercial and industrial gas customers in the Michigan Gas Utilities service area. Equipment and measures are meant to increase the efficiency and the cost effectiveness of running a customer's business. All equipment must be new and replacing an older system or model. Eligible equipment and measures include steam trap tests and replacements, boilers, boiler tune-ups and controls, pipe wrap, furnaces, infrared heaters, programmable thermostats, occupancy sensors, water heaters, clothes washers and pool heaters. Itemized invoices of equipment costs and installation labor must be included along with new equipment specification sheet. Please wait to receive approval before starting work. Projects must be implemented by December 31, 2010. View program web site listed above to see guidelines and application form. The Commercial and Industrial (C&I) Custom Program provides custom incentives to C&I customers for the installation of energy-efficient equipment and controls. The custom program allows measures and systems to be installed for situations unique to that customer's application or process. MGU will pay up to 40% of a projects cost up to $10,000. Applicants must receive approval prior to beginning project. Rebates will not be provided for project with a payback less than 2 years or greater than 7 years. Complete form and attach invoice of all project costs. Applicants have 120 days to implement project after approval is granted. An application can be found on the program web site listed above. Through the Residential and Small Business Energy Star Program, rebates are also available for water heaters, pipe wrap, faucet aerators and clothes washers. See program [http://www.efficiencyunited.com/resources/Energy_Star_Incentive_Request_Form_MGU.pdf application] for more details on equipment and eligibility.
    more details on equipment and eligibility.  +
  • ''''' Deadline for submissions was July 30
    ''''' Deadline for submissions was July 30, 2010. Applications received after this date will not be considered.''''' The Wisconsin Department of Commerce is offering low-interest loans to for-profit manufacturing companies for projects that support renewable energy and energy efficiency jobs within the state. The program is only available for businesses locating or expanding within the state of Wisconsin. Loans will be issued for up to 25% of project cost at a fixed interest rate of 2% over terms of 5-7 years (working capital) or 5-10 years (equipment). Loan repayment may be deferred for up to one year. The program is intended for businesses that promote: * major renewable energy production projects; * the manufacture of clean energy products; * advanced manufacturing of clean energy components; * retooling to provide component parts and other critical needs for a successful, totally integrated supply chain; * improving industrial users’ competitiveness through energy efficiency and renewable energy deployment. The definitions of eligible renewable energy and energy efficiency related technologies are not specified, but the program website gives several examples possible projects. Project eligibility is limited to those that create or retain jobs through clean energy advanced manufacturing, clean energy supply chain development, and through reduction in the use of fossil fuels at industrial facilities, including the integration of renewable energy into industrial processes. Funds specifically may not be used for construction or building repairs; to purchase buildings or land; or to perform research, development, and demonstration activities for non-commercial technologies. Projects that have already obtained other necessary financing pieces; environmental and zoning permits; and other clearances will be given a high priority under this program. Money to fund this program comes from State Energy Program funds under the federal American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009, otherwise known as the federal stimulus bill. Currently, $28 million in funding is available through this program with up to $5 million set aside for applications in state's cheese industry. The program is eventually expected to have a total budget of $55 million. Please consult the program website for further details or contact the appropriate [http://commerce.wi.gov/BD/BD-AreaDevManagers.html Commerce Area Development Manager] to discuss your project.
    elopment Manager] to discuss your project.  +
  • ''''' Due to the current budgetary constra
    ''''' Due to the current budgetary constraints of the District of Columbia government, program funding has been rescinded for fiscal year 2011. August 15, 2010 was the final day which programs were operational. This does not affect Pepco customers in Maryland. '''''<br> PEPCO offers appliance and lighting rebates to its residential DC customers who purchase select energy efficient products. Rebates are available on CFL light bulbs, refrigerators, room a/c units, and water heaters. Refrigerators and a/c units must be Energy Star qualified and water heaters must have an Efficiency Factor of at least 0.93 to receive rebate. Rebates are available to Pepco DC customers on qualifying purchases at any retail store after September 15, 2009. Rebate applications must include account number, original sales receipt, and must be received within 60 days of purchase. See the program website listed above to view the [http://www.pepco.com/_res/documents/MD%20Rebate%20Application%209_23_09%20FINAL.pdf Appliance Rebate Application] or a list of [http://homeenergysavings.pepco.com/dc/lighting/stores participating CFL retailers.]
    hting/stores participating CFL retailers.]  +
  • ''''' Note: Due to possible funding constr
    ''''' Note: Due to possible funding constraints, all rebate applications must be pre-approved before purchasing any equipment.''''' Groton Utilities, a municipal utility, offers incentives for commercial and industrial customers to install energy-efficient equipment in eligible facilities through several efficiency programs described in detail on the web site above. Rebates for: *efficient lighting retrofits and vending machine controls (based on number of kilowatt-hours (kWh) saved) *new energy-efficient lighting *high-efficiency motors (based on the number, type, and efficiency rating of units installed) *HVAC equipment (based on the system size and efficiency) In some cases the rebate is limited to 50% of the total project cost. Applications are available on the utility's web site, and in some cases an application must be submitted for approval before construction begins. Groton Utilities may perform a post-installation inspection at the utility's discretion. Groton Utilities also offers cash incentives for customers who participate in the utility's [http://www.grotonutilities.com/conserv.asp?l=1 Demand Response Program]. This voluntary program requires customers to reduce electricity consumption when the electric system is severely constrained and the price of electricity is high.
    ined and the price of electricity is high.  +
  • ''''' Note: Rates listed below are for far
    ''''' Note: Rates listed below are for farmers who signed up for the program by January 1, 2011. Information regarding future funding opportunities will be posted here when it becomes available. ''''' The Missouri Agricultural and Small Business Development Authority (MASBDA) is now offering incentives to livestock farmers in the form of assistance with loans for energy efficiency. The "Missouri Agricultural Energy Saving Team - a Revolutionary Opportunity," or MAESTRO, offers assistance in the form of Interest Buy Downs, Cash Down Payments, a Loan Loss Reserve, and Audit Rebates. <b>Implementation Grant</b>: MASBDA will provide up to $12,000 of cost-share, not to exceed 75% of the total retrofit project. A farmer can use up to $3,000 of that amount for home upgrades. Installed retrofits must result in at least 15% energy savings. <b>Interest Buy Down</b>: MASBDA will pay for a portion of the interest due on loans for energy efficiency technologies. The loan interest rate will be reduced to 3%. The lender receives the difference in interest payments in one lump sum. For example, if the loan was $25,000 at a 6.5% interest rate for 5 years, with monthly payments, the interest would have been $4,349.26. The same loan at 3% interest would be $1,953.02 in interest. Therefore, the lender would receive a payment of $2,386.24 ($4,349.26-$1,953.02). <b>Cash Down Payment</b>: Farmers can also choose a Cash Down Payment. The payment is calculated as above, but instead of the lender receiving the payment, the farmer receives the payment. If the farmer chooses this option, the loan interest rate remains the same instead of decreasing to 3%. <b>Loan Loss Reserve</b>: MASBDA has established a dedicated fund for the purpose of guaranteeing payments on defaulted loans. When farmers apply for a loan from a lender, the farmer and lender submit an application to the MASBDA for the Loan Loss Reserve. If approved, the program guarantees to the lender that if the farmer defaults on the loan, MASBDA will pay up to 75% of the loan. <b>Audit Rebates</b>: MASBDA is offering rebates of up to $125 for a farm audit and $125 for a home audit. Farmers can only qualify for the rebate if one or more of the audit recommendations are implemented and the energy savings realized are at least 15%. To begin the application process for one of the above options, interested livestock farmers must first sign up for a comprehensive farm audit. The audit will identify efficiency technologies that should be installed at the farm or farm house. Only these technologies are eligible for the Interest Buy Down, Cash Down Payment, or Loan Loss Reserve programs. To participate in the program, interested farmers should contact EnSave at 1-800-732-1399 to set up an initial assessment. In order to qualify for the MAESTRO program, applicants must be legal Missouri residents that operate animal agricultural farmers. Loans must be from a state or national bank, farm credit system, bank for cooperatives, federal or state chartered savings and loan association, federal or state building and loan association or a small business investment company. All energy efficiency technology must be installed and operational by November 30, 2012. <i>This program is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) [http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/betterbuildings/neighborhoods/ BetterBuildings Program]. The DOE has awarded over $500 million in federal funds to more than 40 states, local governments, and organizations to administer local programs targeting a variety of building types. Combined, these local programs are expected to improve the efficiency of more than 170,000 buildings through 2013 and save up to $65 million in energy costs annually.</i>
    illion in energy costs annually.</i>  +
  • ''''' Note: THIS PROGRAM HAS EXPIRED FOR 2
    ''''' Note: THIS PROGRAM HAS EXPIRED FOR 2008 AND NOT YET REOPENED FOR 2009''''' This program is offered to Data Centers in the Oncor service area to encourage energy efficiency upgrades. It provides incentive dollars for installing energy efficient measures in data center facilities, including virtualization solutions and high efficiency UPS and HVAC system upgrades (and others - see program materials). Demand reduction measures are eligible for an incentive of $150/kW and energy usage reductions may receive an incentive of $0.0175/kWh. There are no project size limits specified for this program. This program also provides funds to offset the cost of completing assessments needed to establish which projects may provide the largest energy savings potential. Assessment assistance levels depend on project size and completion date. The details are listed in the program incentive schedule above. Projects must be completed by November 30, 2008 in order to be eligible for any of the incentives listed above. CLEAResult Consulting is the implementing contractor for Oncor Electric Delivery's Data Center Energy Management Program in Texas.
    Center Energy Management Program in Texas.  +
  • ''''''''Note: The SunSense Program will re
    ''''''''Note: The SunSense Program will resume for 2015 and begin accepting applications on January 14, 2015 at 1:30 PM. '''On November 25th. 2014 the Florida PSC voted to end a solar pilot program at the end of 2015 that requires independently owned utilities to offer solar rebates. This program will not be offered after 2015.''''''''''' Progress Energy Florida (PEF) has allocated $1.9 million per year towards residential photovoltaic (PV) incentives. PEF will accept applications annually from residential customers both wishing to install a PV system and qualifying for a rebate. Reservations for a rebate will be issued on a first-come basis, however a reservation does not guarantee that a rebate will be awarded, only that funding for a rebate is available should the system be installed, meet all requirements and pass inspection. To qualify for the residential PV program, an applicant must be a Progress Energy Florida (PEF) customer and a homeowner. The applicant must also be the account holder, use the home as a primary residence and own the solar PV system  installed on the home. Other requirements include: * PEF must approve application and conduct an on-site Home Energy Check (HEC) prior to PV system installation * The proposed PV system must be certified and approved by the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) * Systems must be installed by a licensed contractor, meet electric and safety standards * Participating customers’ systems must be directly connected to the PEF system by following the [https://www.progress-energy.com/company/electricity-system/interconnect/florida/index.page? DEF interconnection procedures]. Customers with PV systems ranging in size from 2 kW DC to 10 kW DC are eligible to participate and may earn an incentive based on the kW value. Installations of systems system larger than 10 kW are permissible, but the incentive is limited to a maximum of $20,000 per residence. After installation, the PV system must be capable of producing at least 1,000 kWh per kW DC each year. Once the limit of $1.9 million in rebates is achieved, the application process will be closed. The process will be re-opened again October 1 of each year for systems to be installed the following calendar year. For an application checklist, further requirements and additional resources regarding the rebate please visit the[https://www.progress-energy.com/florida/home/save-energy-money/energy-efficiency-improvements/sunsense/solar-pv.page? DEF Solar PV website].
    ense/solar-pv.page? DEF Solar PV website].  +
  • '''''*This program has been deactivated an
    '''''*This program has been deactivated and is now part of the Efficiency United entry''''' Alpena Power Company offers rebates, assistance and other incentives through the Efficiency United program, which is a partnership between 11 Michigan utilities. The program is intended to provide assistance and incentives to customers who install or employ energy efficient equipment or measures which save money and energy at home and at work. The Energy Star Appliance Rebate Program is one part of this program. Alpena offers the Residential HVAC Program, which provides incentives to residential customers for installing energy efficient central air conditioning units and ECM blower motors. Incentives will be provided to the home owner and will be based on fulfilling energy efficiency standards. See Efficiency United web site listed above for further information regarding program guidelines and incentives.
    garding program guidelines and incentives.  +
  • '''''*This program has been deactivated an
    '''''*This program has been deactivated and is now part of the Efficiency United entry''''' The Commercial and Industrial Rebate Program offers several options to business customers in the Alpena service area. The programs incent customers to save energy and money through the use of energy efficient technologies. The Prescriptive Commercial and Industrial Program offers incentives for various efficient hvac measures, motors, fans, pumps, drives, water heaters, refrigeration measures, cooking equipment, lighting fixtures, systems and controls. Applications must have complete information and be submitted with an invoice itemizing the new equipment purchased and the manufacturer specification sheets. Invoice must indicate date of purchase, size, type, make, model and project cost. To qualify lighting must be used a minimum of 1,800 hours per year. Purchased and installed equipment must not receive an incentive larger than $10,000. Customers must receive written approval before installation. The Commercial and Industrial (C&I) Custom Program provides custom incentives to C&I customers for the installation of energy-efficient equipment and controls. The custom program allows measures and systems to be installed for situations unique to that customer's application or process. Incentives are offered on a per kW and kWh schedule, based on projected savings. Applicants must receive approval prior to beginning project. Complete form and attach invoice of all project costs. Contact Alpena Power Company for more information or an application. Small businesses are also available for the Residential and Small Business Energy Star Program. This program provides rebates for the purchase of efficient CFL bulbs ($1) and energy star clothes washers ($50). Replacement washers must be CEE Tier 2 or 3 to qualify. View web site listed above for more program information.
    listed above for more program information.  +
  • '''''*This record is for information purpo
    '''''*This record is for information purposes only.* TSI will no longer accept applications for Solar Installation Grants. The program received more applications than ARRA allocations could support. TSI will re-open the program should additional funds become available.''''' The Tennessee Solar Institute is a collaboration between the University of Tennessee and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, established in 2009. Using funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), the Solar Institute began offering grants* for solar installations in June 2010. Only business entities (including commercial, industrial and agricultural businesses) and non-profit organizations (with 501c3 designation) are eligible to apply. Systems owned by third parties are eligible for funding. Pre-approval is required for all projects. All projects must be built by December 31, 2011, and must follow ARRA reporting requirements in order to receiving funding. Awards totaling half of the $9 million allocated for this initiative have been announced as of August 2010. A full technical review along with the detailed application is required to receive the solar installation incentive. *'' These grants are available on a first-come, first-served basis as long as the project complies with the program guidelines and meets all eligibility requirements and funding is available. In a typical "grant" program, there is some sort of competition and/or ranking of qualified applicants. This program resembles a rebate program rather than a grant program.''
    ate program rather than a grant program.''  +
  • '''''2013 Update: Phase II of the Qualifyi
    '''''2013 Update: Phase II of the Qualifying Advanced Energy Project is open. Required concept papers are due to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by April 9, 2013. The U.S. DOE will review concept papers and select which companies will be allowed to submit a full application. Applications are due July 23, 2013. Concept papers and applications must follow guidelines and are to be submitted electronically via the EERE eXCHANGE web site (see web link above).'''''<br> <br> ''The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009'' established an investment tax credit to encourage the development of a U.S.-based renewable energy manufacturing sector. The investment tax credit is equal to 30% of the qualified investment required for an advanced energy project that establishes, re-equips or expands a manufacturing facility that produces any of the following: * Equipment and/or technologies used to produced energy from the sun, wind, geothermal or "other" renewable resources * Fuel cells, microturbines or energy-storage systems for use with electric or hybrid-electric motor vehicles * Equipment used to refine or blend renewable fuels * Equipment and/or technologies to produce energy-conservation technologies (including energy-conserving lighting technologies and smart grid technologies)* Qualified investments generally include personal tangible property that is depreciable and required for the production process. Other tangible property may be considered a qualified investment only if it is an essential part of the facility, excluding buildings and structural components.<br> <br> Based on recommendations from the U.S. DOE, the U.S. Treasury Department (Treasury) will issue certifications for qualified investments eligible for credits to qualifying advanced energy project sponsors. After certification is granted, the taxpayer has one year to provide additional evidence that the requirements of the certification have been met and three years to put the project in service. There are provisions for credit recapture for non-compliance. There is a total of $150 million available for this phase of the Advanced Energy Manufacturing Tax Credit program.<br> <br> In determining which projects to certify, the U.S. DOE and Treasury must consider those which most likely will be commercially viable, provide the greatest domestic job creation, provide the greatest net reduction of air pollution and/or greenhouse gases, have great potential for technological innovation and commercial deployment, have the lowest levelized cost of generated (or stored) energy ''or'' the lowest levelized cost of reduction in energy consumption or greenhouse gas emissions, ''and'' have the shortest project time.<br> <br> Any taxpayer receiving this credit may '''not '''also receive the federal [http://www.dsireusa.org/library/includes/incentive2.cfm?Incentive_Code=US02F&State=federal¤tpageid=1&ee=1&re=1 business energy investment tax credit]. <br> ''* This credit could be expanded in the future to include other energy technologies that reduce greenhouse gas emissions, as determined by the U.S. Treasury Department.''
    ermined by the U.S. Treasury Department.''  +
  • '''''A Delaware SREC Pilot Procurement Pro
    '''''A Delaware SREC Pilot Procurement Program was approved in November of 2011 by the Delaware Public Service Commission. The program is expected to begin in April 2012, the details of the pilot program can be found [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=DE24F&re=1&ee=1 here].''''' In 2005, Senate Bill 74 established a [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=DE06R&re=1&ee=1 renewables portfolio standard (RPS)] requiring Delaware retail electricity suppliers to purchase 10% of the electricity sold in the state from renewable sources by 2019. [http://legis.delaware.gov/LIS/LIS144.NSF/vwLegislation/SB+19?Opendocument Senate Bill 19 of 2007] increased the RPS target to 20%, and added a requirement that a portion of the requirement be met with solar photovoltaic (PV) resources. The standard was expanded again to 25% renewables and 3.5% photovoltaics by 2026 by [http://delcode.delaware.gov/sessionlaws/ga145/chp451.shtml S.S. 1 for S.B. 119] enacted in July 2010. The PV target began at 0.011% for the June 2008 - May 2009 compliance year (CY 2009) and accelerates slowly over time towards an ultimate target of 3.5% for compliance year 2025-2026. The RPS applies to the state's investor-owned utilities, retail electricity suppliers, municipal utilities, and rural electric cooperatives. Municipal utilities and rural electric cooperatives are allowed to opt out of the RPS requirements if they establish a comparable RPS program for their own ratepayers by 2013, and establish a green energy fund. Under Delaware law, a solar renewable energy credit (SREC), is equivalent to one megawatt-hour (MWh) of retail electricity sales in the state that is derived from a qualifying PV resource. Electricity suppliers must purchase SRECs in order to meet their compliance obligations under the law, or pay a Solar Alternative Compliance Payment (SACP) for any shortfalls in SREC purchases. The SACP operates as a ceiling on the price that a supplier would pay for SRECs used for compliance with the Delaware RPS. In general, the SACP is initially set at $400 per MWh, but increases to $450 per MWh if the electricity supplier has opted for the ACP in any previous year, and then increases to $500 with any subsequent uses. The Delaware Energy Office has the authority to review and adjust the ACP and SACP given certain market conditions. As of August 2012, sales of Delaware-sourced SRECs tracked on the [http://www.pjm-eis.com/ PJM-EIS Generation Attributes Tracking System (GATS)] averaged $189 per MWh, down from $260 MWh average for June 2010-August 2011. Under this system SRECs represent a potentially significant source of revenue for owners of qualifying PV facilities with a value determined by demand in the trading market. In Delaware, net metering customers retain ownership of SRECs (or RECs) for energy produced and consumed by the customer. A generator remains eligible to generate SRECs for as long as the facility remains certified as an eligible generator. SRECs submitted for compliance with the RPS must have been created no more than three years prior to the year in which they are used for compliance. In other words, an SREC may generally be used for compliance by an obligated electricity supplier for the compliance year during which it was generated or the two subsequent compliance years.* An obligated entity may use an SREC to comply with the PV carve-out of the RPS or with the general renewables requirement. For the purposes of compliance, an SREC generated by a customer-sited facility physically located within Delaware and installed on or before December 31, 2014 is granted a 300% multiplier if used to fulfill the general renewables requirement. Thus, one SREC equals one SREC for the PV carve-out, but three RECs used to fulfill the general renewables requirement.** In order to begin producing Delaware-eligible SRECs, generators must be certified by the Delaware Public Service Commission (PSC) as an eligible generator. In order to qualify as an eligible generator, customer-sited facilities (i.e., behind the meter facilities) must be physically located within the state of Delaware. Generation from other facilities qualifies for Delaware's standard if the generator is located within the PJM footprint, or if the electricity is imported into the PJM and tracked through the PJM Market Settlement System. When the generator has been issued a certification number, they may create an account with the PJM-EIS Generation Attribute Tracking System (GATS). The GATS is used to track the generation and transfer of SRECs from an eligible facility. SRECs are created in the GATS based on energy production meter readings uploaded to the system by the generator. Unlike some other states, Delaware does not allow small generators to use engineering estimates of energy production as the basis for creating SRECs. The passage of [http://www.legis.delaware.gov/LIS/lis146.nsf/vwLegislation/SB+124/$file/legis.html?open S. B. 124] in July of 2011 amended the Delaware RPS to allow energy output from a Qualified Fuel Cell Provider Project in fulfilling a portion of the requirements under the RPS Act. A qualified fuel cell provider project is a fuel cell power generation project located in Delaware owned and/or operated by a Qualified Fuel Cell Provider. A qualified provider is defined in S.B. 124 as a commercial operation which manufactures fuel cells capable of being run on renewable fuels and is designated as an economic development opportunity by the Delaware Economic Development Office and the DNREC. The energy produced by such projects shall fulfill the commission-regulated electric company's state-mandated REC and SREC requirements. The fulfillment of the equivalent of 1 REC is equal to each MWh of energy. These projects will fulfill no more than 30% of the SREC requirements at a ratio of 6 MWh of RECs per 1MWh of SRECs. ''* The Delaware Sustainable Energy Utility (SEU) is required to act as a REC aggregator for customer-sited renewable energy facilities. The three-year REC lifetime is "tolled", or suspended, during any period in which a REC is held by the SEU. ** Delaware also has allows a small credit bonus of 10% for solar electricity produced by solar (or wind) installations for which at least 50% of the equipment (on the basis of cost) is manufactured in Delaware, or for which 75% of the labor and construction is performed by an in-state workforce.''
    n is performed by an in-state workforce.''  +
  • '''''A Delaware SREC Pilot Procurement Pro
    '''''A Delaware SREC Pilot Procurement Program was approved in November of 2011 by the Delaware Public Service Commission. The details of the pilot program can be found''''' '''''[http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=DE24F&re=1&ee=1 here].''''' In 2005, Senate Bill 74 established a [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=DE06R&re=1&ee=1 renewables portfolio standard (RPS)] requiring Delaware retail electricity suppliers to purchase 10% of the electricity sold in the state from renewable sources by 2019. [http://legis.delaware.gov/LIS/LIS144.NSF/vwLegislation/SB+19?Opendocument Senate Bill 19 of 2007] increased the RPS target to 20%, and added a requirement that a portion of the requirement be met with solar photovoltaic (PV) resources. The standard was expanded again to 25% renewables and 3.5% photovoltaics by 2026 by [http://delcode.delaware.gov/sessionlaws/ga145/chp451.shtml S.S. 1 for S.B. 119] enacted in July 2010. The PV target began at 0.011% for the June 2008 - May 2009 compliance year (CY 2009) and accelerates slowly over time towards an ultimate target of 3.5% for compliance year 2025-2026. The RPS applies to the state's investor-owned utilities, retail electricity suppliers, municipal utilities, and rural electric cooperatives. Municipal utilities and rural electric cooperatives are allowed to opt out of the RPS requirements if they establish a comparable RPS program for their own ratepayers by 2013, and establish a green energy fund.<br> <br> Under Delaware law, a solar renewable energy credit (SREC), is equivalent to one megawatt-hour (MWh) of retail electricity sales in the state that is derived from a qualifying PV resource. Electricity suppliers must purchase SRECs in order to meet their compliance obligations under the law, or pay a Solar Alternative Compliance Payment (SACP) for any shortfalls in SREC purchases. The SACP operates as a ceiling on the price that a supplier would pay for SRECs used for compliance with the Delaware RPS. In general, the SACP is initially set at $400 per MWh, but increases to $450 per MWh if the electricity supplier has opted for the ACP in any previous year, and then increases to $500 for subsequent years. The Delaware Energy Office has the authority to review and adjust the ACP and SACP given certain market conditions. As of October 2014, sales of Delaware-sourced SRECs tracked on the [http://www.srectrade.com/ SRECTrade] averaged $55 per MWh. <br> <br> Under this system SRECs represent a potentially significant source of revenue for owners of qualifying PV facilities with a value determined by demand in the trading market. In Delaware, net metering customers retain ownership of SRECs (or RECs) for energy produced and consumed by the customer. A generator remains eligible to generate SRECs for as long as the facility remains certified as an eligible generator. SRECs submitted for compliance with the RPS must have been created no more than three years prior to the year in which they are used for compliance. In other words, an SREC may generally be used for compliance by an obligated electricity supplier for the compliance year during which it was generated or the two subsequent compliance years.* An obligated entity may use an SREC to comply with the PV carve-out of the RPS or with the general renewables requirement. For the purposes of compliance, an SREC generated by a customer-sited facility physically located within Delaware and installed on or before December 31, 2014 is granted a 300% multiplier if used to fulfill the general renewables requirement. Thus, one SREC equals one SREC for the PV carve-out, but three RECs used to fulfill the general renewables requirement.*<br> <br> In order to begin producing Delaware-eligible SRECs, generators must be certified by the Delaware Public Service Commission (PSC) as an eligible generator. In order to qualify as an eligible generator, customer-sited facilities (i.e., behind the meter facilities) must be physically located within the state of Delaware. Generation from other facilities qualifies for Delaware's standard if the generator is located within the PJM footprint, or if the electricity is imported into the PJM and tracked through the PJM Market Settlement System. When the generator has been issued a certification number, they may create an account with the PJM-EIS Generation Attribute Tracking System (GATS). The GATS is used to track the generation and transfer of SRECs from an eligible facility. SRECs are created in the GATS based on energy production meter readings uploaded to the system by the generator. Unlike some other states, Delaware does not allow small generators to use engineering estimates of energy production as the basis for creating SRECs. <br> The passage of [http://www.legis.delaware.gov/LIS/lis146.nsf/vwLegislation/SB+124/$file/legis.html?open S. B. 124 ]in July of 2011 amended the Delaware RPS to allow energy output from a Qualified Fuel Cell Provider Project in fulfilling a portion of the requirements under the RPS Act. A qualified fuel cell provider project is a fuel cell power generation project located in Delaware owned and/or operated by a Qualified Fuel Cell Provider. A qualified provider is defined in S.B. 124 as a commercial operation which manufactures fuel cells capable of being run on renewable fuels and is designated as an economic development opportunity by the Delaware Economic Development Office and the DNREC. The energy produced by such projects shall fulfill the commission-regulated electric company's state-mandated REC and SREC requirements. The fulfillment of the equivalent of 1 REC is equal to each MWh of energy. These projects will fulfill no more than 30% of the SREC requirements at a ratio of 6 MWh of RECs per 1MWh of SRECs.<br> <br> ''* The Delaware Sustainable Energy Utility (SEU) is required to act as a REC aggregator for customer-sited renewable energy facilities. The three-year REC lifetime is "tolled", or suspended, during any period in which a REC is held by the SEU.<br> <br> ** Delaware also has allows a small credit bonus of 10% for solar electricity produced by solar (or wind) installations for which at least 50% of the equipment (on the basis of cost) is manufactured in Delaware, or for which 75% of the labor and construction is performed by an in-state workforce.''
    n is performed by an in-state workforce.''  +
  • '''''Applications are now being considered
    '''''Applications are now being considered on a case-by-case basis. School districts interested in applying for loans should contact Ron Graham, Executive Director of the Energy Efficient Schools Initiative, directly.''''' The Energy Efficient Schools Initiative (EESI) was created in May 2008 to provide [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=TN56F&re=1&ee=1 grants] and loans to Tennessee school systems for capital outlay projects that meet energy efficient design and technology guidelines for school facilities. All school systems in Tennessee are eligible to apply. Possible projects include lighting upgrades, HVAC upgrades, and other projects that meet pre-determined energy use objectives. The maximum loan is $66/student (at the district level). School districts that already executed loans totaling less than $1 million cannot refinance existing loans, but they can apply for an additional loan as long as the combined total does not exceed $1 million. In addition, the Technical Advisory Committee will review $30 million worth of loans, which have a $5 million cap per school district. The committee will submit its choices to the EESI Council. State government appropriated the original funding ($90 million) with a onetime transfer from the Lottery for Education Account reserve and Lottery for Education special reserve account for K-12 capital outlay. Additional money to the fund comes from interest earnings and other funds secured by the Energy Efficient Schools Council. The Council is part of the Department of Education.
    il is part of the Department of Education.  +
  • '''''Applications for grants under the 201
    '''''Applications for grants under the 2011 solicitation were due by 2:00 PM on April 4, 2011.''''' The North Carolina Green Business Fund, created in 2007, provides funding to North Carolina small and mid-size businesses, nonprofit organizations, state agencies and local governments to encourage the development and commercialization of "promising" renewable energy and green building technologies. Grants of up to $500,000 are available for the development of commercial innovations and applications in the biofuels industry, sustainable building practices and private sector investment in renewable energy technologies. North Carolina-based businesses and nonprofits with fewer than 100 employees, as well as state and local governmental entities, are generally eligible. Grants in the green building sector may be awarded for innovation in areas of installation, certification or distribution of green building materials; energy audits; workforce development; and marketing and sales. For private sector investment in clean technologies, grants may target renewable energy deployment, biomass energy projects, waste reclamation for energy, implementation of energy efficiency technologies and clean distributed generation infrastructure improvements. Grants are also available for the development, production and distribution of biofuels in North Carolina. The 2011 solicitation had a total of $3 million. This solicitation is now closed.
    million. This solicitation is now closed.  +
  • '''''As of 12/7/2010, funding for this pro
    '''''As of 12/7/2010, funding for this program is fully reserved. Applications received after this date will be placed on a waiting list in case additional funding becomes available.''''' The Minnesota Small Wind Turbine Rebate program provides financial support to commercial businesses that install Small Wind Turbine systems. Here, Small Wind Turbine systems are those with rated capacities at or less than thirty five kilowatts (35 kW) at 24.6 miles per hour (mph). Eligibility is determined by nature and size of the business, site designated for installation and equipment selected. The rebate amount is 35% of eligible system and installation costs, up to $ 25,000. Rebates will be awarded on a first-come, first-served basis until all available funds have been reserved. A rebate application must be approved by the Minnesota Office of Energy Security before any equipment is ordered, purchased, or installed. A Rebate Confirmation Form and Rebate Claim Form will be mailed to the applicant upon application approval. Visit the [http://www.state.mn.us/portal/mn/jsp/content.do?id=-536893811&subchannel=null&sc2=null&sc3=null&contentid=536920558&contenttype=EDITORIAL&programid=536917401&agency=Energy Minnesota Small Wind Commercial Rebate webpage] to obtain more further information on rebate application steps '''Participant Eligibility''' Small businesses with 20 or fewer full-time employees are eligible. A facility owned by a non-profit organized under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code is eligible provided that the facility is used for a commercial activity. '''Commercial Site Requirements''' The location for installation must be within the state borders of Minnesota. In addition, the site must register a minimum of 12 mph at wind system hub height. See the [http://www.state.mn.us/portal/mn/jsp/content.do?id=-536893809&subchannel=-536895045&sc2=null&sc3=null&contentid=536919721&contenttype=EDITORIAL&programid=536917287&agency=Energy Minnesota OES Wind Speed Verification Tool] in order to determine your location’s average annual wind speed: Wind Speed Verification Tool '''Qualifying Installation and Technology''' The wind system must have a minimum average wind speed of 12.0 mph at hub height. Eligible wind system models are listed on the MN OES Commercial Small Wind Rebate website. The small wind system must be installed by a bonded and/or licensed contractor, as applicable to state and local ruling. The installation must be finished within 180 days of rebate application approval.
    n 180 days of rebate application approval.  +
  • '''''As of 12/7/2010, funding for this pro
    '''''As of 12/7/2010, funding for this program is fully reserved. Applications received after 12/7/2010 will be placed on a waiting list in case funding becomes available.''''' The Minnesota Office of Energy Security (OES) is offering rebates to offset the up-front cost of installing small wind energy generation devices at existing primary residences in Minnesota. Systems are limited to a maximum rated capacity of 35 kilowatts (kW) at a wind speed of 24.6 mph. Qualifying systems are eligible for a rebate of 35% of installed system costs up to a maximum rebate of $10,000 and incentive amounts may not exceed the total cost of the system minus the cost of any federal, utility, or other incentives. Although the program opened in May 2010, systems installed on or after July 1, 2009 that meet the program requirements are eligible for incentives. For systems beginning construction after April 30, 2010, participants must submit an application to reserve funding prior to installing the system. The system must be installed within 180 days of receiving a reservation confirmation in order to qualify for a rebate. Both grid-connected and off-grid systems are eligible for incentives. However, system eligibility is limited to a list of specific wind turbine models contained in the program application and a variety of additional equipment, installation, and warranty requirements apply to systems and major components. Notably, applicants must demonstrate that the site wind resource is sufficient for wind generation (minimum 12 mph at hub height) and tower heights must be at least 80 feet unless the applicant can demonstrate that the minimum wind speed is available at a lower height. This requirement can be met using the Minnesota Wind Verification Tool on the program web site, or through a site assessment report from a Midwest Renewable Energy Association (MREA) certified site assessor. The OES also suggests that prospective participants explore options for improving the energy efficiency of their home prior to installing a wind energy system. A total of $500,000 is available under this program, funded from State Energy Program (SEP) funds under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Applications will be accepted on a first-come, first-served basis until available funding is exhausted. Please see the program web site and rebate application for additional details.
    rebate application for additional details.  +
  • '''''As of March 24, 2010, the reservation
    '''''As of March 24, 2010, the reservation period for the second round of funding is closed. Additional rounds of funding are not anticipated.''''' The Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals, and Energy (DMME) is utilizing up to $15 million over three years to provide rebates on solar thermal heating, solar photovoltaic (PV) installations (up to 10 kW for residential), and for small wind systems (up to 10 kW for residential). The funding was made available from the State Energy Program allocation from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The two-step application includes a rebate reservation request. This request is made via the online submission portal found at the DMME's website. Rebate recipients are subject to audits and certification. Applicants will be required to submit documentation of work in addition to the completed reservation form and rebate application. In general, all applicants are required to comply with local, state and federal building, fire and safety codes and are responsible for obtaining building permits (as required) or other permits/documentation that may be required (in the case of historical structures). Interested applicants must read through the [http://www.dmme.virginia.gov/DE/ARRA-Public/RenewableEnergyRebateTerms.pdf Terms and Conditions] carefully, as there are many additional requirements and stipulations to consider. ''*CEC-AC is a system's capacity rating based on PVUSA Test Conditions (PTC) and inverter efficiency.''
    onditions (PTC) and inverter efficiency.''  +
  • '''''As of March 24, 2010, the reservation
    '''''As of March 24, 2010, the reservation period for the second round of funding is closed. Additional rounds of funding are not anticipated.''''' The Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals, and Energy (DMME) is utilizing up to $15 million over three years to provide rebates on solar thermal heating, solar photovoltaic (PV) installations and small wind systems. The funding was made available from the State Energy Program allocation from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The two-step application includes a rebate reservation request. This request is made via the online submission portal found at the DMME's website. Rebate recipients are subject to audits and certification. Applicants will be required to submit documentation of work in addition to the completed reservation form and rebate application. In general, all applicants are required to comply with local, state and federal building, fire and safety codes and are responsible for obtaining building permits (as required) or other permits/documentation that may be required (in the case of historical structures or in the case that their project will be subject to review under the National Environmental Policy Act). Interested applicants must read through the [http://www.dmme.virginia.gov/DE/ARRA-Public/RenewableEnergyRebateTerms.pdf Terms and Conditions] carefully, as there are many additional requirements and stipulations to consider. ''*CEC-AC is a system's capacity rating based on PVUSA Test Conditions (PTC) and inverter efficiency.''
    onditions (PTC) and inverter efficiency.''  +
  • '''''As of March 26, 2010, the Virginia De
    '''''As of March 26, 2010, the Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals, and Energy is no longer accepting reservations. This program is fully subscribed and the information here is for informational purposes only.''''' The Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals, and Energy (DMME) are providing rebates for a variety of energy efficiency upgrades. In all cases, the energy efficient equipment must replace older, less efficient, in-use equipment. The second round of funding has up to $6.5 million for rebates for residents that invest in energy efficiency improvements, retrofits, or replacement of old inefficient equipment with approved energy efficient equipment in their homes.* For a list of energy efficiency technologies and services eligible for rebates, review DMME's [http://www.dmme.virginia.gov/DE/ARRA-Public/EEMeasuresRequirements.shtml list]. The application is a two-step process. Residents MUST first submit a reservation application to be eligible for a rebate. Equipment purchased on or after June 26, 2009 is eligible. In most cases, applicants will be required to submit a Manufacturer's Certification Statement and in some cases, the contractor will be required to calculate estimated or expected energy savings of the efficiency upgrades. Applicants should read DMME's [http://www.dmme.virginia.gov/DE/ARRA-Public/EEGenTermsConditions.shtml Terms and Conditions] carefully as well as see the Frequently Asked Questions, which provide additional guidance. *''This $6.5 million is the total available to fund both residential and commercial rebates.''
    both residential and commercial rebates.''  +
  • '''''As of March 26, 2010, the Virginia De
    '''''As of March 26, 2010, the Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals, and Energy is no longer accepting reservations. This program is fully subscribed and the information here is for informational purposes only.''''' The Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals, and Energy (DMME) are providing rebates for a variety of energy efficiency upgrades. In all cases, the energy efficient equipment must replace older, less efficient, in-use equipment. The second round of funding has up to $6.5 million for rebates for commercial, agricultural, and "light industrial" businesses that invest in energy efficiency improvements, retrofits, or replacement of old inefficient equipment with approved energy efficient equipment in their businesses. For a list of energy efficiency technologies and services eligible for rebates, review DMME's [http://www.dmme.virginia.gov/DE/ARRA-Public/EEMeasuresRequirements.shtml list]. The application is a two-step process. Businesses MUST first submit a reservation application to be eligible for a rebate. Equipment purchased on or after June 26, 2009 is eligible. In most cases, applicants will be required to submit a Manufacturer's Certification Statement and in some cases, the contractor will be required to calculate estimated or expected energy savings of the efficiency upgrades. Applicants should read DMME's [http://www.dmme.virginia.gov/DE/ARRA-Public/EEGenTermsConditions.shtml Terms and Conditions] carefully as well as see the Frequently Asked Questions, which provide additional guidance.
    stions, which provide additional guidance.  +
  • '''''As of October 23, 2008, this program
    '''''As of October 23, 2008, this program is suspended until further notice. More details will be provided on the program website as they become available.''''' Arizona Public Service (APS), an investor-owned utility, has partnered with the Electric and Gas Industries Association (EGIA) and participating contractors to help facilitate unsecured financing through the GEOSmart® Sustainable Financing Solutions program. Under this program, APS customers may receive a loan of up to $50,000, with interest rates as low as 7.99%, for a solar-energy system. The loan may be combined with the APS [http://www.dsireusa.org/library/includes/incentive2.cfm?Incentive_Code=AZ04F&state=AZ&CurrentPageID=1&RE=1&EE=1 Renewable Incentive Program]. Customers can choose from three basic financing plans; more details are available on the program web site. At this time, loans may be used to install photovoltaic (PV) systems and solar water heaters. Eventually, APS plans to provide financing for solar space heating and small wind systems as well. Note that other financing or lease options may also be available from installers or other financial institutions.
    nstallers or other financial institutions.  +
  • '''''As part of Ohio’s Tax Reform personal
    '''''As part of Ohio’s Tax Reform personal property tax will be phased-out by 2009 and corporate franchise tax will be phased-out by 2010 for most taxpayers.''''' Ohio may provide an exemption for certain property from real and personal property taxation,* state sales and use taxes, and the state's corporate franchise tax where applicable. The exemption applies to property used in energy conversion, thermal-efficiency improvements and the conversion of solid waste to energy. Generally, "energy conversion" refers to the replacement of fossil-fuel resources with alternative fuels or technologies; "thermal efficiency improvements" refers to the recovery of waste heat or steam produced in any commercial or industrial processes; and "solid waste conversion" refers to the use of waste to produce energy and the utilization of such energy. Eligible technologies may include solar-thermal systems, photovoltaic systems, wind, biomass, landfill gas and waste-recovery systems. Upon receipt of certification from the tax commissioner, such property is exempt from Ohio's sales and use tax. In addition, such property is not considered to be an improvement on the land for purposes of real property taxation or as 'used in business' for purposes of personal property taxation.* Such property is also not considered in the assessment of Ohio's corporate franchise tax. These provisions have been in effect since 1978. Contact the Department of Taxation for more information. The Application for Energy and Solid Waste Energy Conversion and Thermal Efficiency Improvement Facility is found at on the Ohio Department of Taxation [http://dw.ohio.gov/tax/dynamicforms/searchresults.asp website] (form number ECF). *''It should be noted that Ohio's personal property taxes for general business filers have been phased out. See the Department of Taxation [http://tax.ohio.gov/divisions/communications/publications/annual_reports/2008_Annual_Report/property_tax_tangible_personal_property.pdf.pdf fact sheet] on this subject. It should be noted that public utilities are not considered "general business filers" and personal property of public utilities is still taxed. Furthermore, for tax purposes, a business that produces electricity and sells excess electricity to others will be subject to personal property taxes as well. See the Department of Taxation's [http://tax.ohio.gov/divisions/communications/publications/annual_reports/2008_Annual_Report/property_tax_public_utility_property.pdf.pdf fact sheet] for more information. ''
    f.pdf fact sheet] for more information. ''  +
  • '''''As part of Ohio’s Tax Reform, persona
    '''''As part of Ohio’s Tax Reform, personal property tax was phased-out by 2009 and corporate franchise tax was phased-out by 2010 for most taxpayers.''''' Ohio may provide an exemption for certain property from real and personal property taxation*, state sales and use taxes, and the state's corporate franchise tax where applicable. The exemption applies to property used in energy conversion, thermal-efficiency improvements and the conversion of solid waste to energy. Generally, "energy conversion" refers to the replacement of fossil-fuel resources with alternative fuels or technologies; "thermal efficiency improvements" refers to the recovery of waste heat or steam produced in any commercial or industrial processes; and "solid waste conversion" refers to the use of waste to produce energy and the utilization of such energy. Eligible technologies ''may'' include solar-thermal systems, photovoltaic systems, wind, biomass, landfill gas and waste-recovery systems. Upon receipt of certification from the tax commissioner, such property is exempt from Ohio's sales and use tax. In addition, such property is not considered to be an improvement on the land for purposes of real property taxation or as 'used in business' for purposes of personal property taxation.* Such property is also not considered in the assessment of Ohio's corporate franchise tax. These provisions have been in effect since 1978. Contact the Department of Taxation for more information. The Application for Energy and Solid Waste Energy Conversion and Thermal Efficiency Improvement Facility is found at on the Ohio Department of Taxation [http://dw.ohio.gov/tax/dynamicforms/searchresults.asp website] (form number ECF). *''It should be noted that Ohio's personal property taxes for general business filers have been phased out. See the Department of Taxation [http://tax.ohio.gov/divisions/communications/publications/annual_reports/2008_Annual_Report/property_tax_tangible_personal_property.pdf.pdf fact sheet] on this subject. It should be noted that public utilities are not considered "general business filers" and tangible personal property of public utilities is still taxed. Furthermore, for tax purposes, a business that produces electricity and sells excess electricity to others will be subject to personal property taxes as well. See the Department of Taxation's [http://tax.ohio.gov/divisions/communications/publications/annual_reports/2008_Annual_Report/property_tax_public_utility_property.pdf.pdf fact sheet] for more information.''
    df.pdf fact sheet] for more information.''  +
  • '''''Burbank Water and Power (BWP) '''''''
    '''''Burbank Water and Power (BWP) ''''''''''accepted applications for photovoltaic (PV) rebates throughout July 2013. Winners were determined through a lottery on August 12, 2013. ''''''''''Only systems under 30 kW were accepted for this round. ''''''''''See web site above for more information. ''''' Burbank Water and Power (BWP) offers customers either an up-front capacity-based rebate for photovoltaic (PV) systems, or a production-based incentive (PBI) with a maximum payment of $400,000 per year. These incentives decline over time as defined capacity goals are met, eventually declining to zero by the end of 2016. The program may change at any time to address market conditions. Current incentive levels and program details are posted on BWP's [http://www.burbankwaterandpower.com/index.php/incentives-for-all-customers/solar-photovoltaic-power solar web site].<br> <br> The highest rebate, Tier 3, is for schools, non-profits, and affordable housing and is available for only one project per fiscal year. Otherwise, these projects will qualify for the commercial rebate structure. Owners of systems smaller than 30 kW CEC-AC in capacity have the option to receive a one-time up-front payment (EPBB) based on the expected performance determined by BWP's PowerClerk rebate application software. Otherwise, these customers may elect to receive the PBI for five years of monthly payments, based on production. PV systems over 30 kW CEC-AC in size are only eligible to receive the PBI. Incentives for systems over 30 kW, however, have been suspended through August 2013.<br> <br> Beginning January 1, 2010, all PV systems must include a BWP-provided performance meter. PBI customers must pay for the meter and any other meter-related equipment. Also beginning January 1, 2010, customers may use approved leasing as a financing option. In addition, leases less than 20 years are subject to a pro-rated rebate.<br> <br> All customers applying for a BWP solar incentive are required to first conduct an energy-efficiency audit of the building where the solar system would be installed. Newly constructed residential and commercial buildings must achieve at least a 15% reduction in the building’s combined space heating, space cooling and water heating energy compared to Title 24 standards. Lighting is also included in this comparison for commercial buildings. Additionally, each appliance and any equipment provided by the builder must meet Energy Star criteria if this designation is applicable for that appliance or equipment. There is a limit of one solar rebate per customer for the life of the program. Click [http://www.burbankwaterandpower.com/incentives-for-residents/residential-rebates-home-rewards here ]to read about BWP's rebates for residential solar water heaters.
    bates for residential solar water heaters.  +
  • '''''City of North Port loan funds have be
    '''''City of North Port loan funds have been fully committed and are no longer available to residents. Residents of Unincorporated Sarasota County will be put on a waiting list and will be notified when their application will be accepted.''''' Sarasota County offers the Get Energy Smart Retrofit Loan Program to residents of Sarasota County and the City of North Port. In order to qualify for a loan, the total household income of the residents of the home must be less than 140% of median income for Sarasota County. [http://www.ohcd.sarasotagov.com/Get%20Energy%20Smart/Get%20Energy%20Smart%20Income%20Guidelines.pdf Income guidelines] are based on the number of people in the home. A full list of eligibility requirements can be found in the [http://www.ohcd.sarasotagov.com/Get%20Energy%20Smart/guidelines.pdf program guidelines]. Funds can be used for lighting retrofits, Energy Star appliances, insulation, duct repair and sealing, high efficiency air conditioners and heat pumps, solar attic fans, and solar water heaters, and any other items recommended by a home energy auditor. Interested, qualified residents should [http://www.ohcd.sarasotagov.com/Get%20Energy%20Smart/Energy%20Program%20Loan%20Application.pdf apply online]. Once approved, the applicant must obtain three informal bids or estimates from [http://www.scgov.net/retrofit/ParticipatingContractors.asp Participating Contractors], select an auditor, and have an audit performed. Qualified applicants can receive up to a $500 rebate to help with the cost of the audit. Funds are distributed on a first-come, first-served basis.
    buted on a first-come, first-served basis.  +
  • '''''Contact Peoples Gas for information o
    '''''Contact Peoples Gas for information on limited-time bonus incentive offerings. Bonus incentives of $250 - $450 are available for eligible purchases made before May 31, 2013.''''' The Peoples Gas Natural Gas Savings Program offers incentives to encourage customers to make energy-efficient improvements to their homes and apartment buildings. Rebates are available on energy efficient furnaces, boilers, water heaters, controls and insulation. To qualify, gas furnaces, boilers, and water heaters must be installed by professional contractors. Property owners of multifamily units may also participate in this program. A full list of eligible models and insulation and instructions on how to apply for the rebates can be found on the Natural Gas Savings Program web site. Applications must be made no later than 60 days after the equipment purchase date. The Natural Gas Savings Program is funded by customers of Peoples Gas, through a line item on the bill called the Enhanced Efficiency Program. The Program is guided by Peoples Gas, the Citizen's Utility Board, the City of Chicago Department of Environment, the Environmental Law and Policy Center, and the Illinois Attorney General's Office.
    nd the Illinois Attorney General's Office.  +
  • '''''DMME is currently developing criteria
    '''''DMME is currently developing criteria, guidelines, and requirements for loan interest to be charged thereon, the collateralization of loaned<br> funds, the payment of fees and costs incurred by DMME in the making of loans, and such other matters as DMME deems appropriate to ensure the sound conduct of a revolving loan program'''''. The Voluntary Solar Resource Development Fund is a revolving loan fund administered by the Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals and Energy (DMME). The Fund will be fueled primarily by donations from customers of investor-owned electric utilities, other citizens and groups. DMME is will begin issuing loans after July 1, 2012. Eligible projects include the acquisition, installation, and operation of eligible solar equipment at residences, structures operated by nonprofit organizations, or commercial establishments. The Code of Virginia defines the eligible devices as follows: "Photovoltaic device" means a device made in the United States that uses a solar photovoltaic process to generate electricity. "Solar space heating device" means a device made in the United States that, when installed in connection with a structure, uses solar energy for the purpose of heating the interior of the structure, which device moves the sun's heat from one or more collectors to interior areas through the use of a pump and piping or fans and ductwork, and a heat exchanger. "Solar space heating device" does not include a passive solar device. "Solar water heating device" means a device made in the United States that, when installed in connection with a structure, uses solar energy for the purpose of providing hot water for use within the structure.
    ng hot water for use within the structure.  +
  • '''''Due to fund depletion, the program cl
    '''''Due to fund depletion, the program closed to new applications on Friday, April 13, 2012. Purchases made after Thursday, April 12, 2012 will not qualify for a rebate.''''' '''''Note: Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is providing a total of $300 million to U.S. states, U.S. territories and the District of Columbia to establish rebate programs for new energy-efficient appliances that replace existing appliances in homes. Each state and territory has designed its own program. Rebates will be available until the state or territory program's funding is exhausted. Be sure to confirm that rebate funds are still available in your state or territory before making purchasing decisions.''''' Beginning on March 15, 2010, Arkansas's Residential Energy-Efficient Appliance Rebate Program is offering rebates for select Energy Star appliances installed in households in Arkansas. This program is administered by the Arkansas Energy Office. These rebates are available for Energy Star refrigerators, clothes washers, gas condensing water heaters, gas storage water heaters, gas tankless water heaters, and electric heat pump water heaters. These appliances must replace an existing appliance. After purchasing the eligible Energy Star appliances, individuals must apply for the rebate within 30 days. Equipment purchased online is not eligible to receive rebates. Information on the availability of funds can be obtained at the [http://recovery.arkansas.gov/ Arkansas Recovery web site] by calling 1-800-558-2633.
    overy web site] by calling 1-800-558-2633.  +
  • '''''Due to new federal banking and financ
    '''''Due to new federal banking and finance regulations, Coast Electric Power Association can not currently originate loans through this program. A new loan origination format will be available in the near future. Check the program web site above for program status.''''' Coast Electric Power Association (CEPA) offers an Energy Efficiency Finance Program for their residential customers. Mobile homes are not eligible for this loan. The loan can be from $1,000 to $15,000 with a fixed interest rate of two points above the prime rate, with a maximum payback period of 120 months. Loans are available for conservation measures in already existing structures, new construction does not apply. The Loan can cover the installed cost of a complete air-source or geothermal heat pump system, including wiring, duct work, and other associated costs. Certain weatherization measures are also eligible, such as electric water heaters, storm windows and doors, structural insulation, caulking and weather-stripping, and generators. Customers should contact a CEPA Marketing Representative to find out which measures are applicable for their home. For more information, customers can refer to the [http://www.coastepa.com/documents/CAFinanceFactSheet.pdf Comfort Advantage Finance Fact Sheet].
    pdf Comfort Advantage Finance Fact Sheet].  +
  • '''''Federal guidelines have prompted Boul
    '''''Federal guidelines have prompted Boulder County to examine their residential program to ensure it adheres to the new requirements. The ClimateSmart Loan program is on hold for residential loans while County officials review the guidelines. The program is also on hold for commercial projects.''''' Voters in Boulder approved [http://www.bouldercounty.org/newsroom/articlefiles/1304-2008-99%20Resolution%20for%201A%20-%20Clean%20Energy%20Options.pdf Ballot Issue 1A] in November 2008, authorizing Boulder County to issue bonds for the purpose of providing special financing options for renewable energy and energy efficiency improvements to homes in the county. All of the local governments in Boulder County have authorized the city to provide loans to home owners which will then be repaid through a special assessment on their property tax bills. Tax payers can pay two equal half payments due on the last day of February and on June 15th, or the whole payment on April 30th. Either the amount due for the year or the entire loan amount can be paid at these times. After a successful first round of residential funding, Boulder is making plans for the second round of residential funding, and applications are expected to be available in mid-April 2010. Additionally, Boulder launched its first round of commercial funding in January 2010. Property owners can apply for funding for a maximum of 20% of the statutory actual value of the property on which the equipment will be installed, or $50,000 for residential systems and $210,000 for commercial systems, whichever is less. $15,000 is available for income qualified loans, which can be supplemented with open category loans, subject to the $50,000 maximum. The loan can be used to finance a wide variety of efficiency and renewable energy projects on homes in Boulder County. Residential applicants must pay a $75 non-refundable application fee, and obtain written estimates or bids with a "not to exceed" clause prior to applying. Income qualifying loans, for those making up to 115% of area median income, are restricted to primary residences and will receive lower interest rates and annual assessments.
    wer interest rates and annual assessments.  +
  • '''''Fort Pierce Utilities Authority has s
    '''''Fort Pierce Utilities Authority has suspended the Solar Water Heating rebate program until 2013. Contact the utility for more information on these offerings.''''' Fort Pierce Utilities Authority is offering a Solar Water Heating rebate program. Flat rebates of $450 are now available to residential customers toward the installation of new solar water heating units. Systems must be certified by the Florida Solar Energy Center and installed by a licensed Florida contractor to qualify. Rebates are limited to one per household. Rebate applications can be found [http://www.fpua.com/customer_service/index.php here].
    fpua.com/customer_service/index.php here].  +
  • '''''Funding for Block II is fully subscri
    '''''Funding for Block II is fully subscribed. No additional applications are being accepted. Awards were announced in June: see the Energy and Environmental Affairs [http://www.mass.gov/?pageID=eoeeapressrelease&L=3&L0=Home&L1=Energy%2c+Utilities+%26+Clean+Technologies&L2=Renewable+Energy&sid=Eoeea&b=pressrelease&f=100629_ene_commsolar&csid=Eoeea June 29, 2010 Press Release]''''' Commonwealth Solar Stimulus, administered by the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) and funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), provides rebates for the installation of grid-tied photovoltaic (PV) systems at commercial, industrial, institutional and public facilities. Commonwealth Solar Stimulus rebates are available to electricity customers served by Massachusetts investor-owned electric utilities and municipal lighting plant (MLP) utilities. Projects are eligible for rebates for PV projects greater than 10 kilowatts (kW) and less than or equal to 200 kW in capacity. For residential projects and projects 10 kW or smaller, see the [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=MA71F&re=1&ee=1 Commonwealth Solar II] rebate program. Ground mounted systems up to 60 kW are eligible. Rebate amounts are based on the total PV system size per building, regardless of the number of electric meters in use and certain other characteristics of the project. The Commonwealth Solar Stimulus rebate tiers are: * For first 1 to 25 kW: $1.50/watt * For greater than 25 to 100 kW: $1.00/watt * For greater than 100 to 200 kW: $0.50/watt The rebate is available to the system owner, which may or may not be the host customer. Solar renewable-energy credits (SRECs) associated with system generation belong to the system owner and may be sold. MassCEC reserves the right to conduct post-installation inspections of PV projects prior to approval for payments. System installers are responsible for the application process and securing necessary permits. MassCEC has developed an online application system (called PowerClerk) for pre-approved installers. An energy-efficiency audit is generally required. Required documentation generally includes electric utility interconnection approval, an energy-efficiency audit, paid invoices or equivalent, and, if applicable, evidence that automated reporting is functional. All installers must comply with the minimum insurance requirements established by MassCEC. It is recommended, but not required, that installers or their subcontractors obtain or seek to obtain North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners (NABCEP) PV installer certification. There are additional compliance requirements because the funding for this rebate comes from Federal stimulus (ARRA) money. This summary does not capture all of the requirements of the Commonwealth Solar Stimulus program. MassCEC provides program manuals as well as appendices with full program requirements.
    appendices with full program requirements.  +
  • '''''Funding for this program is currently
    '''''Funding for this program is currently exhausted through 2013. The summary below describes incentives as they were previously available. Incentive levels for the next funding round are still unknown. Contact the utility for more information. ''''' City of Gridley is providing rebates of $2.80/W for their customers installing PV systems. Individual rebates are limited to $5,600 per system, and the utility will award a total of $41,700 in rebates per year. Systems must meet all the requirements specified in the program guidelines and interested customers can contact Efficiency Services for more information.
    Efficiency Services for more information.  +
  • '''''IID accepted applications for the 201
    '''''IID accepted applications for the 2013 PV'''''''''' Solutions Program''''' '''''from Jan. 2, 2013 – Jan. 31, 2013. Winners were determined via lottery. The program is now closed for the remainder of 2013, but another funding round is expected in 2014. ''''' Through the PV Solutions Rebate Program, Imperial Irrigation District (IID) provides rebates to its residential and commercial customers who install grid-tied photovoltaic systems. Systems less than 30 kilowatts (kW) can receive an upfront incentive based on the expected performance of the system. For 2013 the expected performance based incentive is $1.95 per watt, but may be reduced based on expected performance. <br> <br> Systems 30 kW or larger will receive a performance based incentive. System owners will receive payments over a 5 year period based on the actual output of their system. The performance based incentive for systems installed in 2013 is $0.18 per kilowatt-hour (kWh). Systems up to 1 megawatt (MW) can participate in the program, but commercial systems over 300 kW and government/non-profit systems over 400 kW will receive a prorated incentive. These payments will be prorated based on the ratio of 300 kW or 400 kW to the size of the site. For example, an 800 kW system owned by a non-profit will receive a payments based on half of the system's output. Incentive payments are capped at $550,000 for the 5-year period ($110,000/year).
    000 for the 5-year period ($110,000/year).  +
  • '''''Illinois Department of Commerce is no
    '''''Illinois Department of Commerce is no longer accepting Program Year 2 applications. Program Year 3 officially begins June 1, 2010. Program materials are available for Program Year 3. This entry includes information about Program Year 3 and for reference, Program Year 2 (below).''''' The Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO) Bureau of Energy and Recycling administers the public sector energy efficiency programs required by the Illinois Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard (EEPS). Standard rebates and grants are available for many lighting, refrigeration, HVAC, and motor efficiency improvements. Custom rebates and grants are available for some measures not covered by the standard rebates. Pre-approval is required for all grants, custom rebates, and some standard rebate applications. The DCEO encourages all applicants to submit pre-approval applications in order to verify project eligibility and reserve funding. The program is available to local, state, and federal governments; public school districts; community colleges; and universities that receive electricity distribution service from Commonwealth Edison (ComEd) or Ameren affiliated utilities (AmerenCILCO, AmerenIP, and AmerenCIPS). This includes customers that purchase energy through an alternative supplier. It should be noted that incentives $50,000 or less are provided in the form of a rebate and incentives of $50,000 or more are provided as grants. '''<u>Program Year 3 (June 1, 2010 to May 31, 2011)</u>''' Standard incentive amounts vary according to equipment type, size, and relative level of energy efficiency. Custom incentives are based on the amount of energy that a given improvement saves annually and are different depending on the type of "public" entity applying. Local government, public schools, and community colleges are eligible for higher incentive amounts: up to $0.12/kilowatt-hour (kWh) or $0.30/kWh for exterior induction, LED lights. Custom measures must have a payback period of between one and seven years. Incentive totals may not exceed 100% of the incremental measure cost or 75% of the project cost. In addition, rebates may not exceed $50,000 and grants will not exceed $300,000. Public universities, state and federal government are eligible for the following incentive amounts: up to $0.09/kilowatt-hour (kWh) or $0.23/kWh for exterior induction, LED lights. Custom measures must have a payback period of between one and seven years. Incentive totals may not exceed 100% of the incremental measure cost or 75% of the project cost. In addition, rebates may not exceed $50,000 and grants will not exceed $300,000. '''NOTE''': There are separate application guidelines and incentive calculation spreadsheets for local government, public school, and community college entities and public universities, state and federal government entities. Projects involving only equipment that qualifies for a standard incentive are not eligible for custom incentives. However, projects that involve a combination of standard measures and measures not eligible for standard incentives are permitted to apply under the custom program. In addition, projects involving standard measures with operating hours substantially greater than the typical operation may apply under the custom program. The following measures are specifically defined as ineligible to receive incentives: * Fuel switching * Projects that replace existing equipment with like equipment * Demand response measures that do not lower overall energy consumption * Measures installed or receiving funding under another utility, DCEO, or Clean Energy Community Foundation incentive program * Custom projects with paybacks longer than the equipment life * Used equipment The program is in its third year (June 1, 2010 to May 31, 2011). The incentive amounts were increased during the third year. Measures installed or costs incurred outside of this time period are not eligible for incentives. Please consult the program website for additional details on program eligibility and application requirements. '''<u>Program Year 2 (June 1, 2009 to May 31, 2010. Funded for Program Year 2 is exhausted.)</u>''' Standard incentive amounts vary according to equipment type, size, and relative level of energy efficiency. Custom incentives are based on the amount of energy that a given improvement saves annually, up to $0.08/kilowatt-hour (kWh). Custom measures must have a payback period of between one and seven years. Incentive totals may not exceed 100% of the incremental measure cost or 75% of the project cost. In addition, rebates may not exceed $50,000 and grants will not exceed $200,000. Over $27 million has supported this incentive during the first two program years ($7.4 million from June 1, 2008 - May 31, 2009, approximately $15 million from June 1, 2009 - May 31, 2010, plus $5 million ARRA stimulus funding from August 2009 to Oct 2009).
    lus funding from August 2009 to Oct 2009).  +
  • '''''Interested customers must contact Mar
    '''''Interested customers must contact Marblehead directly to apply and confirm incentive availability before starting any projects. This incentive may change or be canceled at any time.''''' <br> <br> Marblehead Municipal Light Department offers eligible customers a rebate for solar photovoltaics (PV) installations. The eligibility criteria and incentive were designed to mirror the eligibility and incentives offered under the state's Commonwealth Solar rebate program and changes when the Commonwealth Solar II program changes.* Marblehead Municipal Light Department is not required under law to contribute to the Massachusetts Renewable Energy Trust (Trust), and therefore its customers are not eligible to receive rebates through the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center programs. Marblehead accepts proposals from its customers who are interested in a solar rebate. Program availability is subject to change and/or cancellation without warning. <br> <br> *''The Commonwealth Solar II is administered by the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center.''
    y the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center.''  +
  • '''''NOTE: ''''''''''Application targets f
    '''''NOTE: ''''''''''Application targets for fiscal year 2013 have been met for the GRU Solar PV Rebate Program. The next round of applications are scheduled to open on October 1, 2013 pending approval of the GRU budget by the Gainesville City Commission.''''' Gainesville Regional Utilities (GRU) offers its customers a rebate to install photovoltaic (PV) systems. Systems with solar windows of 80% or more receive a $1.00/watt rebate. The GRU PV rebate is not available for solar windows lower than 79%. The current maximum rebate is $5,000 for residential customers. GRU must perform a pre-inspection of the applicant's site; results of the pre-inspection will determine rebate eligibility. The final rebate level will be determined following verification of the installed system by a GRU solar field inspector. The rebate only applies to locations within the GRU electric service territory. The rebate offer may not exceed the purchase price of the PV system.<br> <br> PV modules must be UL-listed or ETL-listed to qualify for the rebate. All PV systems installed must carry at least a five-year warranty from the manufacturer and installer. The contractor must be currently certified to install PV systems by the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation Construction Industry Licensing Board. Licensed electrical contractors must obtain all necessary permits and perform all electrical interconnections. The customer must carry and maintain $100,000 in liability insurance.<br> <br> All PV systems connected to GRU's electrical grid must comply with current City of Gainesville guidelines governing interconnection with GRU's electric system, and any subsequent revisions to these guidelines. Deed restrictions must not prohibit the installation of a PV system on property per Florida's solar-access law. Customers receiving rebates from GRU must transfer all renewable-energy credits (RECs) and other environmental attributes from power generated by PV systems to GRU.<br> <br> Unless otherwise specified by GRU, PV systems receiving rebates will be dual metered. Under this arrangement, customers will be paid for the electricity they generate that is not used onsite at the time of production.<br> <br> GRU retains the right to deny rebates based on inadequate solar window or poor orientation of the solar array.
    ow or poor orientation of the solar array.  +
  • '''''NOTE: All HERO program funding has be
    '''''NOTE: All HERO program funding has been allocated as of December 6, 2012. Important dates related to the closure of the program have been announced. Please see summary below for more information. ''''' The Home Energy Rebate Option (HERO) - [http://dnr.louisiana.gov/assets/TAD/programs/residential/hero/HERO_Applicant_Guidelines_Original.pdf Existing Homes Program] is offered by the Louisiana Department of Natural Resources (DNR) for residents to receive cash rebates for energy efficient improvements to existing homes that achieve a minimum of 30% energy reduction. The incentive amount is based on two factors, either the Cost of Energy Savings determined by comparing the pre-improved home to the post-improved home over the useful life of the added improvements* or the cost of the energy efficiency improvements. The cash rebate is 20% of the lesser of the two amounts up to a maximum rebate of $2,000. Owners of an existing single-family homes and two-unit residences, are eligible to apply under this program. In order to qualify, residents must make improvements that result in an annual energy savings of at least 30%. Each residence must be metered separately. In addition, certain improvements are assigned point values, which are listed on the program web site. In order to qualify, residents must incorporate any of these improvements with point values that add up to 2 to participate and 6 to receive the maximum rebate incentive. All applications must be submitted prior to the start of any renovation. The homeowner contacts a certified home energy rater listed on the Louisiana DNR site and, pending funding, gets a preliminary rating containing proposed improvements. After the home has been rated, the homeowner must make the improvements within six months. Following a final verification rating by the home rater, the HERO Program will issue a rebate to the homeowner. HERO Program rebates are taxable and Participants will receive a 1099-MISC, Miscellaneous Income Form from the State of Louisiana for the year in which the rebate is received. While the HERO Program is currently ongoing, it is scheduled to sunset over the course of 2013. Please see the list of important dates below for impending deadlines. *December 6, 2012 - last day to submit a preliminary rating that has a (6) month guarantee of funding *December 7, 2012 - preliminary ratings submitted from this date through May 2013 are only guaranteed funding until June 10, 2013 *June 10, 2013 - last day to submit finals under the HERO Program *June 11, 2013 - HERO Program ends ''*This amount is based upon an Energy Efficiency Premium HERS Rating system.'' '' **A homeowner cannot participant in both the Louisiana [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=LA06F&re=0&ee=0 Home Energy Loan Program (HELP)] and the HERO program at the same time, and can only participate one time per property. See guidelines on maximum times of participation.''
    lines on maximum times of participation.''  +
  • '''''NOTE: Applications are due by August
    '''''NOTE: Applications are due by August 19, 2011 and systems must be installed by December 31, 2011.''''' CT Solar Lease allows homeowners to lease a photovoltaic (PV) system, with fixed monthly payments, for a term of 20 years. This program, which takes advantage of federal tax credits for solar energy, is available to owners of one- to four-family homes with a household income not greater than 200% of the area's median income. No down-payment is required.* Homeowners may choose an eligible installer to design and price a PV system. All electricity generated by a leased PV system reduces the homeowner's electric bill. At the end of the 15th year, the homeowner may (1) buy the system at a reduced cost, (2) extend the lease for another five years at a reduced monthly payment, or (3) remove the system -- at the homeowner's expense -- and return the system to the program operator. At the end of the full 20 year term, the homeowner would have options (1) and (3) above. If a participating homeowner decides to sell the home, the lease must be assumed by the new homeowner, or the initial homeowner must continue to abide by the terms of the lease. The homeowner is responsible for paying all repairs and maintenance during the lease, as well as insurance. However, the CT Solar Lease program requires PV installers to warranty labor for the system for five years, and manufacturer warranties are required for the PV modules (20 years) and inverters (five years). The program assumes ownership of the renewable energy credits (RECs) associated with a PV's systems electricity generation. A portion of the value of these RECs will be set aside for the benefit of the homeowner (''Solar Dividends TM'') to be used to cover operation and maintenance expenses associated with the system, including inverter replacement as well as the cost to purchase or return the system. The CCEF, which is investing $38.6 million in this program, aims to support up to 900 PV installations through 2011. CT Solar Leasing, LLC, a non-bank subsidiary of U.S. Bancorp, will finance the purchase and installation of the systems. AFC First Financial Corporation is a partner in the development of CT Solar Lease Program and manages the application and approval processes for residents and handles the lease payments. Gemstone Lease Management, LLC is a partner in the development of the program and manages the day to day operations of CT Solar Leasing, LLC. According to AFC First Financial, the program has installed upwards of 5.4 megawatts via 800 PV installations as of July 2011. See the program web site for more details, to view a list of eligible installers, and to access an application. ''* Depending on the cost and efficiency of the leased system, the cost of electricity generated from the leased solar system might initially exceed the cost of conventional electricity. However, the program provides for an effective fixed price of electricity for up to 20 years and the Connecticut Clean Energy Fund (CCEF) expects that Connecticut homeowners will experience a significant financial benefit as a result.''
    gnificant financial benefit as a result.''  +
  • '''''NOTE: Applications for the 2010 grant
    '''''NOTE: Applications for the 2010 grant cycle are now closed. The next funding cycle will be in Spring 2011.''''' The Seattle/King County Built Green Grant Program provides periodic competitive grants for single-family residential and community development projects to help offset the cost of certifying and designing innovative green projects throughout Seattle and King County. The grants are funded through the Department of Natural Resources and Parks, Water and Land Resource Division and Seattle Public Utilities. To be eligible for this grant, buildings need to achieve either Built Green 4-star or 5-star certification. Built Green is an environmentally-friendly, non-profit, residential building program of the Master Builders Association of King and Snohomish Counties, developed in partnership with King County, Snohomish County, and other agencies in Washington State. Certification under Built Green requires achievements in energy efficiency, indoor air quality, the conservation of natural resources and water quality. Single-family homes which are certified at the 4-Star level can receive a grant of $2,500, or $5,000 if they are certified at the 5-Star level. Single-family developments of 4 or more units can receive $5,000 or $10,000 if they achieve 4-Star or 5-Star certification respectively. Community developments and multi-family developments of 10 or more units can receive $10,000 or $20,000.
    more units can receive $10,000 or $20,000.  +
  • '''''NOTE: As of December 1, 2011, this pr
    '''''NOTE: As of December 1, 2011, this program is no longer accepting applications. It is closed for the remainder of 2011. This program is not scheduled for renewal in 2012. This information is for reference only.''''' The Discretionary Grant Program, administered by the Virgin Islands Energy Office is designed to assist community groups and civic organizations with not-for-profit status, to successfully implement energy efficiency and renewable energy projects. Grants of up to $50,000 are available to help increase the energy efficiency of existing buildings. New construction projects are ineligible for this grant. Grant awardees are required to provide at least 5 percent of the grant amount requested in the form of either in-kind or cash cost-share. Projects to receive funding will be selected based on the following criteria: * Job Creation and/or Retention * Energy Savings * Innovation * Community Benefit/Collaboration * Willingness to share with public through outreach/education * Maintenance Plan * Financial Sources/Accountability The Discretionary Grant Program also provides funding for energy education outreach, solar outdoor lighting, and energy education mini-grants. The grant has been increased with funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, and additional reporting requirements will apply. See the program [http://energy.vi.gov/menubar/DGP%20%20Application%20update%20August.pdf application] for more information. Additional information is available on the Virgin Islands Energy Office web site (look under "grants").
    rgy Office web site (look under "grants").  +
  • '''''NOTE: As of October 2014, Senate Bill
    '''''NOTE: As of October 2014, Senate Bill S0746A extended the compliance period to obtain tax abatement for solar electric generating systems until December 31<sup>st</sup>, 2016. ''''' In August 2008 the State of New York enacted legislation allowing a property tax abatement for photovoltaic (PV) system expenditures made on buildings located in cities with a population of 1 million or more people. This limits the abatement to systems installed within New York City. Eligible buildings include all real property except utility real property. As originally enacted the in-service deadline for eligible systems was December 31, 2012. However, in August 2012 the abatement was extended to systems placed in service through December 31, 2014 at a reduced rate. In October 2014, the Senate Bill S0746 extended the compliance period for systems till 2016.<br> <br> The abatement allows building owners to deduct from their total real property taxes* a portion of the expenditures associated with installing a PV system on an eligible building. Systems placed in service between August 5, 2008 (the effective date) and December 31, 2010 were eligible for an abatement of 8.75% of eligible expenditures annually for four years. Systems placed in service between January 1, 2011 and December 31, 2012 are eligible for an abatement of 5.0% of eligible expenditures annually for 4 years. Systems placed in service between January 1, 2013 and December 31, 2013 are eligible for an abatement of 2.5% of eligible expenditures annually for 4 years. Systems placed in service between January 1<sup>st</sup>, 2014 and December 31, 2016 are eligible for abatement of 5% of eligible expenditures for 4 years. Thus the total property tax benefit can amount to either 35%, 20%, or 10% of the installed system cost depending on when it is built.<br> <br> The maximum abatement during a year is $62,500 or the amount of real property taxes owed during the year. Unused balances may not be carried forward to subsequent years. Eligible expenditures include reasonable expenditures for materials and labor associated with planning, designing, and installing the system. Expenditures incurred using a federal, state, or local grant are not eligible, nor are interest or finance charges. However, the amount of eligible expenditures is not reduced by federal, state or local tax credits, tax abatements, tax exemptions or tax rebates.<br> <br> The abatement program is administered by the Department of Finance in cooperation with the Department of Buildings. Applications for the abatement must be filed by March 15 in order to be eligible for a tax credit during the year the application is submitted. Applications submitted after this deadline can be applied to taxes owed for the following fiscal year. It is important to note that claiming the abatement does not affect whether a building owner can claim New York's [http://www.dsireusa.org/library/includes/incentive2.cfm?Incentive_Code=NY07F&state=NY&CurrentPageID=1&RE=1&EE=1 real property tax exemption] on the value added by solar, wind, and farm-based biogas energy systems.<br> <br> <br> *This incentive is similar to an investment tax credit for renewable energy systems, which are frequently applied to personal or corporate income taxes. It is unique in that the tax benefits are recouped through reduced property taxes on the host building instead of through reduced income taxes.
    g instead of through reduced income taxes.  +
  • '''''NOTE: As of September 2013, this prog
    '''''NOTE: As of September 2013, this program is no longer accepting any new applications. ''''' In August 2010 New Jersey enacted legislation ([http://www.njleg.state.nj.us/2010/Bills/AL10/57_.PDF S.B. 2036]) creating an offshore wind resource requirement within the [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=NJ05R&re=1&ee=1 state renewables portfolio standard (RPS)] and tax incentives for certain businesses engaged in manufacturing wind energy equipment. The term "business" is defined to include corporations subject to the state franchise tax, corporations subject to the state's insurance premiums tax, as well as partnerships, S-corporations, and limited liability corporations. The allowable tax credit is equal to 100% of the qualified capital investment made by a business. The applicant must demonstrate the state's financial support of the facility will yield a net positive benefit for the state. The program is administered by the New Jersey Economic Development Authority (EDA).<br> <br> In order to qualify for the tax credit, a business must make a minimum capital investment of $50 million in a qualifying wind energy facility which employs at least 300 new full-time employees. A tenant occupying a leased area within a qualifying wind energy facility must meet a minimum investment threshold of $17.5 million. The term qualifying wind energy facilities is defined as "any building, complex of buildings, or structural components of buildings, including water access infrastructure, and all machinery and equipment used in the manufacturing, assembly, development or administration of component parts that support the development and operation of a qualified offshore wind project, or other wind energy project* as determined by the authority, and that are located in a wind energy zone." A "wind energy zone" is defined as property within the South Jersey Port District.<br> <br> The offshore wind portion of this tax credit operates as an addition to 2007 legislation creating the Urban Transit Hub Tax Credit. Tax credits for qualifying wind facilities are generally limited to $100 million in aggregate, although the EDA has discretion to allocate tax credits that exceed this cap to "meritorious" projects if sufficient tax credit volume is available. In total, the EDA may not allocate Urban Transit Hub Tax Credits exceeding $1.75 billion. Businesses must apply for a tax credit to the EDA by January 13, 2013 (five years after the effective date of the original Urban Transit Hub Tax Credit Act), and submit documentation for approval of the credit amount by January 13, 2016 (eight years after the original effective date).<br> <br> Businesses may take the tax credit in equal increments over a 10-year period, beginning with the tax period for which the business is first approved as having met the required investment and employment qualifications. In lieu of taking the tax credit, a business may apply to the EDA for a certificate that allows them to transfer the tax credit to another party. Any tax credit sales that take place under this allowance must be for at least 75% of the face value of the credit.<br> <br> <br> ''*While most sections of S.B. 2036 apply to specifically to offshore wind energy, it appears that based on this definition, wind energy manufacturing facilities in general qualify for tax credits.''
    ties in general qualify for tax credits.''  +
  • '''''NOTE: Beginning from October 17, 2014
    '''''NOTE: Beginning from October 17, 2014, NY-Sun loan program has added Solar Thermal as an eligible resource for financing. Financing structure for Solar Thermal equipment are as same as offered for Solar PV systems. Additional financial incentives for Solar Thermal systems can be accessed [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=NY87F&re=0&ee=0 here.]''''' NY-Sun loan program is part of broader [http://dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=NY10F&re=0&ee=0 NY-Sun Initiative] program to accelerate the use of solar PV across the State. In addition to standard block-rebate incentive, NY-Sun Initiative also provides State sponsored low-interest standard and on-bill financing options for eligible customers. The PV installations up to 200 kW should be performed by a participating Solar Electric Installer. List of participating installers is available ''[http://ny-sun.ny.gov/Get-Solar/Find-A-Solar-Electric-Installer.aspx here].'' '''Residential ''' Residential customers can quality up to $13,000, or up to $25,000 with higher cost-effectiveness standards. The repayment periods can be 5, 10, or 15 years and should be within the expected life of the installation. Residential customers can choose between a standard loan or a On-Bill financing loan. These loans are provided by the [http://www.energyfinancesolutions.com/main/homeownersnyphotovoltaic/title/New%20York Energy Finance Solutions (EFS)] on behalf of NYSERDA. ''Residential Smart Energy Loan'' This loan provides a standard loan at interest rate* of 3.99%, or 3.49% if repaid through automatic bank withdrawals. In case of transfer or sale of the property, the customer remains responsible for the outstanding balance of the loan which cannot be assigned. ''Residential On-Bill Recovery Loan'' This loan provides the convenience of repayment through a regular charge on the customer’s utility bill. The payments appear as a separate item on the utility bill and is financed at a current interest rate* of 3.49%. The monthly payments may not exceed the estimated cost savings from the improvements over the loan term. In case of sale of the property, the payments can be transferable. '''Small Business and Not-For-Profit Organizations''' Small business and Not-For-Profit organizations can obtain low interest standard loan up to $100,000, or On-Bill Recovery loans up to $50,000. In addition to PV installation, the funds may also be used to finance certain eligible energy efficiency improvements in the building. More information about financing options for Small business and Not-for-Profit customers can be accessed ''[http://www.nyserda.ny.gov/Governor-Initiatives/Green-Jobs-Green-New-York/Small-Business-and-Not-for-Profits/Small-Business-Financing/Applicants.aspx here.]'' *Interest rates are subject to change
    ' *Interest rates are subject to change  +
  • '''''NOTE: Due to changes in the Rhode Isl
    '''''NOTE: Due to changes in the Rhode Island Personal Income Tax in 2010, the Renewable Energy Tax Credit is not available for systems installed in 2011, unless proposed legislation reinstates the tax credit. Be sure to contact the Rhode Island Energy Office for the latest information on this tax credit.''''' Rhode Island offers a personal tax credit for photovoltaic systems (on-grid and off-grid), solar hot-water systems, active solar-heating systems, wind-energy systems and geothermal-energy systems. The tax credit is equal to 25% of the system cost ''and applies only to residential installations''. The credit is available to the resident or business that pays for the system. Photovoltaic (PV) systems must have a minimum module size of 24 square feet, and must either be connected to the grid or to a battery-storage system. PV systems up to $15,000 are eligible for the full 25% credit. (A resident or business that pays for a PV system that exceeds $15,000 in cost will receive a credit based on a $15,000 system cost.) Solar hot-water systems must have a minimum collector area of 34 square feet and must include a storage tank that holds at least 80 gallons. Solar hot-water systems up to $7,000 are eligible for the full 25% credit. (A resident or business that pays for a solar hot-water system that exceeds $7,000 in cost will receive a credit based on a $7,000 system cost.) Active solar-heating systems must have a minimum collector area of 125 square feet, and must include a system for storing and/or distributing heat to the living area of a house. Active solar-heating systems up to $15,000 are eligible for the full 25% credit. (A resident or business that pays for an active solar-heating system that exceeds $15,000 in cost will receive a credit based on a $15,000 system cost.) Wind-energy systems must have a rotor diameter of at least 44 inches and a minimum factory-rated output of at least 250 watts (W) at 28 miles per hour. Wind-energy systems up to $15,000 are eligible for the full 25% credit. (A resident or business that pays for a wind-energy system that exceeds $15,000 in cost will receive a credit based on a $15,000 system cost.) Geothermal systems must have either a minimum coefficient of performance of 3.4, or an efficiency ratio of 16 or greater. All geothermal systems must have a commissioning sign-off by the manufacturer or distributor of the equipment to verify the proper installation and performance of the system. In addition, all geothermal systems must meet the following standards: * ARI/ASHRAE/ISO-13256-1 for water-to-air geothermal systems * ARI/ASHRAE/ISO-13256-2 for water-to-water geothermal systems * ARI/ASHRAE/ISO-13256 GWHP for groundwater heat pumps * ARI/ASHRAE/ISO-13256 GLHP for closed-loop heat pumps Geothermal systems up to $7,000 are eligible for the full 25% credit. (A resident or business that pays for a geothermal system that exceeds $7,000 in cost will receive a credit based on a $7,000 system cost.) The following systems are ''not'' eligible for the credit: passive solar space-heating systems, passive solar hot-water systems, sunspaces, solar greenhouses, PV and wind systems on boats or recreational vehicles, solar collectors for pools, existing renewable-energy systems, used renewable-energy equipment, and repairs and replacements of existing renewable-energy systems. To apply for the tax credit, taxpayers must first obtain a system approval from the Rhode Island Office of Energy Resources (RI OER), which is to be attached to the income tax filing. The RI OER website provides details on the criteria and application for system approval. Although the statute contains a provision for RI OER to certify contractors in lieu of requiring system certification, contractor certification procedures are not in place at this time.
    procedures are not in place at this time.  +
  • '''''NOTE: Electric Generation Tax expired
    '''''NOTE: Electric Generation Tax expired on October 1, 2013. Electric generation facilities are no longer required to pay generation tax.''''' In 2011, Connecticut created a new tax requiring electric power plants in the state that generate and upload electricity to the regional bulk power grid to pay $2.50 per megawatt hour. Renewable energy facilities, resource recovery facility, and customer-sited facilities are exempt from the tax. The tax and related exemptions are scheduled to sunset October 1, 2013.
    s are scheduled to sunset October 1, 2013.  +
  • '''''NOTE: Funding for this program has ex
    '''''NOTE: Funding for this program has expired, this program is now closed.''''' Klickitat PUD offers a solar PV rebate of $400 per kW-DC of installed capacity, up to a maximum amount of $1,200. This program is part of the Conservation Rate Credit program (CRC) available through the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Grid-tied residential and commercial customers are eligible. Klickitat also offers a [http://dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=WA25F&re=1&ee=1 loan program] that may be used by any installation that qualifies for a rebate.
    installation that qualifies for a rebate.  +
  • '''''NOTE: Funding is no longer available
    '''''NOTE: Funding is no longer available for this loan program.''''' Loans of up to $10,000 are available at 4.9% fixed APR with a repayment period of up to seven years. Homes must be existing residences with electric heat. Participants must have 12 months good payment history with Klickitat and must own or be purchasing the land the home sits on. Loans are secured with a lien. Payments appear on the customer's electric bill as a separate line item.
    r's electric bill as a separate line item.  +
  • '''''NOTE: HB 2893, enacted in May 2013, i
    '''''NOTE: HB 2893, enacted in May 2013, increased the capacity of the Solar Incentive Rate Pilot Program and extended the program through March, 2016, or until program capacity is filled. The most recent enrollment window (April 1, 2014), has closed. Portland General Electric, PacifiCorp, and Idaho Power are not currently accepting applications for the volumetric incentive program. There are currently no plans for an enrollment window in the fall of 2014, but a window will open May 1, 2015 to fill any remaining program capacity. ''''' In June 2009, Oregon established a pilot solar volumetric incentive rate and payment program.* Under this incentive program, systems of up to 500 kilowatts (kW) are paid for the kilowatt-hours (kWh) generated over a 15 year period, at a rate set at the time a system is initially enrolled in the program. The Public Utilities Commission (PUC) established rates and rules in May 2010. This program must be offered by the three investor-owned utilities in Oregon and will be administered by the utilities, though the PUC will periodically re-evaluate rates. The program costs are recoverable in utility rates and utility-owned systems are not allowed to receive the incentive. In May 2013, the program cap was increased from 25 megawatts (MW) to 27.5 MW, and the deadline for the program was extended to March 31, 2016. The original 25 MW aggregate program cap was divided by utility based on 2008 retail sales revenue, with specific sub-allocations for small, medium, and large scale systems. Portland General Electric (PGE) had a total allocation of 14.9 MW, Pacific Power had 9.8 MW, and Idaho Power had 0.4 MW (limited to residential systems under 10 kW). The additional 2.5 MW capacity added in 2013 has been allocated as follows: * PGE: 1,433 kW (860 small/573 medium) * Pacific Power: 1,012 kW (607 small/405 medium) * Idaho Power: 55 kW (all small) Rates differ by system size and geographic zone, and are re-evaluated for every enrollment window. Small- and medium-scale systems participate in a program that is modeled after net metering, where customers are paid for the amount of utility electric load consumption that is offset by on-site solar photovoltaic generation. The incentive paid to the customer is the volumetric incentive rate minus the retail rate. Participating PV systems must be sized no larger than 90 percent of historical energy usage for a home or business, must be grid-connected, metered, and meet all applicable codes and regulations. Systems must be "permanently installed" and must remain in service for the entire useful life. After the 15 year contract ends, systems may continue to be paid for electricity generation, with the rate based on the "resource value." As defined by the legislation, the resource value is determined by the avoided cost of energy and the avoided cost of transmission and distribution. Systems receiving the incentive payment may have reduced eligibility for some other state incentives. Systems may either take the incentive payment or the state tax credit and Energy Trust rebate; systems are not eligible for the incentive payment and the tax credit and rebate. Enrollment in the pilot program will be closed when the 27.5 MW cap is reached, or on March 31, 2016, whichever is earlier. '''Small Systems''' The original program did not specify a minimum size for eligible systems, but HB 2893 specifically refers to systems with a nameplate capacity between five and 100 kW; therefore, all projects receiving incentives in 2014 and later must be greater than 5 kW. While initially program capacity for small and medium system was allocated on a first-come, first-served basis, it is now done by lottery for small systems. Current Volumetric Incentive Rates for Small Systems (5-10 kw) are as follows: <div style="text-align: center; {
    nter; {  +
  • '''''NOTE: HB 733 did not define eligible
    '''''NOTE: HB 733 did not define eligible renewable energy or energy efficiency technologies. The LA Department of Revenue will be releasing more information about this program in the coming months and will likely establish a list of technologies eligible for these incentives. This program will use federal funding under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA).''''' In July 2009, Louisiana enacted HB 733, creating a tax credit to encourage and support the development of energy efficiency and renewable energy industries. This legislation enacted a refundable and transferable tax credit that will be provided to companies for green jobs industries, including energy efficient building, construction and retrofit industries, the renewable energy power industry, manufacturing of sustainable products, and energy efficiency and renewable energy projects. This tax credit applies broadly to projects that create green jobs and and also applies to projects for construction, repair or renovation of state-certified green projects. The tax credit awarded depends on the base investment a company makes. For base investments of greater than $100,000 and less than or equal to $300,000, companies will get a 10% tax credit. For base investments of greater than $300,000 and less than or equal to $1 million, companies will get a 20% tax credit. For base investments of greater than $1 million, companies will get a 25% tax credit. If the base investment is used for the payroll for Louisiana residents or graduates from certain Louisiana schools, then additional tax credits may be awarded. The maximum amount a company can receive in tax credits is $1 million. In total, $5 million per year is availalble on a first-come, first-served basis for a minimum of three years. Funding for this program will come from federal funding sources to support green jobs. Taking this tax credit may reduce a company's ability to take state rebates or other incentives. This tax credit can be taken against either individual or corporate income tax. Credits can be earned once 25% of expenditures have been made. The Louisiana Department of Economic Development will certify projects for this tax credit.
    will certify projects for this tax credit.  +
  • '''''NOTE: In 2010, the Federal Housing Fi
    '''''NOTE: In 2010, the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA), which has authority over mortgage underwriters Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, [http://www.fhfa.gov/Media/PublicAffairs/Pages/FHFA-Statement-on-Certain-Energy-Retrofit-Loan-Programs.aspx directed] these enterprises against purchasing mortgages of homes with a PACE lien due to its senior status above a mortgage. Most residential PACE activity subsided following this directive; however, some residential PACE programs are now operating with loan loss reserve funds, appropriate disclosures, or other protections meant to address FHFA's concerns. Commercial PACE programs were not directly affected by FHFA’s actions, as Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac do not underwrite commercial mortgages. Visit [http://pacenow.org/ PACENow] for more information about PACE financing and a comprehensive list of all PACE programs across the country.''''' Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing effectively allows property owners to borrow money from the local government to pay for energy improvements. The amount borrowed is typically repaid via a special assessment on the property over a period of years. Connecticut has authorized local governments to establish such programs, as described below. (No local governments in Connecticut currently offer residential PACE financing.) In July 2011, Connecticut passed omnibus energy legislation. In section 100, the state authorizes municipalities to create "Sustainable Energy Programs" within their respective jurisdictions (known as PACE). Municipalities that wish to establish Sustainable Energy Programs must first declare the public need for a program, then publish its intention to create a program via public notice and solicit and consider public comment. Once a program is established, the municipality is authorized to enter into a contractual assessment on the property for the amount required to complete the requested energy upgrades. The assessment is considered a lien on the property and the municipality may collect payments in a manner consistent with how the municipality collects property taxes. To finance the programs, municipalities may issue bonds, secure private funding, or state or federal funds (or a combination of these). In June 2012, Connecticut passed the Commercial PACE or "C-PACE," which is specific to non-residential property owners. The Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority is working to administer the [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=CT98F&re=0&ee=0 C-PACE financing program].
    p;re=0&ee=0 C-PACE financing program].  +
  • '''''NOTE: In 2010, the Federal Housing Fi
    '''''NOTE: In 2010, the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA), which has authority over mortgage underwriters Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, [http://www.fhfa.gov/Media/PublicAffairs/Pages/FHFA-Statement-on-Certain-Energy-Retrofit-Loan-Programs.aspx directed] these enterprises against purchasing mortgages of homes with a PACE lien due to its senior status above a mortgage. Most residential PACE activity subsided following this directive; however, some residential PACE programs are now operating with loan loss reserve funds, appropriate disclosures, or other protections meant to address FHFA's concerns. Commercial PACE programs were not directly affected by FHFA’s actions, as Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac do not underwrite commercial mortgages. Visit [http://pacenow.org/ PACENow] for more information about PACE financing and a comprehensive list of all PACE programs across the country.''''' In June 2012, Connecticut passed legislation enabling Commercial Property Assessed Clean Energy financing (C-PACE), targeting commercial, industrial and multifamily property owners. C-PACE is a financial policy tool that allows property owners to finance qualifying energy efficiency and clean energy improvements on their properties through a special assessment on the property tax bill, which is repaid over a period of years (up to 20 years). Connecticut's C-PACE program is “owner-arranged,” meaning the property owner contracts directly with a private capital provider to obtain financing. The special assessment (also called a lien) on the property automatically transfers to the next owner in the event of a sale or transfer of ownership. The lien is senior to a mortgage, although it is non-accelerated, meaning in the event of default, only the payments in arrears would come due. To participate in C-PACE financing, interested property owners must: * Be located in a participating municipality. C-PACE maintains a list of [http://www.c-pace.com/site/page/view/resources#content-participating-municipalities participating municipalities]. Interested property owners should contact CEFIA if their municipality is not on the list of participating municipalities. * Work with an approved energy professional (such as an auditor or contractor) to identify eligible projects. CEFIA will maintain a list of approved contractors. In general, improvements must be permanently affixed to the property and should either lower the building’s energy consumption or produce clean energy. * Apply for financing via CEFIA's C-PACE web site. If approved, CEFIA will place a lien on the property and financing will become available. Property owners repay the financing via the local property tax bills over the course of 20 years. * Obtain written consent of existing mortgage holders. While there is no financing minimum, PACE financing is best suited for capital improvements above $150,000, due to transaction costs. Please see [http://www.cpace.com/assets/pdf/Program_Guidelines.pdf C-PACE Program Guidebook] for more information about the program.
    k] for more information about the program.  +
  • '''''NOTE: In June 2011, the Oregon State
    '''''NOTE: In June 2011, the Oregon State Legislature passed [http://www.leg.state.or.us/11reg/measures/hb3600.dir/hb3672.en HB3672], making significant changes to the Business Energy Tax Credit program. This program is no longer available. This record is for informational purposes only.''''' Oregon's Business Energy Tax Credit (BETC) is for investments in energy conservation, recycling, renewable energy resources, sustainable buildings, and less-polluting transportation fuels. Any Oregon business may qualify, including, but not limited to, manufacturing plants, stores, offices, apartment buildings, farms, and transportation. The tax credit can cover costs directly related to the project, including equipment cost, engineering and design fees, materials, supplies and installation costs. Loan fees and permit costs also may be claimed. However, replacing equipment at the end of its useful life or equipment required to meet codes or other government regulations are not eligible. Maintenance costs are also not eligible. All projects must meet the applicable BETC [http://www.oregon.gov/ENERGY/CONS/BUS/tax/BETC-Renewables.shtml technical requirements] to qualify. Projects that use solar, wind, hydro, geothermal, biomass or fuel cells (renewable fuels only) to produce energy, displace energy, or reclaim energy from waste may qualify for a tax credit. Renewable resource projects must replace at least 10% of the electricity, gas or oil used. The energy can be used on site or sold. Solar arrays that take BETC must be used solely for business purposes, unless being installed by a homebuilder or on a rental dwelling or high performance home. Solar systems that are taking advantage of [http://dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=OR134F&re=1&ee=1 Oregon's Pilot Solar Volumetric Incentive Rates and Payments Program] are not eligible for BETC. The tax credit for facilities using or producing renewable energy resources is capped at $300 million for systems pre-certified from July 1, 2009 to June 30, 2011 and $150 million for systems pre-certified between July 1, 2011 and June 30, 2012. Projects must receive final certification before July 1, 2012, to use the tax credit. Renewable energy equipment manufacturing facilities must receive preliminary certification before January 1, 2014, in order to use the tax credit. The tax credit is also available to homebuilders who install renewable energy systems on the homes they construct. The maximum tax credit for a homebuilder is $9,000 per single-family home, or $12,000 if the system is installed on a certified high-performance home. To be considered a high-performance home, the dwelling must be certified through the Northwest Energy Star Homes Program, and meet additional requirements outlined in the technical requirements. General retrofit projects, in addition to those for lighting, and weatherization projects for rental property may be eligible for the program, as well as new construction projects, including energy efficiency and lighting. Retrofit projects must be 10% more energy efficient than the existing installation; lighting retrofits must be 25% more efficient than existing lighting. For new buildings, all measures must reduce energy use by at least 10% compared to a similar building that meets the minimum requirements of the state energy code. Cogeneration projects may also be eligible. Projects that develop new markets for recycled materials or recycle materials not required by law may be eligible for the tax credit. Projects that reduce employee commuting (or work-related travel) and investments in cleaner-burning fuels may qualify. Different cost caps and percentage caps apply to different technologies. Generally, the maximum allowable credits are as follows: * Renewable energy equipment manufacturing: 50% of certified project costs, distributed over five years (10% per year), up to $20 million; * Renewable energy generation, high efficiency combined heat and power: 50% of certified project costs, distributed over five years (10% per year), up to $10 million; * Wind projects over 10 MW: 50% of certified project costs (though only 5% of total project costs are certified costs), up to $2.5 million*; * All other projects: 35% of certified project costs, distributed over five years (10% in the first and second years, 5% each year thereafter), up to $3.5 million; and * Credit to homebuilder: $9,000 per single-family home, or $12,000 if the system is installed on a certified high-performance home. Under the pass-through option, a project owner may transfer a tax credit to a pass-through partner in return for a lump-sum cash payment (the net present value of the tax credit) upon completion of the project. The pass-through option allows non-profit organizations, schools, governmental agencies, tribes, and other public entities and businesses without tax liability to use the Business Energy Tax Credit by transferring their tax credit for an eligible project to a partner with a tax liability. As of January 1, 2010, the pass-through rate "is determined by taking the total tax credit amount divided by the sum of one plus three times the five year United States Treasury Note minus the average of the net change for the three previous calendar years of the urban Consumer Price Index (CPI) for the west region based on the index published on the first day of the calendar quarter and the first day of the same calendar quarter for the previous three calendar years exponentially raised by 5." Applications and instructions are available on the program web site. The ODOE has published a [http://egov.oregon.gov/ENERGY/CONS/BUS/docs/betcbro.pdf brochure] to explain how the tax credit works. '''History:''' Since the Business Energy Tax Credit was originally created, several pieces of legislation have modified the credit and these caps. In 2001, the Oregon Legislature added sustainable buildings to the list of measures and systems eligible for the tax credit. This addition became effective October 8, 2001, and is retroactive to January 1, 2001. In addition to several requirements set forth by the ODOE, the building must meet established standards set by the U.S. Green Building Council's Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) for Silver Certification. [http://www.leg.state.or.us/07reg/measpdf/hb3200.dir/hb3201.en.pdf HB 3201], enacted in July 2007, increased the tax credit to 50% of the total cost for renewable energy, high efficiency combined heat and power, and renewable energy equipment manufacturing facilities, with a maximum credit of $10 million. The tax credit for all other projects remains at 35% of eligible project costs. The 50% tax credit is taken over five years -- 10% each year. Any unused credit may be carried forward up to eight years. Those with eligible project costs of $20,000 or less may take the tax credit in one year. These changes were retroactive to include projects beginning on or after January 1, 2007. This legislation also created a sunset date of January 1, 2016, though this sunset date has since been modified. In March 2008, [http://www.leg.state.or.us/08ss1/measpdf/hb3600.dir/hb3619.en.pdf HB 3619] increased the maximum credit just for manufacturers of renewable energy equipment to $20 million (50% of a $40 million facility). HB 3619 also requires the Oregon Department of Energy (ODOE) to set standards related to what constitutes a manufacturing facility, as well as the facility’s minimum level of increased employment, financial viability, and the influence that the BETC would have on a manufacturer locating in Oregon. ODOE can apply those standards to certify a lesser amount of costs than applied for, including zero costs. HB 3619 also requires ODOE to consider criteria relating to the state’s general fund before determining the amount of costs eligible for the BETC. In November 2009, the Oregon Department of Energy adopted temporary administrative rules (effective from November 3, 2009, to May 1, 2010) that more stringently define criteria for separate and distinct facilities for the purpose of applying for multiple credits. The new rules also allow the Oregon Department of Energy to revoke certificates and recapture the tax credit if a project does not produce the amount of energy, jobs, or conservation described in the application. Any projects that were not pre-certified by November 3, 2009, were subject to the new rules. In March 2010, HB 3680 was signed by the governor, reducing the maximum credit available to wind facilities that have an installed capacity of more than 10 MW. These facilities are eligible for a tax credit of 50% of certified costs (though only 5% of total costs may be included in certification costs), up to $3.5 million for projects pre-certified between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2010. Systems pre-certified between January 1, 2011 and December 31, 2011, are eligible for a tax credit up to $2.5 million. Systems pre-certified on or after January 1, 2012, are eligible for a tax credit up to $1.5 million. This bill also created a maximum cap on the number of tax credits awarded. The tax credit for facilities using or producing renewable energy resources is capped at $300 million for systems pre-certified from July 1, 2009 to June 30, 2011, and $150 million for systems pre-certified between July 1, 2011 and June 30, 2012. Finally, this bill increased the discretion the Oregon Department of Energy has in issuing tax credits. The changes made by this bill were incorporated into the temporary administrative rules issued May 21, 2010. The temporary rules were effective until permanent rules replaced them on November 23, 2010. These new rules are in effect for all preliminary and final applications received on or after July 1, 2009. ''* These facilities are eligible for a tax credit of 50% of certified costs, up to $3.5 million for projects pre-certified between January 1, 2010, and December 31, 2010. Systems pre-certified between January 1, 2011 and December 31, 2011, are eligible for a tax credit up to $2.5 million. Systems pre-certified on or after January 1, 2012, are eligible for a tax credit up to $1.5 million.''
    ble for a tax credit up to $1.5 million.''  +
  • '''''NOTE: Incentives through this program
    '''''NOTE: Incentives through this program are not yet available. Electric distribution companies have until Nov 15, 2014 to submit tariffs to the Public Utility Commission (PUC). The PUC, in turn, has until March 31, 2015 to approve the tariffs. ''''' In 2014, Act H 7727 created the Renewable Energy Growth (REG) program with the goal to the promote installation of grid connected renewable energy within the load zones of electric distribution companies (EDCs) at a reasonable cost. This tariff-based incentive program is designed to finance the development, construction, and operation of renewable energy distributed generation projects through competitive bidding processes over 5 years to achieve specific megawatt (MW) targets. This program is implemented by the EDCs under supervision and review of the Public Utility Commission (PUC). For period of at least 5 years, the EDCs shall file tariffs with the PUC that are designed to provide multi year performance based incentives to eligible renewable distributed generation projects. Tariffs shall be developed by the EDCs and will be reviewed and approved by the PUC. Proposed tariffs shall include a ceiling price and term lengths that shall be from 15 to 20 years. After being approved by the PUC, the terms under the tariffs shall not be altered in any way that would undermine the reliance of those tariffs. The EDCs shall file the first set of tariffs and solicitation rules with the PUC by November 15, 2014, which the PUC shall review and approve by March 31, 2015. '''Program Goal'''<br> The REG program has target install total of 160 MW of distributed renewable energy during its 5 year term. The first year of the program (2015) has an annual target of 25 MW, 40 MW for second year, 40 MW for third and fourth year, and rest of the 160 MW for the fifth year. There is also an annual target of at least 3 MW for small scale solar projects for first 4 years of the program. '''Bidding Process '''<br> <u>Small-scale and medium-scale solar projects</u> will submit an enrollment application to receive a standard performance based incentive for the period of years in an applicable tariff. The applications shall be selected on a first come, first served basis or by means of commission-approved lottery. <u>Large scale and commercial scale solar projects and all other eligible technologies</u> shall bid a price per kilowatt-hour (kWh) for the entire output of the facility, which does not exceed the ceiling price. The EDC will select projects based on the lowest proposed prices, time of completion of the project, and award performance based incentives to the winning bidders. In order incentivize renewable distributed generation projects, the EDC may include an incentive payment adder to the bid price of any winning bidder that propose a distributed generation project in a desired geographical load area. <div> The REG program shall be administered exclusively through the tariff structure and the EDC is not required to execute a power purchase agreement (PPA) for the procurement of the renewable energy for the program. </div>
    le energy for the program. </div>  +
  • '''''NOTE: Legislation enacted in 2011 and
    '''''NOTE: Legislation enacted in 2011 and 2012 (S.B. 1652, H.B. 3036, and S.B. 3811) has changed several aspects of net metering in Illinois. For customers in competitive classes as of July 1, 2011, the law prescribes a dual metering and bill crediting system which does not meet the definition of net metering as the term is generally defined. Click here for information regarding competitive classes, and [http://www.icc.illinois.gov/ormd/ here] for information regarding competitive classes, and [http://www.icc.illinois.gov/electricity/switchingstatistics.aspx here] to find utility switching statistics. The law also increases the system capacity limit to 2 MW and the aggregate capacity limit to 5%. Additionally, agricultural residues, untreated and unadulterated wood waste, landscape trimmings, and livestock manure are added to the list of eligible resources. More information will be posted here once the ICC develops new rules. ''''' Illinois enacted legislation in August 2007 (S.B. 680) requiring investor-owned utilities in Illinois to begin offering net metering by April 1, 2008. In May 2008, the Illinois Commerce Commission (ICC) adopted final rules for net metering, effective May 15, 2008. While Illinois's investor-owned utilities and alternative retail electricity suppliers must offer net metering, the state's municipal utilities and electric cooperatives are not required to do so. In Illinois, net metering is available to electric customers that generate electricity using solar energy, wind energy, dedicated energy crops, anaerobic digestion of livestock or food processing waste, hydropower, and fuel cells and microturbines powered by renewable fuels. Systems up to 40 kilowatts (kW) in capacity that are intended primarily to offset the customer's own electrical requirements are eligible.* Each investor-owned utility and retail supplier must provide net metering and dual metering until the load of its net-metering customers and dual-metering customers equals 1% of the total peak demand supplied by the utility during the previous year. For residential customers, net metering is "typically" accomplished through use of a single, bi-directional meter. For non-residential customers, net metering is "typically" accomplished through the use of a dual meter. Dual metering is required for non-residential customers with systems greater than 40 kW but not greater than two megawatts (MW). The utility must provide the necessary metering equipment for systems up to 40 kW in capacity, while customers with systems greater than 40 kW but less than 2 MW must pay for the costs of installing necessary metering equipment. (Net metering and dual metering are not available to systems greater than 2 MW.) An electricity provider may choose to allow meter aggregation for community-owned wind, biomass, solar, or methane digesters, or other situations where multiple individual customers are served by the same renewable generating facility (such as an apartment building). S.B. 1652 added a provision that requires all net-metered systems to be installed by a certified contractor. In March 2012, the ICC opened a docket ([http://www.icc.illinois.gov/docket/Documents.aspx?no=12-0213 Case No. 12-0213]) to determine the specific certification requirements <b>Net Excess Generation and Renewable Energy Credits</b> For systems up to 40 kW in capacity, any net excess generation (NEG) during a billing period is carried over as a kilowatt-hour (kWh) credit to the following billing period. At the end of an annualized period, any remaining NEG credits in the customer's account expire. Customers may select an annualized period that ends with last day of either their April or October billing period for this purpose. For customers taking service under a time-of-use (TOU) tariff, any monthly consumption of electricity is calculated according to the terms of the contract or tariff to which the same customer would be assigned to or be eligible for if the customer was not a net-metering customer. When net-metering customers under TOU tariffs are net generators during any discrete TOU period, the net kilowatt-hours (kWh) produced are valued at the same price per kWh as the utility would charge for retail kWh sales during that same time of use period. Credits for NEG may be used to offset other charges assessed by the electricity provider. In addition, all net-metering customers (and dual-metering customers) hold ownership and title to all renewable-energy credits (RECs) and greenhouse-gas credits associated with customer generation. <i>*Illinois allows dual metering for systems greater than 40 kW but not greater than 2 MW, although the customer must pay for the metering equipment, and non-residential customers must pay for "all taxes, fees and utility delivery charges" for the gross amount of electricity delivered by the utility. As an economic incentive, dual metering is generally less favorable to customers than net metering.</i>
    to customers than net metering.</i>  +
  • '''''NOTE: On May, 2014, the Board of Publ
    '''''NOTE: On May, 2014, the Board of Public Utilities (BPU) published a report addressing methods to mitigate SREC price volatility in the market. The report can be accessed [http://www.njcleanenergy.com/files/file/Solar%20Act/Solar%20Act%20letter%20and%20SDV%20report.pdf here].''''' New Jersey’s [http://dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=NJ05R&re=0&ee=0 Renewable Portfolio Standard] (RPS) includes a carve-out for solar, requiring the each electricity Load Serving Entities (LSEs) to provide at least 4.1% of the electricity through in-state solar installations by 2028. This solar carve-out, in addition to other supporting incentives has established NJ as one of the largest and dynamic solar market in the US. Solar projects installed in New Jersey that are registered with the SREC Registration Program are qualified to generate Solar Renewable Energy Certificates (SRECs). SRECs represent the renewable attributes of solar generation, bundled in minimum denominations of one megawatt-hour (MWh) of production. New Jersey’s SREC program provides a means for SRECs to be created and verified, and allows electric suppliers to buy and retire these certificates in order to meet their solar RPS requirements. All electric suppliers must use the SREC program to demonstrate compliance with the RPS. New Jersey’s on-line marketplace for trading SRECs, launched in June 2004, is the first such operation in the world. The price of SRECs is determined primarily by their market availability and the price of the Solar Alternative Compliance Payment (SACP) for the state RPS. The SACP is effectively a ceiling on the value of SRECs because it is the per MWh payment that electricity suppliers must make if they fail to obtain enough SRECs to cover their RPS obligation. Prior to 2008 the SACP was set at $300 per MWh. This was amended in 2007, and an eight-year schedule was established by the BPU for Energy Year (EY) 2009 - 2016. In 2012 S.B. 1925 established a 15-year schedule for EY 2014 - 2028. Past and current SACP levels are as follows: {
    {  +
  • '''''NOTE: Previous Program Opportunity No
    '''''NOTE: Previous Program Opportunity Notice (PON) 2276 has been replaced with PON 2828 with updated incentives. The program is now actively accepting applications until December 31, 2015 or until the funds are fully committed. ''''' The Anaerobic Digester Gas-to-Electricity program is designed to support small-sized electricity generation where the energy generated is used primarily at the electric customer's location (third party ownership is allowed). This program is a part of New York State Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) Customer Sided Tier and is administered by New York State Energy Research and Development (NYSERDA). Applications for funding are being received until December 31, 2015, or until the funds are fully committed. Any project applications received after the fund has been exhausted will be held in a queue for next round of funding. Eligibility Customer eligibility is generally limited to those that that pay the RPS surcharge on their electric bills (i.e., customers of the state's major investor-owned utilities). The electricity generated under the program will be counted towards the Customer-Sited Tier (CST) portion of the state RPS. Potential applicants who are considering building an ADG-to-Electricity project can reach out the program to request free technical assistance for project development. Program Description A total of $57 million has been authorized to fund incentive payments for the entire program until 2015. The current PON 2828 has the budget of $10.2 million for 2014 and $10.2 million for 2015. Maximum incentive payment is limited to $2 million per Anaerobic Digester Gas (ADG) system. The total incentive available under the current PON 2828 includes several elements. Incentives can be calculated through the Incentive Calculation Tool available at NYSERDA website. Capacity based incentives include distinct incentives for the digester and generator components of a system, as well as certain additional system components or capabilities. In summary, the available incentives are as follows (see PON 2828 for further details): * Capacity Incentive: Capacity incentive is provided to offset the capital costs of installing a system. Different amount of capacity incentive is available depending on the design, construction, and type of system. Capacity incentive has two components- fixed base element and a variable element. Fixed base element range from $100,000 to $50,000, and is provided as a standard incentive depending on the system type. Variable capacity incentive ranges from $1,500 to $750 per KWh of power generation capacity. Additional capacity incentives are available for other project enhanced components including Black start capability, Hydrogen sulfide reduction, design to accept food waste and others. * Performance-Based Incentive: $0.025/kilowatt-hour (kWh) up to 10 years of verified electricity production using a 75% capacity factor. Applicant also have the option for applying for additional incentives available for H2S (Hydrogen sulfide) gas reduction processes. Incentives ranging from $0.0023/kWh- $0.004/kWh may be available depending on the type of system used for H2S reduction. * Project Enhancement Incentive: Additional incentives are available for systems designed with additional features such as Black Start Capability, Hydrogen sulfide removal, design to accept food waste, and others. * Interconnection Incentive: This incentive is provided to offset the costs related to Coordinated Electric System Interconnection Review (CESIR) process and implementation of grid connection. CESIR process is required for projects with installed capacity of 50kW to 2MW. Incentive is available to cover 75% of the CESIR costs exceeding $5,000 up to $50,000. NYSERDA counts the environmental attributes associated with energy production by funded systems towards the state RPS target for the life of the system. For further program details, including application materials and information on additional requirements, visit the program web site listed at the top of this page.
    m web site listed at the top of this page.  +
  • '''''NOTE: Since June 20, 2013, the progra
    '''''NOTE: Since June 20, 2013, the program has been managed by the NJ Board of Public Utilities (BPU) as a part of its Clean Energy Program. Applications should be directed to NJ BPU instead of NJ Economic Development Authority (EDA) who was previously was administering the program.''''' Eligibility: The New Jersey Clean Energy Program (NJCEP) offers grants for the installation of combined heat and power (CHP) or fuel cell systems to commercial, industrial, and institutional entities (including non-profits and public entities). In order to qualify for incentives, the applicant must be a contributor to the Societal Benefits Charge (SBC). Equipment must be commercially available, permanently installed, and installed on the customer side of the meter. Expansions of existing facilities may be eligible, though only the incremental expansion will be eligible for the incentive. Systems must have at least a 10-year all inclusive warranty or service contract and must be sized to meet the customer's electrical load (no more than 100% of historical annual consumption or peak demand). Third-party owned systems are eligible and must comply with the 10-year minimum warranty or service contract requirement. Program Description: The incentives amount depends on different size of the system. The grant amounts are as follows: {
    {  +
  • '''''NOTE: Solar Loan program is being upd
    '''''NOTE: Solar Loan program is being updated and''''' '''''not currently offered. ''''' The Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority is offering a pilot loan program, CT Solar Loan, to provide homeowners with 15-year loans for solar PV equipment. The loans are administered through Sungage. Interested residents must apply online to be pre-qualified for the loan. Once the loan is in place, an approved installer files permits, order equipment, and installs the system on behalf of the resident. See the program web site for application materials.
    rogram web site for application materials.  +
  • '''''NOTE: Starting Nov 25, 2013 City of D
    '''''NOTE: Starting Nov 25, 2013 City of Dover PV grants programs have been suspended for revision. ''''' Delaware's municipal utilities provide incentives for solar photovoltaic (PV), solar thermal, wind, geothermal, and fuel cell systems installed by their electric customers. Eligibility is limited to systems that are intended to supply on-site energy needs. The green energy programs offered by the state's municipal utilities occasionally vary from city to city. The Dover Green Energy Incentives program is unique in that the incentive levels and limits are distinctly different from those offered by the other municipal utilities, as well as those offered by Delmarva Power and the Delaware Electric Cooperative. For information on the incentives offered by other utilities, please visit the [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/index.cfm?re=1&ee=1&spv=0&st=0&srp=1&state=DE DSIRE Delaware page]. The incentives offered in Dover are detailed below. '''Solar Thermal (Domestic Hot Water, Radiant Heat)''': $1.00 per annual kWh saved, up to $2,500 for residential systems and $7,500 for non-residential systems '''Wind''': The incentive is $1.25/watt (W) for the first 5 kilwatts (kW) of capacity (0-5 kW), $0.75/W for the next 5 kW (5-10 kW), and $0.35/W for the next 40 kW (10-50 kW) with a maximum incentive for all sectors set at $2,500<br> <br> '''Geothermal Heat Pumps''':$800/ton for the first two tons of and $700/ton for additional capacity, up to $3,000 for residential systems and $10,000 for non-residential and non-profit systems.<br> <br> '''Fuel Cells''': 20% of installed costs, up to $7,500 for residential systems and $10,000 for non-residential and non-profit systems.<br> <br> Systems are subject to a variety of equipment, installation and warranty requirements, including limitations on system orientation and shading for solar energy systems. In addition, to encourage energy conservation, an energy audit requirement has been instituted for both residential and non-residential customers as a condition of eligibility. The Delaware Energy Office processes applications and conducts technical reviews for this program. The program rules do not specify the ownership of renewable energy credits (RECs) associated with system energy production; however, net metering customers in Delaware retain ownership of RECs unless they voluntarily relinquish such ownership. More information about the program is included in the [http://www.dnrec.delaware.gov/energy/services/GreenEnergy/Documents/DEMEC/DEMEC%20Green%20Energy%20Regs%2007142014%20-%20Final.pdf program manual]. '''Background'''<br> Under the 2005 Delaware renewable portfolio standard (RPS) legislation, municipal utilities were allowed to opt out of the RPS schedule if they met certain other requirements. One such requirement was that they contribute to the existing Green Energy Fund for investor-owned utilities or create their own green energy fund supported by an equal surcharge (i.e. $0.000178/kWh). All of Delaware's municipal utilities opted out of the RPS requirements and established their own green energy funds.<br> <br> In 2010 the Delaware RPS was amended by SS 1 for S.B. 119 and the section (26 Del. C. § 363) detailing the obligations of electric cooperatives was slightly revised. While these amendments change several other opt-out requirements, the provision mandating green energy fund contributions in the event of an opt-out remains unchanged.
    the event of an opt-out remains unchanged.  +
  • '''''NOTE: Starting from 02/12/2014, W-9s
    '''''NOTE: Starting from 02/12/2014, W-9s will not be required while filing for rebate under this program. ''''' The Delaware Sustainable Energy Utility, in partnership with the Home Builders Association of Delaware (HBADE), is offering energy efficiency rebates to new homes certified by the National Green Building Standard (NGBS), or Leadership in Environmental and Energy Design (LEED), or that have a Home Energy Rating System (HERS) of 59 or less. The Green for Green program is offered throughout the state; however not all properties qualify based on their location. Specifically, with some exceptions homes built in Level 4 areas as established by the Strategies for State Policy and Spending do not qualify. The program web site contains detailed maps showing these areas.<br> <br> In order to qualify for incentives, homes must be built by program-approved builders. Only homes with a fully signed contract dated on or after February 1, 2013 are eligible for incentives. Home buyers do not submit applications themselves; applications are submitted by the builder on the home buyer's behalf. Non-profit builders are eligible to receive rebates through this program. No individual may apply for a rebate through this program more than once every 36 months. Funding reservations expire six months after the date the application is approved. Rebates are issued when the home goes to settlement and the home has been verified as meeting the certification requirement corresponding to the rebate amount.
    rement corresponding to the rebate amount.  +
  • '''''NOTE: TVA has issued additional 100 M
    '''''NOTE: TVA has issued additional 100 MW of capacity for Renewable Standard Offer (RSO) program for 2015. Applications for new projects will open starting January 2, 2015. ''''' The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) now compliments the small generation Green Power Providers Program by providing incentives for mid-sized renewable energy generators between 50kW and 20MW to enter into long term price contracts. The goal for total production from all participants is 100MW, with no more than 50MW from any one renewable technology. The Renewable Standard Offer program also includes [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=VA61F&re=0&ee=0 Solar Solution Initiative] program that offers additional financial incentives for Solar Photovoltaic (PV) projects. TVA bases the standard offer for customer generators off of a seasonal time-of-day averages chart, which sets base prices for the term of the contract. For projects approved after January 2015, prices increase at a rate of 5% per year beginning in 2016 and may be changed with 90 days’ notice by TVA (no more than 1% per year). For 2015, the average price is expected range between $0.029/kWh during low demand periods to $0.051/kWh during high demand periods. Learn more about pricing [http://www.tva.com/renewablestandardoffer/pricing.htm here]. Generation is recorded monthly through metering equipment installed by TVA and paid for by the participant. All energy output, Renewable Energy Credits (RECs), or other environmental attributes from installations under this program belong to TVA, and all marketing of the program should indicate that TVA (not the power seller) consumes all of the energy from these renewable energy projects. Biomass, Wind, or Photovoltaics can be interconnected through either TVA's transmission system or partners' distribution systems under 10, 15, or 20 year contracts. Biomass should co-fire 50% or more with the fuel consumption content approved by TVA and separately metered. The remainder of the biomass production can be purchased through the TVA's Dispersed Power Production Program. Before approval, the seller must provide TVA with project financing arrangements, interconnection agreements between the seller and either TVA or a Distributor, and TVA metering installation plans at an environmentally acceptable location. The participating power producer is responsible for interconnection, performance assurance, and application costs. TVA, or an approved third party, will also perform an environmental review at the seller’s cost.
    environmental review at the seller’s cost.  +
  • '''''NOTE: The Biopower program is no long
    '''''NOTE: The Biopower program is no longer accepting new applications for FY2014; next round of solicitations will be available on FY2015. The Energy storage program is also under development, and will be available in FY2015.''''' New Jersey's 1999 electric restructuring legislation provides for investments in energy efficiency and renewable energy through a "Societal Benefits Charge" (SBC) collected from all customers of electric public utilities. In March 2001, the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities (BPU) approved funding for renewable-energy programs, including a customer-sited renewables rebate program for homes, businesses, institutions and non-profits. The program is currently managed by Honeywell under supervision of NJ BPU. Currently, incentives are only available for sustainable biomass energy technologies. Energy Storage portion of the program is currently under development, and will be open for solicitations on FY2015. The wind energy portion of the program has been on hold and is not accepting any new applications. The rebates for the photovoltaic (PV) installations are no longer offered through this program. PV systems remain eligible to generate [http://www.dsireusa.org/library/includes/incentive2.cfm?Incentive_Code=NJ07F&state=NJ&CurrentPageID=1&RE=1&EE=1 Solar Renewable Energy Certificates (SRECs)] and may be eligible for specialized programs based in the SREC market. Click [http://njcleanenergy.com/renewable-energy/programs/utility-financing-programs/utility-financing-programs here] for further details on the individual utility programs. '''Program Description''' Sustainable biomass projects are categorized in New Jersey as Class I renewable energy resource under its Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS). Incentives for biomass projects are available under Biopower program offered as part of Renewable Energy Incentive Program (REIP). Financial incentives for the program are offered through competitive solicitations. There is no limit to the system size of the project, however maximum incentive per project is capped at $750,000 or 30% of the project costs, whichever is less. Maximum incentive per entity is capped at $1,125,000- this does not apply to project developers. Any new equipment purchased for enhancing the performance of an existing biomass plant also qualify for the incentive. To encourage rapid completion of projects, additional bonus incentive of 10% is provided to projects that are completed within 12 month after the approval date. Projects that take 12-18 months are eligible for 100% of the incentive. Any projects that require extension beyond the 18 month period only obtain 90% of the total approved incentive. '''Eligibility''' Any sustainable biopower projects that convert biomass into energy that can fuel either fuel cells, micro-turbines, spark ignition engines, and combustion turbines for generating electricity are eligible for the program. Any technology such as anaerobic digestion, gasification, combustion and pyrolysis can be used to convert biomass into energy. Examples of eligible facilities include * Digestion of Sewage Sludge * Landfill Gas Facilities * Combustion of wood wastes to steam turbine * Gasification of wood wastes to reciprocating engine * Gasification or pyrolysis of biosolid wastes to generation equipment Municipal solid waste incinerators, mass incinerators, sludge incinerators and combustion of adulterated wood are not eligible for the program. The applicants must demonstrate that energy crop or waste is available on a sustainable basis and the combustion of biomass must pass NJ’s regulatory emission standard. The New Jersey Clean Energy Program web site provides all application materials, complete funding schedules and information about current incentive levels.
    nformation about current incentive levels.  +
  • '''''NOTE: The Renewable Resource Program
    '''''NOTE: The Renewable Resource Program will accept requests for grant funding for calendar year 2013 beginning January 9, 2013. Applications for residential PV and geothermal systems will not be accepted after 4:30 pm on January 15, 2013. Applications for all other systems will be accepted until this year’s program budget of $260,481 is exhausted. For 2013, the total annual funds available will be allocated as follows: Small Wind Turbines = 2%, Geothermal Systems = 28%, PV Class A = 50%, PV Class B = 20%.''''' The Delaware Electric Cooperative provides incentives for solar photovoltaic (PV), solar thermal, wind, geothermal, and fuel cell systems installed by DEC member-owners. Eligibility is limited to systems that are intended to supply on-site energy needs. Incentives are available to both residential and non-residential member-owners based upon average peak demand over a 12 month period. Class A member-owners are defined as those with an average monthly peak electric demand of 50 kilowatts (kW) or less over the previous twelve months. Class B member-owners are those with an average monthly peak electric demand of greater than 50 kW over the previous twelve months. Maximum incentives are up to $7,500 for Class A and $10,000 for Class B and non-profit systems. Applicants may be required to have an energy audit performed by a Building Performance Institute (BPI) certified contractor prior to grant approval. Energy Star homes may be exempted from this requirement. Both grid-connected and off-grid PV and wind energy systems are eligible for incentives, but systems must serve loads that would otherwise be served by the electric utility. Solar thermal systems used for domestic water heating or in radiant heating applications must reduce or eliminate the need for electric or gas heated water. Renewable energy systems designed and utilized as a third-party ownership or independent power producer are not eligible for grant funding. Incentive levels and limits vary by technology, system size and sector as follows: '''Solar PV''' * Class A and Class B: $.90/W for the first 5 kW of capacity (0-5 kW) and $0.45/W over 5 kW. Maximum incentive of $7,500 for Class A and $10,000 for Class B. * Non-profits: $1.05/W for the first 5 kW of capacity (0-5 kW) and $.52/W over 5 kW (5-10 kW). Maximum incentive of $10,000 for non-profit systems. '''Solar Thermal''' * Domestic Hot Water: 20% of installed costs up to $3,000 for residential systems and $7,500 for non-residential systems. * Radiant Heating: 20% of installed costs up to $5,000 for residential systems and $7,500 for non-residential systems '''Wind''': $1.25/W up to $2,500 '''Fuel Cells''': 20% of installed costs, up to $7,500 for residential systems and $10,000 for non-residential systems '''Geothermal Heat Pumps''': $800/ton for first two tons and $700/ton for additional capacity, up to $5,000 for residential and $10,000 for non-residential systems. Systems are subject to a variety of equipment, installation and warranty requirements, including limitations on system orientation and shading for solar energy systems. The Delaware Energy Office processes applications and conducts technical reviews for this program. The program rules do not specify the ownership of renewable energy credits (RECs) associated with system energy production; however, net metering customers in Delaware retain ownership of RECs unless they voluntarily relinquish such ownership. '''Background''' Under the 2005 Delaware renewable portfolio standard (RPS) legislation, electric cooperatives were allowed to opt out of the RPS schedule if they met certain other requirements. One such requirement was that they contribute to the existing Green Energy Fund for investor-owned utilities or create their own green energy fund supported by an equal surcharge (i.e. $0.000178/kWh). The Delaware Electric Cooperative (DEC), the state's lone cooperative, opted out of the RPS requirements and established its own green energy fund. In 2010 the Delaware RPS was amended by SS 1 for S.B. 119 and the section (26 Del. C. § 363) detailing the obligations of electric cooperatives was slightly revised. While these amendments change several other opt-out requirements, the provision mandating green energy fund contributions in the event of an opt-out remains unchanged.
    the event of an opt-out remains unchanged.  +
  • '''''NOTE: The most recent application per
    '''''NOTE: The most recent application period closed on October 28, 2011. Check the program web site for information regarding future solicitations. '''''<br> The Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity administers the Renewable Energy Business Development Grant Program. The program will support expenses related to the development, retooling, or expansion of renewable energy business and component manufacturers. Eligible costs include the purchase and installation of machinery, equipment and new industrial systems, necessary site improvements, technical or engineering services for process improvements, and the conversion of existing processes. Grant awards are available for between $100,000 and $500,000 and are limited to 50% of project costs. Applications will be accepted until October 28, 2011, subject to funding availability. Renewable-energy technologies eligible for funding support include wind energy, solar-thermal energy, photovoltaics, dedicated crops grown for energy production and organic waste biomass, hydropower that does not involve new construction or significant expansion of hydropower dams, and "other such alternative sources of environmentally preferable energy." Energy from the incineration, burning or heating of waste wood, tires, garbage, general household, institutional and commercial waste, industrial lunchroom or office waste, landscape waste, or construction or demolition debris is not eligible. Projects must be located in Illinois. In addition, because the program is funded by the Renewable Energy Resources Trust Fund, grants are available only to customers of utilities that impose the Renewable Energy Resources and Coal Technology Development Assistance Charge, as defined in 20 ILCS 687/6-5. Participating utilities are listed on the application available at the program website. See the program web site for additional details and requirements.
    e for additional details and requirements.  +
  • '''''NOTE: The most recent solicitation fo
    '''''NOTE: The most recent solicitation for this program closed August 1, 2014. Please check the program website for information on future solicitations.'''''<br> <br> The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) offers an ongoing grant program for the improvement of energy generation, transmission, and distribution facilities in rural communities. This program began in 2000. Eligibility is limited to projects in communities that have average home energy costs at least 275% above the national average. Individuals, non-profits, commercial entities, state and local governments (including any agency or instrumentality thereof), and tribal governments are eligible for this grant. Individuals must work on a project that will benefit the community in order to qualify. Under the most recent solicitation for projects, a total of $7 million was available for qualifying projects. Under this solicitation grants ranging from $50,000 to $3 million were available for a variety of activities, including: * Electric generation, transmission, and distribution facilities; * Natural gas or petroleum storage or distribution facilities; * Renewable energy facilities used for on-grid or off-grid electric power generation, water or space heating, or process heating and power; * Backup up or emergency power generation or energy storage equipment; and * Weatherization of residential and community property, or other energy efficiency or conservation programs. This grant program is not limited to renewable energy or energy conservation and efficiency measures, but these measures are eligible for this grant program.
    sures are eligible for this grant program.  +
  • '''''NOTE: The program is currently accept
    '''''NOTE: The program is currently accepting Request for Proposals (RFP) for Sustainable Energy Financing Projects. The applications are due by January 29, 2015. ''''' The West Penn Power Sustainable Energy Fund (WPPSEF) promotes the use of renewable energy and clean energy among commercial, industrial, institutional and residential customers in the West Penn market region. Eligible technologies include solar, wind, low-impact hydro, sustainable biomass such as closed-loop biomass and biomass gasification, and innovative natural gas technologies as well as energy efficiency. Clean energy refers to advanced technologies, including landfill gas and fuel cells, which use fossil fuels but have significantly lower emissions and waste than current commercialized technologies and fuels derived from waste. The WPPSEF accepts proposals for financing year round. The projects should be aligned with WPPSEF's mission and should benefit the West Penn Power ratepayers. Funding for eligible projects may include commercial loans, equity investment, subordinated debt and royalty financing. Commercial loans are available to manufacturers, distributors, retailers and service companies involved in renewable and advanced clean energy technologies, as well as energy efficiency and conservation products and services to end-user companies and community-based organizations. WPPSEF intends to initiate loan programs in conjunction with other agencies and intermediaries to ensure an adequate flow of financing proposals for consideration.<br> <br> WPPSEF will seek out loan proposals that may not be currently bankable but are acceptable credit risks. For small business lending, the ability to repay a business loan is based primarily on operating cash flow. Also, commercial lending is based on the management experience, ability and character of the management team. WPPSEF will offer term loans to finance energy-efficient equipment, construction, and provide working capital financing as part of a larger request. WPPSEF would charge a below market rate of interest, and secure the loans with available collateral. Further information on funding opportunities can be found on the program web site listed at the top of this page.
    m web site listed at the top of this page.  +
  • '''''NOTE: The program is currently accept
    '''''NOTE: The program is currently accepting applications for 2% interest loans and leases for municipal and not-for-profit entities located in Pennsylvania for energy efficiency and renewable energy projects. The applications are due on January 29<sup>th</sup>, 2015.''''' The Sustainable Energy Fund (SEF) promotes and invests in energy efficiency and renewable energy projects, and energy education initiatives. Financial incentives are offered as loans to promote clean energy technologies and for projects where energy savings are measurable. Eligible clean technology applications include energy efficiency, renewable energy, green building, and clean transportation. Financing terms are customized to the unique requirements of individual projects.The SEF has also developed Energypath, a comprehensive resource intended to assist Pennsylvanians in locating contractors, grants, loans, equipment manufacturers, rebates and technical assistance. The SEF was founded in November 1999 as a result of the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission electric utility restructuring proceedings. The SEF was a key component of the joint settlement with PPL, Inc. (now PPL Electric Utilities Corporation) and the PUC. The fund has collected slightly more than $25 million since opening through a rate surcharge on PPL ratepayers. The surcharge expired and was not renewed at the end of 2006. See DSIRE's summary of Pennsylvania's Public Benefits Funds for more information.
    ublic Benefits Funds for more information.  +
  • '''''NOTE: The program is currently open f
    '''''NOTE: The program is currently open for solicitations; applications are due by 12pm, December 19, 2014. ''''' Game Changer Competitive Grant Program is designed to support innovative renewable energy systems and strategies that result in additional renewable energy capacity installed in the State of Maryland. Eligibility Applicants much show that the project can be completed by December 1, 2015. All of the projects should be physically located in Maryland. Program Description Total of $1 million is available for the program, with typical awards ranging from $50,000 to $250,000. The grant is limited to 30% of the project costs. Awards are intended to support cutting edge renewable technology projects that are “game changing” and are in their early stages of commercialization. Funding is not limited to renewable energy systems but also towards innovative project design ideas targeted towards increasing renewable energy systems, financing ideas, and overcoming barriers for renewable energy deployment. Potential projects may include, but are not limited to: * Hybrid solar photovoltaic/ thermal energy systems that cool the PV system while generating hot water * Solar thermal heating and absorption cooling systems * Low-maintenance solar photovoltaic array tracking systems * Renewable energy generation and storage systems that could be aggregated for efficient transactions with independent operating systems for ancillary services * Renewable energy generation and storage systems that could be aggregated for efficient transactions with independent operating systems for ancillary services * District energy geothermal heating and cooling systems * Biofueled distributed generation and/or combined heat and power systems * Cost-competitive fuel cells that can add backup, peak-shaving and/or baseload * Crowd funding platforms for renewable projects * Innovative employer electric vehicle programs * project to expand access to financing for renewable energy systems to underserved populations * Projects that lower barriers to entry to new renewable energy financing partners in Maryland
    able energy financing partners in Maryland  +
  • '''''NOTE: The third enrollment period for
    '''''NOTE: The third enrollment period for standard contracts for 2014 closed on November 7.''''' Rhode Island enacted legislation (H.B. 6104) in June 2011 establishing a feed-in tariff for new distributed renewable energy generators up to three megawatts (MW) in capacity. The law requires electric distribution companies to enter into standard contracts for an aggregate capacity of at least 40 MW by the end of 2014. Standard contracts include a fixed payment rate and a 15-year term, and generally vary by generator capacity and type. Eligible renewables include solar energy, wind energy, ocean-thermal energy, geothermal energy, small hydropower, biomass facilities that maintain compliance with current air permits,* and fuel cells using renewable resources. Separate classes have been established for “large” generators and “small” generators. Small generators include solar energy systems between 50 kilowatts (kW) and 500 kW, and wind energy systems between 50 kW and 1.5 MW. The Distributed Generation Standard Contract Board will determine capacity limits for other “small” systems, but limits may not exceed 1 MW. (The Board is authorized to modify this program in several ways, as specified in the authorizing legislation.) Payment rates vary by system size and type. The contracting period is spread over four years. The following annual minimum targets for standard contracts have been established: * By December 30, 2011: 5 MW of aggregate capacity * By December 30, 2012: 20 MW of aggregate capacity * By December 30, 2013: 30 MW of aggregate capacity * By December 30, 2014: 40 MW of aggregate capacity The Board must set ceiling prices by October 15 for the following calendar year. Each electric distribution company must conduct one standard contract enrollment period in 2011 and at least three enrollment periods in subsequent program years. Each enrollment period will be open for two weeks. Eligible small and large projects will be assessed separately, and projects from each class will be awarded standard contracts based on the lowest proposed prices received. Eligible systems that are net-metered may apply to sell excess output.<br> ''* Waste-to-energy combustion systems are explicitly excluded.''
    bustion systems are explicitly excluded.''  +
  • '''''NOTE: The third funding cycle closed
    '''''NOTE: The third funding cycle closed December 31, 2012. The current funding cycle runs from February 1, 2013 to June 30, 2013. There is $4,823,507 available for this funding cycle.<br> ''''' With funding from Puerto Rico's Green Energy Fund, Tier I rebates are available for photovoltaic (PV) and wind systems up to and including 100 kW in capacity on a first-come, first-served basis. Projects are eligible for a rebate up to 40% of installed costs, as long as the calculated dollar per watt installed cost is less than the Reference Cost. If project costs exceed the Reference Cost, the incentive will be calculated by using the Reference Cost. Note, higher Reference Costs are allowed in the Special Vieques-Culebra Economic Development Zone. The standard Reference Costs are: * Photovoltaic (PV) and small wind turbines less than or equal to 15 kilowatts (kW): $5.50/Watt (W) * Photovoltaic (PV) and small wind turbines greater than 15 kW and less than or equal to 100 kW: $5.00/W For this funding cycle, there is $2,000,000 available systems 15 kW in capacity or less and $2,823,507 for systems greater than 15 kW but smaller than 100 kW. Applications are completed online. There is a one-time application fee of $250 for systems up to and including 15 kW and $1000 for systems greater than 15 kW. Approved projects must then execute the Reservation Agreement and pay the Reservation Guarantee or provide performance bond of $1000 for systems up to and including 15 kW and 1% of the installed cost for systems greater than 15 kW. Systems should have approved interconnection permits from the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA). Once the system is installed, subsequent documentation is required to receive the incentive payment. Additional requirements and application steps apply; refer to the Green Energy Fund regulations and the most recent version of the Tier I Reference Guide for additional details, both found on the program web site.
    tails, both found on the program web site.  +
  • '''''NOTE: There is one application period
    '''''NOTE: There is one application period per quarter. Applications must be submitted by the fifth day of each quarter (July 5, October 5, January 5, and April 5). <br> ''''' With funding from Puerto Rico's Green Energy Fund, Tier II competitive grants are available for photovoltaic (PV) and wind systems over 100 kilowatts (kW) and up to and including one megawatt (MW). Projects are eligible for up to 50% of installed project costs, although because this is a competitive grant, projects that request less are more likely to receive funding. The Reference Costs used for calculating the maximum incentive amount are:* * Solar Photovoltaic (PV): $6.00/Watt (W) * Wind turbines: $6.00/Watt (W) The maximum incentive is determined by multiplying 50% by the corresponding Reference Cost and system capacity. There is a one-time application fee of $2,000 for systems up to and including 300 kW and $4,000 for systems greater than 300 kW. Awarded projects must execute the Reservation Agreement and pay the Reservation Guarantee or provide a performance bond of 1% of the total installed cost. Once the system is installed, subsequent documentation and a site visit is required to receive the incentive payment. Projects will be evaluated on a scoring system including but not limited to the following criteria: # Incentive amount requested # Cost-effectiveness # Project development experience and local experience # Total project cost per system # Project benefits including the expected production over the lifespan of the system; amount of avoided greenhouse gas emissions, avoided waste water, avoided solid waste generated and avoided water usage; green jobs created and/or economic development benefits # Project location and siting, including potential interconnection issues, possible permits, land access or ownership, and availability of green energy resources # Project finances, including the ability to provide expected development costs through self-funding or third-party financing. All awarded projects must carry sufficient insurance per the regulations and must install utility grade performance meters. Additional requirements and application steps apply; refer to the Green Energy Fund regulations and the most recent Tier II Reference Guide for additional details, both found on the program web site. ''*Higher Reference Costs are allowed in the Special Vieques-Culebra Economic Development Zone.''<br>
    bra Economic Development Zone.''<br>  +
  • '''''NOTE: This low-interest loan program
    '''''NOTE: This low-interest loan program is separate from the Small-Scale Energy Loan Program offered by the Oregon Department of Energy. This loan program is offered by a private bank, Umpqua Bank, for customers working with Energy Trust and their trade ally contractors.''''' Energy Trust of Oregon and Umpqua Bank have partnered to offer this loan to homeowners and small businesses for renewable energy and energy efficiency investments. These loans have no loan fees, no closing costs, and offer preferred rates to homeowners and small businesses interested in certain renewable energy and energy efficiency projects. To qualify for a loan, an individual or business must be a customer of PGE, Pacific Power, NW Natural or Cascade Natural Gas. There are several different loan options that carry different interest rates and terms. Homeowners are eligible for two types of loans, the Home Equity Loan and the Unsecured Home Improvement Loan. The Home Equity Loan is for $5,000 to $100,000, carries a fixed interest rate, and a term of up to 15 years. The Unsecured Home Improvement Loan is for $1,000 to $50,000, carries a fixed interest rate, and has a term of up to 5 years. Small businesses and owners of multifamily residential property are eligible for two types of loans, the Commercial Real Estate Improvement Loan and the Business Term Loan. The Commercial Real Estate Improvement Loan is for $5,000 to $250,000, has a variable interest rate, and carries a term of up to 15 years. The Business Term Loan is for $5,000 to $250,000, has a fixed interest rate, and carries a term of up to 7 years. These loans can be taken for efficient heating and cooling systems, water heating systems, insulation, windows, solar energy systems, air and duct sealing, lighting, appliances, and wind energy systems. Eligible technologies vary by customer type. Several Energy Trust incentives are also available for projects that qualify for these loans.
    for projects that qualify for these loans.  +
  • '''''NOTE: This model ordinance was design
    '''''NOTE: This model ordinance was designed to provide guidance to local governments that wish to develop their own siting rules for renewable energy projects. While it was developed by the Oregon Department of Energy, the model itself has no legal or regulatory authority.''''' The Oregon Department of Energy issued guidance to local governments to address wind, solar, geothermal, biomass, and co-generation project planning needs at the city and county level in July 2005. The [http://www.oregon.gov/ENERGY/SITING/docs/ModelEnergyOrdinance.pdf Model Ordinance for Energy Projects] describes energy projects and siting issues and includes model ordinance language and commentary. Energy projects below certain thresholds are not regulated by the Oregon Energy Facility Siting Council, so the model ordinance can serve as a basis for local regulation of these energy projects. The model language provides a conceptual framework that local governments can adapt to suit local circumstances and to address local energy resources. The model ordinance not only includes general standards for all energy projects, but also details specific standards for different technologies. Specific standards for wind address visual impact, wildlife resources, public safety, and setbacks. The model ordinance is intended to apply to commercial wind projects; residential or agricultural projects under 50 kilowatts (kW) in size are exempt. Specific standards for solar address acreage, ground leveling, wildlife resources, misdirection of solar radiation, public safety, airport proximity, and cleaning chemicals and solvents. The model ordinance is intended to apply to large-scale solar electric projects that generate electricity for structures located off-site. It should be noted that the specific setback and clearance distances in the model ordinance are meant to be suggestions only; they illustrate the concept, but are not formal recommendations or standards. The model ordinance also includes guidance on electric power transmission and distribution lines, natural gas and petroleum pipelines, and biofuel production plants.
    pipelines, and biofuel production plants.  +
  • '''''NOTE: This program has been suspended
    '''''NOTE: This program has been suspended for the 2014 calendar year.''''' Gainesville Regional Utilities (GRU), a municipal utility owned by the City of Gainesville, offers a solar feed-in tariff (FIT) for solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. Modeled on Germany's FIT, GRU purchases energy from qualified PV systems via a standard offer contract at predetermined rates for a period of 20 years, plus the remaining balance of the calendar year in which the contract is executed. Both residential and commercial generators are eligible. Commercial generators can either enter into a FIT agreement or net meter. Residential customers with PV systems less than 10 kilowatts (kW) have the option to enter into a FIT agreement and sell 100% of their electricity to GRU, or to net meter and only send the excess electricity to GRU under the terms established for that program. For those residential customers who choose to net meter, GRU offers a [http://www.dsireusa.org/library/includes/incentive2.cfm?Incentive_Code=FL49F&state=FL&CurrentPageID=1&RE=1&EE=1 rebate] to those who qualify. Any system that has previously received a solar PV rebate, entered into a net metering agreement or been financed with a Low Interest Energy Efficiency Loan from GRU is not eligible.<br> <br> For contracts executed in 2013, the fixed rate for the life of the contract are $0.21/kWh, $0.18/kWh or $0.15/kWh (depending on size and application). There are separate rates for rooftop- or pavement-mounted systems or ground-mounted systems. A total capacity of 2.53 MW is available for 2013 contracts, of which 200 kW is reserved for residential solar projects. For contracts executed in 2013, the rates are as follows: * All systems 10 kW or less: $0.21/kWh * Building- or pavement-mounted systems between 10 and 300 kW: $0.18/kWh * Ground-mounted systems between 10 and 25 kW: $0.18/kWh * Ground-mounted systems between 25 and 1,000 kW: $0.15/kWh If the amount of capacity requested during current application period exceeds the amount of available capacity, a third party will select projects by a random drawing. If the full capacity is not requested during the specified application period, then applications will be accepted until capacity is met. All renewable energy credits (RECs) associated with customer generation belong to the utility. Application information and required documentation can be found on the [http://www.gru.com/OurCommunity/Environment/GreenEnergy/solar.jsp GRU solar feed-in-tariff website]. ''*For contracts executed in 2012, the fixed rate for the life of the contract started at $0.24/kWh, $0.22/kWh or $0.19/kWh (depending on size and application) and decreased over time. ''
    d application) and decreased over time. ''  +
  • '''''NOTE: This program is accepting low i
    '''''NOTE: This program is accepting low income residential voucher applications only from December 27, 2012 until January 17, 2013. After this time period the standard residential voucher applications will become available.''''' The Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) and Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources (DOER) are currently offering rebate vouchers through the Commonwealth Woodstove Change-Out Pilot Program. This program assists eligible Massachusetts residents with the cost of replacing non-EPA-certified wood-, wood-pellet-, or coal-burning stoves with high efficiency, low emissions wood stoves or fireplace inserts, or wood-pellet stoves or fireplace inserts. New stoves must be professionally installed and the installation must be coordinated and certified by the retailer. Old stoves must be permanently removed from service and rendered unusable. The retailer is charged with the coordination of stove disposal and recycling. All applicable federal, state and local building codes and regulations, safety standards and certifications must be adhered to. Eligible replacement stoves or inserts must meet the technical requirements listed below: *Catalytic Converter: 2.5 grams per hour of particulate matter (g/hr PM) *Non Catalytic Converter: 4.5 g/hr PM and minimum 70% efficiency Low income residents who qualify for the program are eligible for a flat $2,000 rebate, and standard residential customers who qualify for the program are eligible for a flat $1,000 rebate. Rebate vouchers will be available until program funding has been exhausted. In order to be eligible for a rebate voucher, the property owner must not have received a Commonwealth Woodstove Change-Out Pilot Program Voucher in the last year, the stove must serve a year-round residence and the project site electric bill must contribute to MassCEC’s [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=MA07R&re=0&ee=0 Renewable Energy Trust Fund]. Rebate vouchers must be approved by MassCEC prior to being redeemed at retail locations. Applications must be submitted according to MassCEC format guidelines. See the program website for details and for a complete application package.
    ls and for a complete application package.  +
  • '''''NOTE: This program is currently being
    '''''NOTE: This program is currently being revised and will be changed in January 2011.''''' Orcas Power and Light (OPALCO), an electric cooperative serving Washington’s San Juan Islands, provides a production-based incentive for residential and commercial members who generate energy from wind and micro-hydroelectric sources. To receive an incentive, members must sign an Agreement for Interconnection granting OPALCO rights to the system’s Green Tags (renewable energy certificates). For wind and micro-hydroelectric systems, the member receives $1.50 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) for half of the estimated first-year production. At the end of the year, a "true up" is paid based on the actual generation as determined by an OPALCO meter minus the initial estimate. The total incentive may not exceed $4,500. For 2010, the overall renewable energy program budget is $25,000. Orcas Power and Light also offers a [http://www.dsireusa.org/library/includes/incentive2.cfm?Incentive_Code=WA06F&state=WA&CurrentPageID=1 rebate] for solar photovoltaic systems.
    =1 rebate] for solar photovoltaic systems.  +
  • '''''NOTE: This program started accepting
    '''''NOTE: This program started accepting applications for the Fiscal Year 2014-2015 on October 06, 2014. Applications will be accepted until April 15th 2015, or until the funds are exhausted.''''' Established in July 2004, the PA Small Business Advantage Grant Program provides matching funds to for-profit businesses with a maximum of 100 full-time employees for improvements in energy efficiency and pollution prevention. The business must also be the primary source of employment for at least one full-time employee. The Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) administers the grants, providing up to $9,500 for proposed projects. Under the most recent solicitation, projects must demonstrate annual savings of at least 25% in energy consumption or pollution output plus $500 in annual monetary savings as a direct result of the proposed project. A recipient of the grant must submit a follow-up report to the DEP twelve months after the project completion date, detailing the environmental benefits and the financial costs and benefits as a result of the project. Prior to submitting an application for the 2012 program, eligible businesses must first (1) obtain a Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Vendor Registration Number; and (2) provide a completed checklist and a W-9 with the application. Franchises are not eligible for funding. Projects that receive energy efficiency incentives from a utility are not eligible for additional funding through the Small Business Advantage Grant Program. Residential rental units and dwellings are not eligible for awards, nor are outdoor wood burners, wood-fired boilers, photovoltaics (PV), solar hot water, room air-conditioners, vending machines, and some types of building envelope measures. The measures identified above as eligible equipment are based on examples provided in program documents and lists of awards made for prior solicitations. The program provided more than $564,000 in grants for 90 projects under the 2010 solicitation. Further information on eligible technologies and the application process are provided in the [https://mail-attachment.googleusercontent.com/attachment/u/0/?ui=2&ik=2897c86624&view=att&th=14a06643c32af6f5&attid=0.1&disp=inline&safe=1&zw&saduie=AG9B_P9F3-VqzVA6Gcq8EpXiP52C&sadet=1417452168399&sads=fuXWhYmbxF3JxOaV74CjeKBGN1k&sadssc=1 program document].
    4CjeKBGN1k&sadssc=1 program document].  +
  • '''''NOTE:''''' '''''It is important to no
    '''''NOTE:''''' '''''It is important to note that some applicants are only eligible to apply under some aspects of the program. Political subdivisions are only permitted to apply for loans or grants for Clean Energy Projects. Businesses and non-profits may apply for loans for Alternative Energy Production Projects and Clean Energy Projects, but may only apply for grants for Alternative Energy Production Projects and for site preparation for an alternative energy system as a Clean Energy Project.''''' In July 2008, Pennsylvania enacted a broad $650 million alternative energy bill designed to provide support for a variety of renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies. Included in this legislation was a provision authorizing the creation of a grant and loan program for alternative energy and clean energy production projects. The program is jointly administered by the Department of Community and Economic Development (DCED) and the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), under the direction of Commonwealth Finance Authority (CFA). The most recent Program Guidelines were issued in October 2013 available [http://www.newpa.com/sites/default/files/uploads/AlternativeAndCleanEnergy_Guidelines_2013-2.pdf here]. Incentives are available to businesses (including non-profits), economic development organizations, and political subdivisions (e.g., local governments, schools, etc.). The program will offer support for alternative energy and clean energy projects in the form of loans, grants and loan guarantees (i.e., grants to be used in the event of a financing default). Under this program, alternative energy production projects and clean energy production projects are governed by distinct sets of definitions and rules. Eligible activities for each type of project are described briefly below (see program rules for more detailed descriptions).<br> <br> '''Clean Energy Projects''' * Construction or renovation of a High Performance Building. * Site preparation of a business park consisting exclusively of certified High Performance Buildings. * Installation of equipment to facilitate or improve energy conservation or energy efficiency (including but not limited to heating, lighting, and cooling equipment). Equipment must be ENERGY STAR rated if applicable. * Installation of an alternative energy system which produces energy from sources defined under the state[http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=PA06R&re=1&ee=1 Alternative Energy Portfolio Standard (AEPS)], including wind, geothermal, biomass, waste energy, hydroelectric, fuel cells, biologically derived methane gas, fuel cells, and biomass; but '''not including solar energy'''.* * Replacement or enhancement of an existing energy system that utilizes nonrenewable energy with an energy system that utilizes alternative energy (as described above). * Modification of the contract terms of an energy service project by a political subdivision pursuant to a new energy savings contract (ESCO) with a qualified provider under the Guaranteed Energy Savings Act (GESA) of 1996. '''Alternative Energy Production Projects (construction or development of):''' * An alternative energy project which produces energy from sources defined under the state [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=PA06R&re=1&ee=1 Alternative Energy Portfolio Standard (AEPS)], including wind, geothermal, biomass, waste energy, hydroelectric, fuel cells, biologically derived methane gas, fuel cells, and biomass; but '''not including solar energy'''.* * A facility that manufactures or produces alternative fuels * A facility that manufactures or produces products, including component parts that provide alternative energy (as defined above), improve energy efficiency, or conserve energy * An alternative energy or alternative fuel R&D facility * A project for the development or enhancement of rail transportation systems that deliver alternative fuels or high efficiency locomotives. * Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) and Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) fueling stations. Both types of project allow eligible costs associated with the preparation of plans, specifications, studies, and surveys, necessary or incidental to facilitating or developing an eligible project, and costs (up to 2%) associated with administering a grant. The individual support mechanisms are described in more detail below. For all types of support, there is a general requirement that applicants provide matching funds equivalent to the funding offered under the program (i.e., incentives generally limited to 50% of costs). '''Loans''' Loans are available at interest rate caculated 250 basis point higher than the 10 year treasury bond (set at 5% for 2014). Loans may generally be amortized over a period corresponding to the life of the equipment, not to exceed 25 years, and must be repaid within 10 years. Loans for energy efficiency and energy conservation projects (including geothermal systems) have a 10-year amortization. Loans for manufacturing facilities are limited to $40,000 per job created within three years of loan approval. Failure to create the requisite number of jobs within three years may cause the interest rate to be raised by 3% over the remaining portion of the loan. Loans are also generally limited to $5 million, although higher amounts may be authorized on a case-by-case basis as determined by the DCED. '''Grants''' Maximum amount of grant for any alternative energy project or clean energy project is capped at $2 million or 30% of the project cost. Public Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) or Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) can get a grant up to 40% of the project costs, while a private CNG or LNG facility can get a grant up to 25% of the cost. Grant for Home Performance Building is capped at 10% of the cost; $500,000 for energy saving contracts (ESCOs); and $175,000 for planning and feasibility studies. Grants for manufacturing facilities are available for up to $10,000 for every job created within three years of grant approval. Total maximum amount of financial incentive including combination of loans and grants for any project is limited to 50% of the total project cost. '''Loan Guarantees''' Loan guarantees will take the form of a grant that may be used in the event of financing default on the part of the applicant. Loan guarantees are limited to 75% of the deficiency up to $5 million. The term of the grant may not exceed five years.<br> <br> Special Session H.B. 1 authorized a total of $165 million for this program. Visit the program web site and review the funding guidelines for additional program details and application procedures.<br> <br> <br> ''*While solar energy is in fact eligible under the state AEPS, a specific solar energy program was also authorized as part of the enabling legislation and as a result solar energy projects have been excluded from some other programs created by the same legislation. The program guidelines do not list solar energy as an eligible technology. However, it appears that some solar technologies could qualify if they are incorporated into the broader design of a High Performance Building.''
    r design of a High Performance Building.''  +
  • '''''NOTE:''''''' '''Next round of solicit
    '''''NOTE:''''''' '''Next round of solicitation is expected to open on July 1st, 2015. ''''' In July 2011, Connecticut enacted legislation amending the state's [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=CT04R&re=1&ee=1 Renewables Portfolio Standard] and creating two new classes of renewable energy credits (RECs): Zero Emission Renewable Energy Credits (ZRECs) and Low Emission Renewable Energy Credits (LRECs).<br> <br> The state's two investor-owned electric utilities, United Illuminating (UI) and Connecticut Light & Power (CL&P) must enter into 15-year contracts for RECs from zero-emission "Class I" renewable energy facilities (on the customer side of the meter) larger than 100 kilowatts (kW) but not larger than one megawatt (MW). Zero-emission Class I facilities include solar, wind and hydro generators. Resulting zero emission RECs (ZRECs) may be used for RPS compliance during the year of generation or the subsequent year. Utilities are required to spend $8 million on ZREC contracts annually.* The price cap of one ZREC in 2012 was $350, $325.50 in 2013, and $302.71 in 2014. The Connecticut Public Utilities Regulatory Authority (PURA) may reduce the ZREC price cap annually by 3% to 7%.<br> <br> The two utilities also must enter into 15-year contracts for RECs from low-emission Class I renewable energy facilities (on the customer side of the meter) up to 2 MW. The law establishes the emission criteria required to achieve "low-emission facility" status, but this category could include facilities that generate electricity using fuel cells, biomass or landfill gas. Resulting low-emission RECs (LRECs) may be used for RPS compliance during the year of generation or the subsequent year. Utilities are required to spend up to $4 million on LREC contracts annually.* The price cap of one LREC was $200 in 2012 and 2013.<br> <br> The utilities jointly submitted their six-year solicitation plan in December 2011 and issued their first request for proposals (RFP) in May 2012. Winning bids are evaluated based on project quality, proposed ZREC or LREC price, and compliance with the RFP process. Bids must be submitted by email. Projects must be located in CL&P's or UI's service territory.<br> <br> <br> ''* PURA is authorized to review this budget and make adjustments after Year 3 for LRECs and Year 4 for ZRECs. It may terminate the program entirely if technology costs do not continue to fall. Because the utilities must spend $8 million per year on new 15-year ZREC contracts and $4 million per year on new 15-year LREC contracts, the total value of the annual solicitation is $120 million for ZRECs and $60 million for LRECs.''<br> <br>
    million for LRECs.''<br> <br>  +
  • '''''Note'''''''''': Xcel Energy is no lon
    '''''Note'''''''''': Xcel Energy is no longer accepting new application submissions for the former Solar*Rewards (2013) and Minnesota Bonus (2014) programs. Check the '''''[http://www.xcelenergy.com/Save_Money_&_Energy/Rebates/Solar*Rewards_-_MN Program Website]''''' for updates.''''' '''Solar*Rewards Program''' Xcel Energy's Solar*Rewards Program provides an incentive for residential and commercial customers that install grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems of at least 0.5 kilowatts (kW) and less than 40 kW. Systems larger than 40 kW do not qualify for the program. Previously, the incentive took the form of an up-front rebate of $2.25 per watt (W) DC; this rate has been decreased to $1.50/W for the 2013 program year. The 2014 Solar Rewards program offers an incentive based on the kWh production from the PV system, as recorded by the production emter. This incentive is paid annually at $0.08/kWh produced over 10 years. In exchange for the up-front incentive, the customer is required to enter into a 20-year contract with Xcel Energy that transfers ownership of all renewable energy credits (RECs) produced by the system to the utility during the life of the contract. The annual budget for this program is $5 million, with $4.6 million going toward incentives. <br> In order to qualify for the program, the PV system must be installed on a property or a building located in Minnesota that is owned by the applicant and that receives electric service from Xcel Energy. New construction projects are eligible for incentives, but must have an Xcel Energy electric meter on-site and an electricity account set up with the utility. In addition, customers must have performed energy audit within the last three years that meets the standards of Xcel Energy's energy audit program and may be required to implement certain measures identified in the energy audit prior to participating in the Solar*Rewards program. In lieu of an energy audit, residential customers with homes that have been Energy Star certified through the utility's Energy Star project automatically qualify. Likewise, commercial customers that have participated in one of several commercial energy efficiency programs offered by the utility also automatically qualify.<br> <br> To receive the incentive, participants must submit an application and receive approval from Xcel Energy prior to installing the system. The program has a $250 application fee. If, prior to the completion of an engineering review, the application is denied or the customer elects not participate in the program, the customer's application fee will be refunded. All PV systems must use new equipment, carry a five-year warranty, and meet several other equipment and installation requirements designed to assure the safe and effective operation of the system.<br> <br> Net metering is available for Xcel Energy's customers, although customers may be eligible to enroll in one of several other customer-generation options if they wish instead of net metering. Under net metering net excess generation (NEG) at the end of a monthly billing period is generally credited to the next month’s bill. If a customer's NEG balance exceeds $25.00 at the end of a billing period, the customer will be issued a check for the balance by the utility. Net metering takes place using a bi-directional meter for which the customer pays a small monthly fee. The program also requires a generation meter installed at the utility's expense to measure energy (i.e., REC production) by the solar system. Applicants can view the Solar*Rewards Customer Contract at the link above.<br> <br> '''Minnesota Made Bonus PV Solar Rebate Program'''<br> In addition to the Solar Rebate Program offered by Xcel Energy, consumers can also qualify for an additional rebate of $2.75/W with the purchase of "Minnesota Made" solar energy systems. This additional rebate is made possible with the passage of the 2010 [https://www.revisor.mn.gov/statutes/?id=116C.7791 Minnesota Statute 116C.7791: Rebates for Solar Photovoltaic Modules]. If the funds for the Solar*Rewards Program have been exhausted, Minnesota Made projects will still receive $5.00/W from the Minnesota Made Bonus budget. This may affect how the funds are distributed; contact the program administrator for more details.<br> <br> The “Minnesota Made” PV Solar Rebate [http://www.mn.gov/commerce/energy/topics/resources/energy-legislation-initiatives/made-in-minnesota/ Program] was designed to encourage the development and use of PV modules receiving a specified minimum component assembly by a Minnesota-based manufacturer. Funding for the program is designated for five years, and the calculated "Minnesota Made" rebate is paid out with five equal annual payments accordingly. <br> ''Program Qualifications''<br> To qualify for the Minnesota Made incentive program, an applicant must: * Be an Xcel Energy customer and have applied for and received an Xcel Energy Solar*Rewards interconnection agreement (All current Solar*Rewards program requirements apply). * Install qualified “Minnesota Made” PV modules as defined by [https://www.revisor.mn.gov/statutes/?id=116C.7791 state statute]. * Submit a valid purchase order through the Solar*Rewards online application process for qualified “Minnesota Made” PV equipment to ensure funds are placed in reserve for the project. The fund reservation will be confirmed in a Minnesota Made Incentive Acknowledgement letter. * Install the PV system within the funding year that the incentive reservation was assigned. * Sign a Minnesota Made Rebate contract confirming the payment calculation assumptions prior to payment. ''Calculating the "Minnesota Made" Rebate''<br> In June 2011, the Minnesota Public Utilities Commission approved changes (Docket No. E-002/M-10-1278) to the methodology for calculating the "Minnesota Made" Rebate. There are [http://www.xcelenergy.com/staticfiles/xe/Marketing/Files/MN-Res-Bonus-PV-SR-Attachment-A.pdf two separate calculation methods], depending on whether or not the applicant is using federal depreciation tax benefits in excess of the federal taxes imposed on the payments. If the applicant agrees with the statement "that it will not use, or by contract or other agreement permit another entity to use, federal depreciation tax benefits that exceed the federal tax imposed on rebates awarded under this application," then the applicant should use the Example 1 calculation. If the applicant does not agree with the statement, the federal depreciation value is deducted from the pre-tax sum of all rebates. The highest applicable income tax rate is used to add back taxes that would be applied to the payment. Applicants that do not agree to the statement should use Example 2 in the above document in order to calculate the rebate.
    document in order to calculate the rebate.  +