How do I add open data requirements into my government contract?

Submitted by Ianjkalin on 13 February, 2013 - 18:33

3 answers

Points: 0

For those looking to advance open data guidelines at the Request for Proposal (RFP) stage, see also these contractual terms from a recent Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA)for maintenance of the DSIRE.org platform: "To maximize the public benefit of this financial assistance, all data must be fully accessible and downloadable, through a newly developed data feed or through existing infrastructure through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s (NREL) Open Energy Information (OpenEI) project . OpenEI currently hosts most of the existing data, generated by DSIRE, in the “Incentives and Policies for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency” (http://en.openei.org/wiki/Gateway:Incentives_and_Policies). OpenEI also contains an Application Programming Interface (API) which allows developers to request information directly from the database and can provide output without going through the website. Whether the applicant chooses to maintain a database and data feed outside of or as part of the OpenEI infrastructure, the applicant must cooperate with and make all data accessible on OpenEI. OpenEI is a free, open-source, knowledge-sharing platform providing access to data, models, tools, and information that accelerate the transition to clean energy systems."
"Applicants retain the flexibility to utilize the methods they deem most appropriate, including considerations for performance such as API rate limitations depending on the authorization method being used and whether the method itself requires authentications. Applicants are strongly encouraged to develop strategies that will build and make platforms available through modern mobile and web accessible platforms."
"Applicants must develop and submit in their applications strategies through data entered on Open EI, and thus exportable to XML and available through an API, or to DOE/Open EI through an open format such as XML or JSON". Ianjkalin on 26 March, 2013 - 18:28

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Another great reference for general principals on open data come from O'Reilly Media: "1. Data Must Be Complete: All public data are made available. Data are electronically stored information or recordings, including but not limited to documents, databases, transcripts, and audio/visual recordings. Public data are data that are not subject to valid privacy, security or privilege limitations, as governed by other statutes. 2. Data Must Be Primary: Data are published as collected at the source, with the finest possible level of granularity, not in aggregate or modified forms. 3. Data Must Be Timely: Data are made available as quickly as necessary to preserve the value of the data. 4. Data Must Be Accessible: Data are available to the widest range of users for the widest range of purposes. 5. Data Must Be Machine processable: Data are reasonably structured to allow automated processing of it. 6. Access Must Be Non-Discriminatory: Data are available to anyone, with no requirement of registration. 7. Data Formats Must Be Non-Proprietary: Data are available in a format over which no entity has exclusive control. 8. Data Must Be License-free: Data are not subject to any copyright, patent, trademark or trade secret regulation. Reasonable privacy, security and privilege restrictions may be allowed as governed by other statutes. Finally, compliance must be reviewable. A contact person must be designated to respond to people trying to use the data. A contact person must be designated to respond to complaints about violations of the principles. An administrative or judicial court must have the jurisdiction to review whether the agency has applied these principles appropriately." Ianjkalin on 13 February, 2013 - 18:46

Points: 0

There are many ways to accomplish this. In general, treating data as a deliverable provides a great deal of enforceable control and definition. If there are a table of deliverables, the requirements can be as simple as: A. Deliverable name (e.g. database of solar costs) B. Format (e.g. hosted web site that is both human readable and machine readable with fully searchable text) C. Deadline (e.g. December 25, 2012) D. Deliverable Specification (e.g. "each data set shall have metadata associated with it in a separate catalogue as defined in Attachment A...") Deliverable specifications for open data can be easily linked to the following OMB guidance: http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/omb/egov/digital-government/digital-government.html Before a contract a signed, a clause like the following could be added to the proposal solicitation: "Evaluation Criteria includes the adequacy of a proposed deliverables list for raw-data disclosure. This includes, but is not limited to, representative details or a plan for the specific datasets to be delivered in an open, machine-readable format to publically accessible data discovery platforms like www.OpenEI.org, or equivalently open web technologies." Ianjkalin on 13 February, 2013 - 18:41