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1-CAN – Land Use Planning Overview In Canada, a bulk transmission developer should ensure the project complies with the adopted provincial, territorial, and municipal Land Use Plans (LUPs) and zoning regulations. Provincial, territorial, and municipal agencies use land use plans to manage lands under their control. Provincial, territorial, and municipal agencies refer to LUPs by different names, but all LUPs serve the same purpose; to dictate what actions can and cannot be taken on the unit of land.


In addition to LUPs, provinces, territories, and local and/or municipal governments localities often have zoning regulations in place that may restrict development activities on a unit of land. Zoning regulations may dictate the type of buildings allowed on a particular unit of land, the location of utility lines, setbacks from streets or other boundaries, and the size and height of a building. Provinces and territories often delegate land use planning and zoning to local and/or municipal governments. However, provinces like British Columbia have a cooperative land use planning process between the provincial government and the local governments. Some provinces and/or territories have a LUP, while others allow each local/municipal government to adopt and implement their own LUP, and some provinces and territories have a provincial, or territorial wide LUP and allow each local/municipal government to adopt and implement their own LUP.

1.1– Initiate State/Local Land Use Planning

A bulk transmission developer should review the provincial, territorial, and/or local/municipal LUPs and zoning regulations where the proposed project will be located. The developer should ensure compliance with province, territory, and/or local/municipal LUPs and regulations. If the proposed project does not comply with a LUP and/or a zoning regulation, the developer may be able to petition for an amendment to the LUP or may be able to obtain a variance to the zoning regulation.

Alberta

Alberta delegates elements of land use planning to municipal governments. For more information, see:

Land Use Planning:
1-AB-a

British Columbia

British Columbia land use planning is a cooperative process between the provincial and local governments. Both local governments and the provincial government engage in land use planning activities. For more information, see:

Land Use Planning:
1-BC-a

”Manitoba”

Manitoba delegates land use planning primarily to municipal and local governments. For more information, see:

Land Use Planning:
1-MB-a

”New Brunswick”

New Brunswick delegates land use planning primarily to municipal and local governments. For more information, see:

Land Use Planning:
1-NB-a

”Ontario”

Ontario delegates land use planning to municipal and territorial governments. For more information, see:

Land Use Planning:
1-ON-a

‘‘‘Quebec’’’

Quebec land use planning is a cooperative process between the provincial government and municipalities. Both local governments and the provincial government engage in land use planning activities. For more information, see:

Land Use Planning:
1-QC-a

Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan land use planning is a cooperative process between the provincial and municipal governments. For more information, see:

Land Use Planning:
1- SK-a

”Yukon”

Yukon delegates land use planning primarily to municipal governments. For more information, see:

Land Use Planning:
1-YK-a